Cotton Bowl CEO looking forward to 'opportunities' in new playoff

By Chip Patterson | College Football/Basketball Writer

College football has the playoff fans have been asking for, but there are still plenty of big decisions left to determine how this new model will look after the 2014 season. Among them is the selection of the six existing bowls that will serve as rotating hosts for the national semifinals.


It is likely that four of those bowls will be the existing BCS bowls: Orange, Sugar, Rose, Fiesta. But that still leaves two spots in the the group of semifinals bowls, and you can bet the Cotton Bowl -- currently No. 2 Big 12 selection against the No. 3 or No. 4 SEC selection -- is interested in getting a piece of the action.

More on BCS meetings


"It's a great day for college football. We congratulate the conference commissioners and presidents for their diligent work to enhance the post season," said Rick Baker, Cotton Bowl CEO. "We look forward to learning more about the opportunities that will be created by today's announcement. With partners like AT&T and Cowboys Stadium, we believe we have a great story to tell."

That official statement, released Tuesday evening, was the first of what many expect to be many public and private pitches to claim semifinal hosting responsibilities. On Tuesday, Orlando, Orange County Mayors approved renovations to Florida Citrus Stadium -- currently the host of both the Capital One and Russell Athletic bowls. You can bet Orlando has significant interest in "opportunities" created by the new playoff as well.

Yahoo! Sports' Dan Wetzel pointed out in his column that the Cotton Bowl CEO has had a change of heart regarding the postseason in the last two years.

"A playoff system would ruin the AT&T Cotton Bowl Classic," Baker said in 2010.

There are open seats at the big-boy bowl table, and any city with a shot will be taking action and making their pitch. Why? Probably because the pie -- Sporting News reporting Tuesday the television rights could be sold for as much as $500 million per year -- has gotten much bigger.

 
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