David Stern would like the NBA to go to a two-and-done NBA draft philosophy

By Matt Norlander | College Basketball Writer
Not only does Stern like the idea of a two-and-done, he'd clearly like to see it sooner rather than later. (Getty Images)

Just because it's a tired topic doesn't mean it's ever going away, not until it changes. And then we can bicker and argue about it all over again, but in a sort-of brand-new way. I'm referring to the one thing that links college basketball and the NBA together for better -- but mostly for worse. The one-and-done rule. It's the NBA's rule, but the league's commissioner hardly heartily backs the philosophy.

That's because he wants another year tacked on.

Stern's been open to this philosophy before, but he reiterated his desire to see a one-year increase on the waiting game at the NBA level Friday on "The Dan Patrick Show." In talking about Anthony Davis' draft prospect and the general feeling around the NBA lottery (and teams tanking), Patrick got to asking Stern about how the draft operates and the rules in place.

With the current collective bargaining agreement, the rule remains that a player must be one year removed from his high school graduation or be 19 years old (if he didn't graduate) to enter the draft. Patrick asked Stern: from now until the end of Stern's run as commish, would we see the one-and-done rule changed in any way? Stern said he didn't know. He's putting all the onus on the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA).

"I don't know the answer to that. I think it would be a great idea to change it to two-and-done," Stern said. "Everyone I hear from -- NBA players, actually; college coaches; NBA teams -- everyone says it's a pretty good idea, except the [NBPA], whose consent is necessary to change it. So, what I tell people to do is, 'Don't call me, call their union.'"

What about a complete reversal: allowing kids to come out of high school again? Not happening, not while Stern's around at the very least.

"My reaction to that is, we have the current rule, which is one year form high school ... because it's good for our business," Stern said. "We didn't do it to help or hurt the colleges. Any college could decide not to take a player who was likely to leave after a year, but indeed it would probably cost the college president his job."

To listen to the segment, click here, and the particular quotes above come in shortly after the 8:30 mark.

Stern's pretty level-headed about this, and in fact it's nothing but great for the NBA. The savvier, more chiseled, more well-rounded players he can bring into his league, the better the league is for it. Unfair to the talented ones who are able to play with the best at 17, 18 years old? Sure, but both products remain enhanced because of the rule.

And I'm not sure when the union will opt to raise the entrance level one more year, but I think we're headed that way. I think that's a part of Stern's legacy he'd like to leave behind. He's let his stance be known, and now only one particular group is left to actually put it into action.
 
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