Blog Entry

Week 1: New Versus Old

Posted on: September 13, 2009 6:58 pm
Edited on: September 13, 2009 7:16 pm
 
After months of training camp, preseason games, and quarterback controversy, the 2009 regular season is finally here. For the Cleveland Browns, that means the start of what figures to be another roller coaster season.

Like any roller coaster, this one begins at the bottom.

The very bottom.

Miscommunication, penalties, and one inexperienced quarterback contributed to a 20-34 loss to the Minnesota Vikings.

Today’s football game featured a distinct balance between new and old.

New Browns head coach Eric Mangini began his second stint as head coach by facing an old foe – Brett Favre.  Entering his 19th season in the NFL, the ageless Favre made his unprecedented 270th consecutive start behind center – an NFL record. Favre silenced his critics and played within himself for the majority of the game. Although he wasn’t perfect, Favre played well enough to escape Cleveland with a win.

Opposing Favre was newly appointed Browns starting quarterback, Brady Quinn. Heading into his 3rd season in the league, Quinn made his 5th career start…and it showed. Quinn finished the day completing 21 of 35 passes for 205 yards. He threw for a touchdown, but turned the ball over twice. As strange as it may sound, the statistics were actually the highlight of his performance.

Quinn’s conservative approach to the game seemed to match that taken by offensive coordinator, Brian Daboll. When afforded time in the pocket, Quinn rarely took any shots down field. He opted for short completions to running backs and tight ends instead of utilizing the team’s biggest weapons in Josh Cribbs and Braylon Edwards. The two receivers finished with a combined 3 receptions for 22 yards.

Contrasting the quarterbacks were two running backs at different ends of their careers.

Starting at running back for the Minnesota Vikings was the explosive Adrian Peterson. At 24, Adrian Peterson has already cemented himself as one of, if not the premier running back of the day. Peterson certainly looked the part as he carried the ball 25 times for a whopping 180 yards. Most of that running came behind the best run-blocking offensive line in football.

The most recent running back to lead the league in rushing faced off against one of the old ones. Just weeks removed from his 30th birthday, Jamal Lewis was unable to match the effort of his successor. Lewis and the Browns were able to find running room early, but it was too little too late. The game's score took the Browns out of running situations, and that proved to be the difference in the game.




The Cleveland Browns’ 2009 season began with a disappointing loss. There were, however, several things to take away from this game. They say those who do not learn from their mistakes are doomed to repeat them. In that spirit, I present the top 10 things I’ve learned from Vikings/Browns...

10. Brian Daboll will run a conservative, West Coast offense.


Whether it's the 2nd & 16 toss to Jamal Lewis or the 2nd & 15 draw to James Davis, Brian Daboll's offensive playcalling was extremely simple. Although Daboll took advantage of Josh Cribbs in the wildcat, his offense looked flat. Some of that falls on Brady Quinn's decision making, but the majority of the blame rests on Dabolls well-rounded shoulders.

9. Adrian Peterson is very, very good.


Sometimes you have to experience an event first-hand to appreciate just what you're witnessing. There is no question that Adrian Peterson is a special player, but I have gained an in-depth scope as to the depth of his talents. He possesses superior vision, balance, strength, agility, and acceleration to any runner I have ever seen. Peterson is without a doubt the best running back in the league.

8. The Browns will be competitive this season.


Heading into this game, you would be hard-pressed to find a fan or analyst that gave Cleveland a chance. The Browns limited Peterson to an astounding 25 yards on 11 carries through the first half of the football game. Minnesota actually trailed 13-10 at halftime. Had the Browns played first-half football through all four quarters, they would have walked away as winners.

7. Kamerion Wimbley has emerged as a solid outside linebacker.


Wimbley had a strong training camp and performed well throughout the preseason. It was nice to see him continue playing at a high level entering the regular season. Wimbley was a big reason Peterson was ineffective through the first half. He played a very disciplined football game - maintaining his containment while remaining active in pursuit.

6. Rob Ryan loves blitzing defensive backs.


It's a trait we saw in Oakland and something that has continued in Cleveland. Ryan pressured Brett Favre by sending defensive backs to the quarterback early and often. Abram Elam, Brodney Pool, and Brandon McDonald, were all very active around the line of scrimmage. Both safties recorded sacks today in what figures to the the first of many.

5. The Cleveland Browns have the best special teams unit in the league.


That statement is no exaggeration - the Browns possess one of the most balanced and explosive special teams units in the NFL. Dave Zastudil and the punting until were able to keep the Vikings deep for the majority of the game. Phil Dawson consistently sent kicks deep into the endzone. Josh Cribbs was explosive. That, plus outstanding kick coverage makes Cleveland one of the most dangerous teams in that element of the game.

