CBSSports.com's Top 100 players in college hoops for 2014-15

Montrezl Harrell
Louisville's Montrezl Harrell is the highest ranked returning player in our Top 100. (USATSI)

The CBSSports.com Preseason All-America teams are done by me with input from colleagues. But our List of Top 100 College Basketball Players is pure democracy, meaning I voluntarily relinquished my veto power in the spirit of making what amounts to a poll.

In other words, what you see here won't exactly match what you saw there.

That's the first thing you need to know.

The second thing you need to know is that I apparently have radically different opinions about what makes a top-100 player than my colleagues Matt Norlander and Sam Vecenie. They're the two people who helped me do this, and we did the first 94 spots by voting for players in groups of 10. What I learned pretty quickly is that they, for the most part, value big-stat guys on average teams in below-average leagues way more than I do, and that'll be reflected in these rankings. Which is fine, honestly. Reasonable minds can disagree, and that's what makes this fun. And Norlander will forever be the person who once upon a time fought like crazy to include Nate Wolters, and, because that turned out OK, he deserves the benefit of the doubt, I think.

Or, at least, I guess.

Either way, dive in and enjoy.

Again, we voted for the first 94 spots in groups of 10 and slotted them accordingly. Then we each selected two players that we wanted to make sure were included, and we included them at the end. What you see below is the finished product.

CBSSports.com
Top 100 Players

1.  JAHLIL OKAFOR

 Duke Blue Devils

Okafor is the CBSSports.com Preseason National Player of the Year and projected No. 1 pick of the 2015 NBA Draft. Mike Krzyzewski has already said there's nobody else like him in college basketball, and I agree. At the top of these rankings is where Okafor belongs. -- Gary Parrish

2.  MONTREZL HARRELL

 Louisville Cardinals

Harrell, a junior, is now clearly The Guy for the Cards after the graduation of Russ Smith, who we'll miss dearly. The likely future top-10 pick put up 14 points and 8.4 boards per game last season, and it's hard to see those numbers not going up. Menacing yet fun. --Matt Norlander

3. MARCUS PAIGE

 North Carolina Tar Heels

Paige developed into the best offensive guard in the NCAA last season with his ability to not only consistently get into the middle of the lane, but also with his further-developed outside jumper. He'll be the engine that makes UNC's high-powered offense go. --Sam Vecenie 

4. SAM DEKKER

 Wisconsin Badgers

Dekker grew two or three inches in the offseason, which undeniably helped his NBA stock. It's hard to pick between him and his slightly taller teammate (as you'll see below). But, either way, the bottom line is this: Wisconsin might have the nation's best 1-2 punch. -- GP

5. FRANK KAMINSKY

 Wisconsin Badgers

Bucky senior big man has a skillset that's unique to college basketball: can and will beat you from 2 or 20 feet. How will he handle being a househould name and big-time target? Well, Wisconsin's got a superb starting five, so the pressure's not likely to be too heavy on just him. Kaminsky averaged 13.9 points and 6.3 boards per game last season. Worth a Twitter follow. -- MN

6. KARL TOWNS

 Kentucky Wildcats

Towns arguably possesses more natural ability than anyone in college basketball this season, with a complete offensive repertoire that has even expanded out to the 3-point line. The only question is whether he'll get the minutes to be an All-American candidate. -- SV

7. GEORGES NIANG

 Iowa State Cyclones 

The Cyclones will miss Melvin Ejim and DeAndre Kane. But they'll still be a factor in the Big 12, and Niang is the biggest reason why. The junior forward averaged 16.7 points and 4.5 rebounds per game last season. If he gets that 3-point percentage up, watch out. -- GP

8. CARIS LEVERT

 Michigan Wolverines

My colleagues pushed LeVert this high, and there are plenty who would agree with that. The junior (12.9 PPG, 4.3 RPG, 2.9 APG) has the most ever-coveted upside of anyone on this list, I think. His usage rate is probably going to surge, and if Derrick Walton runs the Michigan offense well, LeVert will benefit in big ways. -- MN

