Investigation into World Cup bidding corruption won't be made public

By Evan Hilbert | CBSSports.com

sepp blatter
Sepp Blatter and FIFA must decide the fate of two future World Cups. (Getty Images)

Back in April, former United States prosecutor Michael Garcia was chosen to head an investigation into corruption allegations regarding the vote awarding future World Cups to Russia and Qatar.

On Monday Around the Rings reported that Garcia's report will not be made public. So much for any pretense of FIFA transparency.

"We have no update concerning the delivery of the report of the investigatory chamber of the independent ethics committee," a FIFA spokesman told Around the Rings. "Please note that in accordance with art 28 and 36 of the FIFA Code of Ethics the report will be handed over to the adjudicatory chamber but only the final decision of the adjudicatory chamber may be made public."

Essentially, whatever is decided after the investigation will be announced, though whatever Garcia finds will not. So, hypothetically, Garcia could unearth evidence of corruption and recommend that the vote to award Qatar and Russia the tournament be nullified. FIFA, however, could decide to keep the tournaments as is and honor the previous vote.

In this case, only the decision to keep the World Cup in Russia in 2018 and Qatar and '22 will be announced to the public.

FIFA announced Monday that the report from the ethics committee is expected in September.

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