4. Joe Thomas is an outstanding left tackle.


Jared Allen was embarrassed today. Joe Thomas neutralized the Pro Bowl defensive end in pass rush situations and manhandled him against the run. Allen finished the day with 0.5 tackles and no quarterback sacks. In his 3rd season in the league, Joe Thomas has already cemented his name among the elite tackles in the game.

3. The Browns need to work on penalties and discipline.


Cleveland finished the day with 8 penalties for 66 yards. Some of the penalties were the result of mental mistakes, but others were issues with technique. Knowing Eric Mangini, this team should have those cleaned up by next week, but it was shocking to see, to say the least.

2. Shaun Rogers is healthy...and back to form.


Any time you have a nose tackle who consistently commands double and triple teams, you have the start of a great defense. Rogers was extremely disruptive all game. He played a large role in stopping Peterson early, and he helped generate pressure on obvious passing situations. Rogers should find his way back to Hawaii at the end of the season.

1. Brady Quinn is an average quarterback.


You can't have success in the NFL without balance, and Brady Quinn is not a balanced passer. Quinn has consistently struggled with the deep ball - something that hurt him when driving during the final minutes of play. Quinn chose to attempt only high percentage passes. This strategy worked early, but it backfired late in the game. When the Browns were faced with obvious passing situations, Quinn could not deliver. For Quinn and the Browns to be successful, he'll need to get the wide receivers involved and stretch the field.




Comments

Since: Mar 23, 2007
Posted on: September 16, 2009 3:51 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

Unless a miracle happens and Quinn learns how to make NFL throws, there's little hope for this team.
Cheeks, This is all pointless your still just being a close minded Anderson honk. I'm just going to have to ignore you now. At least until enough of the season has pass that We can make an honest assessment of Quinns performance. I'm sure that by the end of the season Quinn will have proven weather or not Mangini made the right call. I'd ask if you wanted to make a bet on the out come, but I know from your track record that you'd just welch again.



Since: Mar 23, 2007
Posted on: September 16, 2009 3:10 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

 Cannibal,

What have you seen in Brady Quinn that gives you hope for the future? In all honesty, I can't see anything.

There were no elements of a vertical passing game. There were inaccurate throws both short and deep. There was a weird reluctance to take shots down the field...when we were trailing by 11 points late.





1. He reads the Defense and uses his check downs. Nice to see after Cannon Anderson just tried to throw it past everyone.
 2. Ran a hurry up offense out of shot gun with rookie center. Anderson would have took a few delay of game penalties for sure. 3. Completing passes, He's getting it done unlike .... you guessed it Crack under presser Anderson.  I'm sure you see your deeper passing game if Defenses play him tight to cut of the short passes as your claiming they will. If he doesn't work out at the end of the year pull the trigger move on and draft Colt Mccoy.
We don't need a super star at QB to succeed. IE Trent Dilfer, Neil O' Donald, etc... I'm not saying he might not develop into one given a chance but We can't have the mistakes and high turn over rate of your hero .... Mr Anderson.The only real problem I had with his performance was the fumble on the scramble. If it becomes a habit, I'll be the first to move on at the position. Speaking of moving on, shouldn't you be accepting the fact that Anderson is done here in Cleveland.



Since: Oct 15, 2007
Posted on: September 16, 2009 2:44 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

OK fine, you tell me - which standard are we going to use?

Are we going to use my 2-year standard to evaluate quarterbacks or are we going to use the "judge-on-every-game-without-t
a

king-anything-into-context" standard that I had to deal with when Anderson was at the helm.

I find it curious that no one cared for my 2-year standard until Quinn looked awful against the Vikings.
We use the standard that each of us believes in.  You believe in a 2 year evaluation, and I believe in 1.  Remember, Anderson had a year under center in 2007, hence why we were all critical of him.  I will still be critical of Quinn this year, because he has had some experience.

The Browns are going backwards instead of forward. Now we have to go through another season of dumb mistakes while we watch this guy learn on the job.

Why would ANYONE want that?
Because ANDERSON HAS PROVEN HE CANNOT HANDLE THE JOB!  Why can't you see that?  Every analyst, sportswriter, fan, and coach sees and believes this but you...

You, Sir, like to argue, and like to create controversy.  That is why you do this, and you are no better than Chazz for that reason. 

I am done...



Since: Mar 19, 2007
Posted on: September 16, 2009 2:24 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

A good performance doesn't necessarily include lighting up the scoreboard. A good performance includes taking care of the football, managing the game, making good decisions, and giving the team a chance to win at the end of the game.