9. RONDAE HOLLIS-JEFFERSON

 Arizona Wildcats

We expect RHJ to take a big step forward after coming off the bench in 2013-14. No player in college basketball is a better source of relentless energy, and if he can add a midrange jumper to the mix Arizona's offensive balance will be tough to defend. -- SV

10. STANLEY JOHNSON

 Arizona Wildcats

As is also the case at Wisconsin, it's difficult to pick between Arizona's top two players. Obviously, Hollis-Jefferson got the nod here. But the difference between he and Johnson is slim, and Johnson is widely regarded as the superior NBA prospect even if Hollis-Jefferson might be the better college player. -- GP

11. FRED VANVLEET

 Wichita State Shockers

Love how smooth and composed FVV's game is. The junior point guard isn't going to wow you walking off the bus, but he's got terrific hands, never misses an assignment on defense and almost never makes a play that could be described as the wrong one. WSU can atone for that brutal Kentucky Round of 32 matchup and reach the Sweet 16 this season primarily because of a man named Fred. -- MN

12. JUWAN STATEN

 West Virginia Mountaineers

A throwback guard whose talents would have seemingly been more suited to when the 3-point line wasn't as heavily-used as it is today, Staten's ability to get into the teeth of the defense is unmatched among college guards. He could carry the Mountaineers back to the NCAA Tournament-- SV

13. TYUS JONES

 Duke Blue Devils

Jones is among the purest point guards in college basketball, and his adjustment to this level should be smooth. It'll be interesting to see how he plays alongside Quinn Cook, a senior. But, make no mistake, the Blue Devils will be his team to run from the opening tip. -- GP

14. CLIFF ALEXANDER

 Kansas Jayhawks

Saw plenty of Alexander in person at the AAU level, and I assure you he is a bull in a China shop. But will that style translate in full at the high-major level? I'm not so sure. If Alexander buys in, understands his role on offense and snags the 11 boards per game he's capable of, he'll easily be a top-15 player. -- MN

15.  WILLIE CAULEY-STEIN

 Kentucky Wildcats

The best returning defensive big man in America. He led the SEC in block rate at 12.3 percent last season, but also has the quickness to hedge out onto guards on the perimeter. A veritable difference maker despite his offensive limitations. -- SV

16. MYLES TURNER

 Texas Longhorns

Turner was a late bloomer, relatively speaking. But boy did he bloom. The 6-11 center has a 7-4 wingspan, and he'll likely start for the Longhorns in the opener despite the fact that Rick Barnes has a talented and experienced frontcourt already in place. -- GP

17. TERRAN PETTEWAY

 Nebraska Cornhuskers

Casual fans might not know him, but the Nebraska senior (18.1 PPG, 4.8 RPG) is the primary guy responsible for this Cornhusker transformation. Petteway is a feared/respected player in the Big Ten and a guy Tim Miles will rely on to earn a single-digit seed come March. -- MN 

18. JUSTISE WINSLOW

 Duke Blue Devils

The closest approximation to Michael Kidd-Gilchrist that we've seen since MKG left college. Winslow, simply put, is an exceptional athlete and winner that could immediately step in as the best wing defender in all of college basketball. -- SV

19. RON BAKER

 Wichita State Shockers

Baker's teammate (VanVleet) is the reigning MVC Player of the Year. But it'll surprise nobody if Baker earns the award this season because he'll be taking (and making) a lot of the shots available now that Cleanthony Early is in the NBA, meaning Baker's average of 13.6 PPG will surely rise, possibly to around 20 PPG. -- GP

20. Marcus Foster

 Kansas State Wildcats

I think the KSU sophomore (15.5 PPG, 3.2 RPG, 2.5 APG) has a shot at being a Third Team All-American, and I expect him to score at least 20 points per game this season.  -- MN  

21. KELLY OUBRE

 Kansas Jayhawks

Oubre may not start immediately for the Jayhawks, but he might end up having an equal impact to that of Andrew Wiggins last season. The confident freshman seems ready to embrace his potential stardom and lead the talented Jayhawks to another Big 12 title. -- SV

22. PERRY ELLIS

 Kansas Jayhawks

How many folks realize it was Ellis -- not Joel Embiid/not Wayne Selden -- who was KU's second-leading scorer last season? There's nothing too flashy about the junior forward. But he's solid and important to Kansas' quest to win what feels like an 87th straight Big 12 title. -- GP

23. DELON WRIGHT

 Utah Utes

You might not have seen enough of the Utes' senior point guard in recent years, but he's going to be drafted and he's going to get Utah to the NCAA Tournament this season. Wright put up 15.5 points, 6.8 rebounds and 5.3 assists a year ago. -- MN

24. AARON HARRISON

 Kentucky Wildcats

Mr. Big Shot of last season's NCAA Tournament, Harrison is the preseason choice for SEC player of the Year. If he irons out the perimeter shot and becomes slightly more consistent, he might be the leader that the Wildcats need to step up. -- SV

25. BUDDY HIELD

 Oklahoma Sooners

It's been too long since college basketball had a relevant player named "Buddy," far as I'm concerned. The 6-4 junior averaged 16.5 points per game last season. He'll lead OU back to the NCAA Tournament ... and maybe to a Final Four if TaShawn Thomas gets eligible. -- GP

26. KEVIN PANGOS

 Gonzaga Bulldogs

Pangos (14.4 PPG, 3.3 RPG, 3.6 APG) is this low because, even though he's going to make it rain, there are still overall better players. He's just a really good player in a great system and set up for a super year. Gonzaga fans are going to love this team and how Pangos will be the one guiding the ship. -- MN

27. MALCOLM BROGDON

 Virginia Cavaliers

Among the most underrated players in the country nationally, Brogdon isn't flashy and doesn't make the highlight play. However, he's among the best two-way players, and his numbers went up across the board once the Cavaliers entered ACC play last season. -- SV

28. R.J. HUNTER

 Georgia State Panthers

I saw Hunter this past summer at the LeBron James Skills Academy and walked away convinced he's way more than just a guy posting big numbers in the Sun Belt. He's a great player and future pro. And, man, he can really, really shoot it from deep. -- GP

29. BRANDEN DAWSON

 Michigan State Spartans

Sparty power forward is an athletic freak that's only missing a reliable 12-foot jumper. But Dawson (11.2 PPG, 8.3 RPG) has too much natural talent not to put him in the top 30. He'll make a few posters this season. -- MN

30. JERIAN GRANT

 Notre Dame Fighting Irish

Grant was on his way to a potential All-American season in 2013-14 before his suspension, averaging 19.2 points and 6.2 assists per game in 12 contests. Look for more of the same as he tries to lead Notre Dame back to the NCAA Tournament in his final season. -- SV

31. JORDAN MICKEY (LSU)

Jarell Martin was the most-hyped freshman at LSU last year, but Mickey was the better player, undeniably. He averaged 12.7 points and 7.9 rebounds last season. He's the reason LSU should end up in the NCAA Tournament for the first time under Johnny Jones. -- GP

32. WAYNE SELDEN (KANSAS)

I'm expecting the Kansas sophomore (9.7 PPG, 2.6 RPG, 2.5 APG) to have a breakout season, in part because he's got the demeanor for leadership and the goods to challenge Perry Ellis for leading the team in scoring. We may have him too low. -- MN

33. CHASSON RANDLE (STANFORD)

An undersized scoring guard, Randle has every move in the book offensively to get into scoring position. He keeps the defense off-balance with an array of different crossovers, hits floaters in the lane, and can even consistently knock down 3-pointers. He'll be relied upon more this season as Stanford loses Josh Huestis and Dwight Powell. -- SV

34. TYLER HAWS (BYU)

Haws doesn't look or play like Jimmer Fredette, but he sure scores like him. The 6-5 guard averaged 21.7 points per game in 2012-13, 23.2 points per game in 2013-14. Can he hit 25 points per game this season? I wouldn't rule it out. -- GP