I agree with you Cheeks, we do both Quinn and Anderson a disservice by focusing on individual statistics. But here's the one that counts for me - points.


In 8 starts last year, DA engineered the Browns to a total of 142 points (approximately 18 a game)

In 2 starts last year, BQ engineered the Browns to a total of 59 points (approximately 30 a game)

Now, I didn't go back and look at all 8 games that Anderson started, but I know that not all those points were scored by the offense (Eric Wright's interception comes to mind). But even giving him all of those points, with Brady Quinn in the game we averaged 12 points a game more!

If I do a crude statistical analysis and throw out the low and high games for DA (6 and 35). I come up with 101 points in 6 games which makes his total about the same 16.5 or so a game.

Now here's where it gets really interesting.

The last 8 games of 2007, that I said foreshadowed 2008, the offense scored a total of 147 points. And again, I'm giving him credit for all the points.
Take out the outliers (8 and 33) and you get 101 points - in six games: identical to 2008.

And one more, the first seven games of 2007 (not counting the infamous coin toss game) - the Anderson-led Browns average over 30 points a game. Take out the outliers and it's still 25 points. That means in the last half of 2007 and the first half of 2008, the Browns averaged nearly ten points less per game!

Defenses made adjustments. Anderson failed to adjust back.

Here's one more thing and you'll have to take my word on this. I just did this analysis to confirm what my gut was telling me. Even I'm amazed at how clear the case is to give Quinn a chance.

And I have to add, that Belichick coached two more seasons in Cleveland after releasing Bernie. It was his disagreement with Art over Andre "Bad Moon" Rison that cinched his fate, I believe (I could have that wrong).

I need to stop doing this, it's giving me a headache.



Since: Jun 30, 2008
Posted on: September 16, 2009 2:00 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

Cannibal,

What have you seen in Brady Quinn that gives you hope for the future? In all honesty, I can't see anything.

There were no elements of a vertical passing game. There were inaccurate throws both short and deep. There was a weird reluctance to take shots down the field...when we were trailing by 11 points late.

I'll give Edwards credit for taking the blame on the interception but in truth I blame Mangini. If Quinn and Edwards had more play time together It might not have happened. How much more playing time do you want?

Quinn and Edwards had the entire offseason to develop chemistry. They worked together in training camp and throughout the preseason.

This is a grown man's game. If Quinn is not professional enough to feel comfortable with his receivers, then he's less of a quarterback than even I imagined.


Well arn't you the little doomsaier. I'm far more optimistic, give the team a chance to play. The red flags are up.

Unless a miracle happens and Quinn learns how to make NFL throws, there's little hope for this team. You mention we played the Vikings defense?

Baltimore and Pittsburgh are both better than Minnesota, and Quinn will have to see them 4 times each year.







Since: Jun 30, 2008
Posted on: September 16, 2009 1:49 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

You concede this once the QB you DON'T want is at the helm...yet last year when we all criticized DA your were quick to judge us. OK fine, you tell me - which standard are we going to use?

Are we going to use my 2-year standard to evaluate quarterbacks or are we going to use the "judge-on-every-game-without-t
a
king-anything-into-context" standard that I had to deal with when Anderson was at the helm.

I find it curious that no one cared for my 2-year standard until Quinn looked awful against the Vikings.

Tell me, if you now concede this, how do you make ANY argument for DA based on his past performances? Derek Anderson had about two years worth of time to learn what it takes to be an NFL starting quarterback.

I'll even grant you that Quinn could do the same, but that's another 2 FULL YEARS that the Browns shouldn't have to spend. We had a guy who has experience playing against the top tier defenses in the NFL. We had a guy who had years of experience with our top playmaker Braylon Edwards. We had a guy who already made his rookie mistakes.

Brady Quinn has NO experience playing against top tier defenses. He has NO experience going through a season with Braylon Edwards. He still has to make his ROOKIE MISTAKES.

The Browns are going backwards instead of forward. Now we have to go through another season of dumb mistakes while we watch this guy learn on the job.

Why would ANYONE want that?




Since: Mar 23, 2007
Posted on: September 16, 2009 1:49 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

  The only thing I'm wrong about is saying Anderson would get the start at quarterback. I didn't take into account the politics behind the decision. I assumed Mangini would do what's best for the Cleveland Browns...

Your wrong in your assessment that Anderson is a probowl QB, He's not. The dink and dunk throws your complaining about with Quinn making are throws that Anderson screws up on a regular bases. Mangini did make the best decision for the Cleveland Browns 
Even you, Cannibal, have to admit Brady Quinn had a terrible performance last weekend.