35. TREVEON GRAHAM (VCU)

He's among the best seniors in all of college basketball. Graham (15.8 PPG, 7.0 RPG) won the one-on-one tournament two years straight at the CP3 camp. He continues to impress NBA scouts, and one coach told me he's the "Kawhi Leonard of college basketball" in that he's all business, all production, and not looking for his name in lights. He can get VCU 30 wins. -- MN

36. BOBBY PORTIS (ARKANSAS)

Portis was one of the more underrated players in the nation after his freshman season. He's all-around star that can knock down midrange jumpers consistently, run in transition, get to the rim on a post up, and swat shots away near the basket. If the Razorbacks make the NCAA Tournament for the first time in seven years, it'll be on his broad shoulders. -- SV

37. DAKARI JOHNSON (KENTUCKY)

The return of the Harrisons got most of the attention at Kentucky, but Johnson is really the only UK player who definitely rejected the chance to be a first-round pick in the NBA Draft. He's far from flashy. But he's big-bodied and effective. -- GP

38. JOSEPH YOUNG (OREGON)

On a decent Ducks team last season, Young, now a senior, averaged 18.9 points. Oregon's got scholarship numbers in single digits on the roster this year, so ... 24 PPG for Young? -- MN 

39. YOGI FERRELL (INDIANA)

After showcasing his distribution skills on Indiana's highly-talented 2012-13 team, Ferrell took a step forward as IU's lead scorer in 2013-14. The most impressive part of that increase in usage is that Ferrell's efficiency actually increased, as his true-shooting rate jumped from 51 percent to 57 percent. -- SV

40. Alan Williams (UC-SANTA BARBARA)

Personally, I'm not big on putting a borderline NBA prospect from the Big West in the top 40 -- especially when that puts Williams one spot ahead of the four prospects immediately below him. But Norlander and Vecenie really love Williams and the double-double he averages. To be clear, he belongs on this list, and he's a nice and accomplished college player. So don't get it twisted. I'm not hating. I just think the top 40 is a tad high. That's all. -- GP 

41. TREY LYLES (KENTUCKY)

Lyles, a freshman, might be a top-20 player by March. But we're uncertain on playing time and platoon placement as of now. -- MN 

42. BRANDON ASHLEY (ARIZONA)

Arizona started the season 21-0 before losing Ashley to a broken foot in February against Cal. After his injury, the Wildcats went 12-5. Ashley provides the Wildcats with a lot of versatility, especially on the defensive end; he has the athleticism and length to defend both on the perimeter or in the paint. His return is a big part of why the Wildcats are among the favorites to win the NCAA title. -- SV

43. CHRIS WALKER (FLORIDA)

Walker is clearly the most disappointing prospect from the Class of 2013, at least to date. But the potential for greatness is still there, and the guess here is that he'll have a breakthrough season. And he better. Because, if he doesn't, those lottery projections will disappear. -- GP

44. D'ANGELO RUSSELL (OHIO STATE)

The freshman is immediately Ohio State's best option on offense, and you'll probably see him start to carry the load by about game No. 5. OSU's offense was brutal last year, but with Russell it should jump a few points on average and efficiency alone. -- MN

45. KEIFER SYKES (GREEN BAY)

Listed at 5-11, 166 pounds, Sykes is hardly an imposing presence. But the Green Bay guard is one of the best players in the country, as fast as a locomotive and capable of leaping over tall forwards in a single bound. -- SV

46. MICHAEL FRAZIER (FLORIDA)

The departures of Casey Prather and Scottie Wilbekin leave Frazier as the Gators' top returning scorer. He averaged 12.4 points per game last season while shooting 44.7 percent from 3-point range. -- GP

47. JARELL MARTIN (LSU)

This fairly anonymous sophomore forward (10.3 PPG, 4.6 RPG) should have a breakout year. He's probably going to be an NBA pick. -- MN

48. OLIVIER HANLAN (BOSTON COLLEGE)

Hanlan is one of the best returning scorers in the country, capable of exploding for 30-plus on any given night. He needs to improve on getting others involved if he wants to move onto the next level, but there's a good chance he'll average more than 20 points per game on a Boston College team that has lost many of its supporting talents. -- SV

49. JABARI BIRD (CALIFORNIA)

Cuonzo Martin didn't inherit the best situation at Cal -- especially in the frontcourt. But Bird is a piece any coach would love to have. If things go well, this will likely be his final year of college. -- GP

50. WESLEY SAUNDERS (HARVARD)

Senior guard/forward for the Crimson is a do-it-all type (14.2 PPG, 4.6 RPG, 3.8 APG) that has Hah-vuhd fans dreaming about winning another NCAA Tourney game or two. I like Saunders' ability to basically not be beat. Attitude is everything, and he now has it in spades. -- MN

51. ISAIAH TAYLOR (TEXAS)

Taylor burst onto the scene as a freshman last year, averaging 12.7 points and four assists per contest for the Tournament-bound Longhorns. This season, he'll be tasked with creating the offense for a Texas team replete with big men such as the aforementioned Turner, Jonathan Holmes, and Cameron Ridley. -- SV

52. RASHAD VAUGHN (UNLV)

Vaughn is the latest talented freshman to enroll at UNLV under Dave Rice. He won't be an eventual No. 1 pick like Anthony Bennett once was. But he'll make a huge impact in Las Vegas, and he'll do so immediately. -- GP

53. D'ANGELO HARRISON (ST. JOHN'S)

Maddening at times to watch but undeniably gifted with the basketball. This St. John's senior shooting guard put up 17.5 points a year ago, and he'll need to get his team to the NCAAs to help Steve Lavin's job security, especially when you realize we've got a few Johnnies on our list. -- MN 

54. D'VAUNTES SMITH-RIVERA (GEORGETOWN)

Smith-Rivera could take home Big East player of the year this season after averaging 17.6 points per game for the Hoyas in 2013-14. The smooth-shooting combo guard possessed a near-60 percent true-shooting rate to go with his five rebounds per contest. -- SV

55. RYAN BOATRIGHT (CONNECTICUT)

Coaches in the American Athletic Conference voted Boatright the preseason Player of the Year, and that makes sense considering he's the top returning player on the reigning national champions. The only question is whether he'll flourish or struggle without Shabazz Napier. -- GP

56. TERRY ROZIER (LOUISVILLE)

The 6-foot-1 Cards soph is still finding his way. He put up 7 points per game last season, but Rozier is expected to see a lot of increased production with Russ Smith gone. I happen to really like his game due to his ability to step out and shoot and use the dribble to his advantage in doing so. -- MN

57. JAYVAUGHN PINKSTON (VILLANOVA)

The big man entering his final season in Philly will need to pick up some of the slack for a team that will be missing James Bell from last season's 29-win team. Few players are as effective at getting to the line as Pinkston, who drew 6.3 fouls per-40 minutes last year. -- SV

58. JOSH SCOTT (COLORADO)

Colorado sure did miss Spencer Dinwiddie last season, but Scott was solid regardless. He averaged 14.1 points and 8.4 rebounds as a sophomore. -- GP

59. AARON WHITE (IOWA)

Huge Aaron White fan. I think he's the second-toughest matchup in the Big Ten to Kaminsky. Is a threat to pwn defenders with a dribble-and-drop-step for a dunk from as far out as 18 feet. Senior averaged 12.8 points, 6.7 boards last season. -- MN 

60. JONATHAN HOLMES (TEXAS)

Holmes will be making a move to the wing this season to accommodate the freshman Turner after three seasons as a power forward. The Texas forward had a 25.9 PER last year, good for third in the Big 12. -- SV

61. BRICE JOHNSON (NORTH CAROLINA)

Johnson quietly averaged 10.3 points and 6.1 rebounds as a sophomore last season. He's one of the many weapons on UNC's roster that's good enough to make a Final Four. -- GP

62. WINSTON SHEPARD (SAN DIEGO STATE)

If it were up to me, I'd have him around 40th, because SDSU is going to be in the mix for a No. 4 seed or better due to him. Team has terrific D, but the junior combo forward (11.6 PPG, 4.9 RPG, 2.1 APG) is about to show he's stronger than he looks and the most well-rounded player in the Mountain West. -- MN 

63. ISAIAH WHITEHEAD (SETON HALL)

Seton Hall's incoming freshman will be one of the best true scorers in all of college basketball. He's extremely quick, shoots the ball well from the outside, and can finish from just about any angle when he gets to the rim. -- SV

64. DERRICK MARKS (BOISE STATE)

Marks is one of two good reasons (the other is listed below) that Boise State is worth watching away from the football field. He's not much of a threat beyond the arc. But he's still an effective college basketball player. -- GP

65. MARKUS KENNEDY (SMU)

We don't know if the junior big man (12.4 PPG, 7.1 RPG) is going to be cleared for action right away (grades issue). If he is, I think he'll be the Player of the Year in the AAC. -- MN 

66. DARRUN HILLIARD (VILLANOVA)

Hilliard showed himself to be a knockdown 3-point shooter last year, making 41 percent of his nearly 170 attempts. If he can replicate that type of percentage again, pairing that with his defensive skill will make him one of the premier wings in the Big East. -- SV

67. DEZ WELLS (MARYLAND)

Wells has been a really good -- but never great -- college player for three years. Is this the year he becomes great? If so, Mark Turgeon could get the Terps to the NCAA Tournament for the firs time. -- GP

68. NIGEL WILLIAMS-GOSS (WASHINGTON)

More people should know about him, but the Huskies sophomore (13.4 PPG, 4.4 RPG, 4.4 APG) is on a team that's not great and doesn't see a lot of national TV. If he comes back for a junior year, chances are good he'll be in our top 40 this time next season. -- MN

69. ANDREW HARRISON (KENTUCKY)

The controversial Wildcat point guard should be better this season, as he's now had an offseason to adjust his game to the speed of the collegiate game. If he doesn't, incoming freshman Tyler Ulis could take over some of the minutes that Harrison got by default last season. -- SV

70. KEVON LOONEY (UCLA)

Looney was the Gatorade Player of the Year in the state of Wisconsin last season ... and a McDonald's All-American. Steve Alford needs him to be really good really quickly. -- GP

71. ANDRE HOLLINS (MINNESOTA)

Probably the most underrated player in the Big Ten. Golden Gophers senior does a little bit of everything (13.6 PPG, 3.5 RPG, 2.4 APG) and is known for making the small plays that kill teams after working for 25 seconds against the shot clock. -- MN 

72. NORMAN POWELL (UCLA)

Powell will be taking a step into the forefront for the Bruins this season after being their glue guy the past two years. Powell is an excellent athlete who uses his length and quickness to be a defensive stopper. Now, the Bruins need some of that athleticism to translate to the offensive end. -- SV

73. ALEX POYTHRESS (KENTUCKY)

The fact that Poythress remains in school is makes him a bit of an oddity at Kentucky, and it's doubtful he'll ever be the player he was expected to be coming out of high school. Still, his experience is worth something on this deep and talented roster, and he'll be an important part of UK's probable SEC championship team. -- GP

74. BYRON WESLEY (GONZAGA)

USC senior transfer is now with Mark Few and we're happy to include him here, because he's probably going to be better than you realize. Wesley's inclusion is why I think Gonzaga's a worthy candidate for 2015 Final Four. He rounds out the team so well. Don't believe me? He put up 17.8 points, 6.4 snags, and 2.3 assists in his most recent season at Southern Cal. -- MN 

75. RASHEED SULAIMON (DUKE)

The mercurial Sulaimon has always had talent; the only question has always been whether or not he could stay out of Coach K's doghouse. This season, Sulaimon is apparently embracing his role and working hard on the defensive end. His skill level is very high, so if he can stay on the court he might end up vastly out-performing this ranking. -- SV

76. ANTHONY BROWN (STANFORD)

Brown was one of four double-digit scorers on Stanford's Sweet 16 team last season. If he takes the natural step, the Cardinal might -- might -- be able to challenge Arizona in the Pac-12. -- GP

77. SIYANI CHAMBERS (HARVARD)

Harvard's junior point guard is heady, emotional and tougher than two-day-old bagels. Chambers (11.1 PPG, 4.6 APG) is one of those pound-for-pound comparative guys. He could start at the 1 for all but maybe 10 teams in the country. -- MN

78. DORIAN FINNEY-SMITH (FLORIDA)

Finney-Smith wil step into the starting lineup after coming off of the bench for last year's Final Four team. If he can iron out his 3-point jumper, he could be one of the big breakout players in the SEC this season. If not, he'll still be an excellent, tough role player on a potential top 10 team. -- SV

79. SHAWN LONG (LOUISIANA-LAFAYETTE)

Elfrid Payton got so much attentiona at Louisiana-Lafayette last season that I'm not sure most realize Long posted similarly big numbers. He averaged 18.6 points and 10.4 rebounds while blocking 2.6 shots per game. -- GP

80. SHAQ GOODWIN (MEMPHIS)

The Tigers junior big man (11.5 PPG, 6.5 RPG) still hasn't matched his hype coming out of high school, but I'm thinking this will be the year. Expecting Goodwin to turn the corner and keep Memphis in (or above) the bubble conversation. -- MN 

81. LEBRYAN NASH (OKLAHOMA STATE)

Nash has been nothing if not consistent during his career, averaging between 13.3 and 14.0 points per game in each of his three seasons in Stillwater. Now that Marcus Smart and Markel Brown are gone though, look for Nash to take a step forward and mature as a scorer without them. -- SV

82. ANTHONY DRMIC (BOISE STATE)

Drmic, like his teammate Marks, shot 44.1 percent from the field last season. If he can get that up just a little, averaging 18-to-20 points per game isn't out of the question. -- GP

83. LARRY NANCE JR. (WYOMING)

Let the record show I wanted this fella placed in the 60s. The Wyoming senior had an ACL tear last February that cut short a great season (15.4 PPG, 8.6 RPG). He's not as good as his dad, but no shame in that -- his dad was SWEET. The Cowboys have a capable mid-range player combo'd with someone who will fly, grind or sneak around you in the paint for boards and points. -- MN 

84. NIC MOORE (SMU)

Depending on how the Mustangs' season goes, Moore could be a dark horse candidate for AAC player of the year. The point guard of what was likely the last team out of the NCAA Tournament, the diminutive guard knocks down 3-pointers and creates plays to get everyone on SMU involved like few others in the country. -- SV

85. AUSTIN NICHOLS (MEMPHIS)

Nichols isn't the top returning scorer or rebounder at Memphis, and he's not the highest-rated Tiger on this list, either. Still, the sophomore is considered by most to be Josh Pastner's top talent, and he'll need to be great this season if Memphis is to make the NCAA Tournament for the fifth consecutive season. -- GP

86. JOHN BROWN (HIGH POINT)

Not bad for a guy who didn't even intend on playing college basketball, let alone becoming the Big South Player of the Year. Now a senior, Brown (19.5, 7.7 RPG) should get High Point to its first NCAA Tournament. -- MN

87. ANGEL RODRIGUEZ (MIAMI)

The former Kansas State guard is entering his first season at Miami, where he'll take his 11.4 points per game and excellent defense with him as he tries to lead Jim Larranaga's Hurricanes back to the heights they reached just as recently as 2012. -- SV

88. JUSTIN JACKSON (NORTH CAROLINA)

Proof that Roy Williams and his staff really trust and believe in Jackson came when the freshman wing started in UNC's first exhibition. He's another reason why NBA scouts will basically live in the Raleigh area this season. -- GP

89. SPEEDY SMITH (LOUISIANA TECH)

Who's the best assist man in college hoops? Him. The senior Bulldogs 1 averaged 7.7 dimes a year ago, tops in D-I. Louisiana Tech is favored in C-USA, with good reason. At 6-3, also averaged 7.8 points and 3.8 boards.  -- MN

90. A.J. HAMMONS (PURDUE)

Hammons was one of the best per-minute players in the Big Ten last season, averaging 17 points, 12 rebounds, and five blocks per-40 minutes. The problem with Hammons is that he can't stay on the court due to his conditioning and foul problems. If he can get into the 30 minute per game range this season, Purdue could be better than expected. -- SV

91. JORDAN SIBERT (DAYTON)

Let the record show I wanted Sibert significantly higher than this because, you know, I value guys who are the leading scorers on Sweet 16 teams. -- GP

92. JARVIS SUMMERS (OLE MISS)

Summers, overall, will be much more productive (17.3 PPG, 2.4 RPG, 3.8 APG) than Marshall Henderson was in his senior season. Not sure the Rebels can get to 20 wins, but if it happens it'll be because of Summers, a guy who doesn't earn headlines but is a headache to scheme against. -- MN 

93. MICHAEL QUALLS (ARKANSAS)

There are few more athletic players in the NCAA than Qualls, an elite leaper with great lateral quickness. If the jumper improves into the 40 percent range this season, he could become an all-SEC player with NBA potential. -- SV

94. AMIDA BRIMAH (CONNECTICUT)

Brimah is a shot-altering big with NBA potential even if he's raw offensively. A nice season that shows development could secure him a spot in the first round of June's NBA Draft. -- GP

95. KALEB TARCZEWSKI (ARIZONA)

Blame the other two guys voting for this list for the top returning rebounder -- and second-leading returning scorer -- from a consensus top-four team being this low. To earn respect from Norlander and Vecenie, Tarzcewski might out to transfer to a Big West school. -- GP

96. CHRIS OBEKPA (ST. JOHN'S)

I'm a big believer in Obekpa, a junior who's averaged 3.6 blocks the past two seasons. He's got a rawness to him still, but based on our selection criteria, if you're telling me you'd take more than 100 other players before choosing him, we can't have lunch together for a while. -- MN

97. BRAD WALDOW (ST. MARY'S)

No one in the NCAA is quite like Waldow, the vampire-mouthpiece-wearing, 270-pound center who is among the best post players in the country. The 6.8 fouls he drew per-40 minutes brought him to the line nearly eight times per game in conference play. I'm excited to see his unique game back in action for his final season with Randy Bennett. -- SV

98. CAMERON RIDLEY (TEXAS)

Ridley averaged 11.2 points and 8.2 rebounds last season in the middle for the Longhorns. Those numbers might go down thanks to the enrollment of Turner. But Ridley will remain a highly relevant player for a nationally relevant team. -- GP

99. RYSHEED JORDAN (ST. JOHN'S)

Jordan struggled through innumerable hardships last season, including the death of a childhood friend and his aunt in a seven month period. Jordan fought through that and quietly averaged 14 points and 3.3 assists per game in St. John's final nine contests of the season. I look for this former five-star recruit to break out in a big way in 2014-15. -- SV

100. D.J. BALENTINE (EVANSVILLE)

I really, really struggled in picking my last guy, and there are a few who rightfully you can gripe for (E.C. Matthews! Denzel Valentine! Corey Hawkins!), but Balentine remains a hidden gem and should get the nod. The senior put up 22.8 points last season, third-best in college hoops behind Doug McDermott and Antoine Mason. Also averaged 4.2 assists! From a matchup standpoint, Valley coaches will tell you he's the toughest in the league. Has to be included here. -- MN

CBS Sports Insider

Gary Parrish is an award-winning college basketball columnist and television analyst for CBS Sports who also hosts the highest-rated afternoon drive radio show in Memphis, where he lives with his wife... Full Bio

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