He didn't have a great game but I'm not ready to throw him under the bus after one start against the Vikings defense.

Chemistry only goes so far.


Yes it does and Mangini made a mistake by not naming Quinn the starter sooner. I'll give Edwards credit for taking the blame on the interception but in truth I blame Mangini. If Quinn and Edwards had more play time together It might not have happened. 

I address all issues regarding the Cleveland Browns. Quinn is our quarterback, and I will remain hyper- critical of him until he proves otherwise.

I fixed it for you.   People need to stop beating around the bushes. I haven't seen anything in Quinn that makes me feel optimistic for the future.

Your not looking.
The Cleveland Browns are in trouble.

Well arn't you the little doomsaier. I'm far more optimistic, give the team a chance to play.
 



Since: Jun 30, 2008
Posted on: September 16, 2009 1:34 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

BKM,

Anytime you score 4 rushing TD's, its hard to lose a football game.  Part of being a NFL starting caliber QB is managing the game.  When your starting RB gives you 28 points, you are expepcted to win.  DA did that here, despite throwing 0 TD's and a pick.  Not a bad game, but certainly not a game you should point out as a stand-out game. The first sentence here really does it.

I'll say it again: Derek Anderson lead three drives from his own 31, 46, and 11 yard line. Jamal Lewis finished those drives, but Anderson engineered them. Those 4TDs were a direct result of the work Anderson put in to get to the goal line. Lewis just happened to finish them.

When your starting RB gives you 28 points, you are expepcted to win WHO scored the touchdown doesn't matter.

Chudzinski could have very well called 4 play-action passes and DA could have put up 4 TDs... DA managed the game and lead the offense to points. That's all that matters.

Doesn't matter if your playing an elite defense or not, you are still expected to produce. I agree with this statement, but you're not being realistic.

It's very difficult to avoid turnovers against a team as talented as Pittsburgh. (We'll find that out this year when Quinn plays the Steelers) Leading three scoring drives on the road against arguably the strongest team in the NFL is impressive.

123 yards, a less than 50% completion percentage, and a pathetic performance in the second half will not cut it for me.  Anderson simply did not get it done in the second half. Your expectations are not realistic. Sure, I'd like to see the Browns' QB throw for 350 yards, 4TDs, and 0INTs against the Steelers, but that's just not going to happen.

With a good team like Pittsburgh, you're not going to see those video game statistics that you seem to demand from a franchise quarterback.

QB's are expected to produce no matter who they are playing.  0 TD's and an INT is not acceptable.  I say the same thing for Quinn...not acceptable.
Yes they are, but that depends on external factors.

I'm not going to expect DA to produce the same at home against the Lions as I would on the road against the Steelers.

DA's first touchdown was when Jamal Lewis made something out of nothing on a screen play, he threw another interception, managed a measley 55% completion percentage, and couldn't even hang 200 yards on the 4-12 Jets! BKM...please try to think outside of the box!

Completion percentages are a product of team production, game plans, and the defense they are facing for the week. You continue to point toward completion percentage like it's the most important statistic in the world.

It's not.

If a QB completes 26 of 30 passes for 90 yards, how much good does that do the team?

Passing yards are viewed in the same light. If a QB throws for 500 yards, how much good does that do the team?

The answer to both questions depends on external factors that go beyond QB Ratings, TDs, INTs, etc.

How do you call a 55% completion percentage, 1 TD, 1 INT, and 152 measley yards playing well!  You do know that is a QB rating of 75.41 which is .3 higher than Tim Couch.  Let me guess though...Couch was a good QB too? This is not fantasy football.

A good performance doesn't necessarily include lighting up the scoreboard. A good performance includes taking care of the football, managing the game, making good decisions, and giving the team a chance to win at the end of the game.




Since: Oct 15, 2007
Posted on: September 16, 2009 1:02 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

Correct. A quarterback deserves two years as a starter before we evaluate his progress under the strict standards we use today. If we go by that, then Quinn has about a season and a half before we write him off as a bust.

The counter argument to that was made by SA among others. He and others set no grace period for quarterbacks to learn what it takes to win in the NFL.

With the success of Flacco, Ryan, Roethlisberger, and Sanchez, I've conceded this argument.

You evaluate what you see. That's what I believe.
MAN YOU HAVE NO CREDIBILITY WITH THIS STATEMENT. 

You concede this once the QB you DON'T want is at the helm...yet last year when we all criticized DA your were quick to judge us.

Tell me, if you now concede this, how do you make ANY argument for DA based on his past performances?



Since: Oct 15, 2007
Posted on: September 16, 2009 12:59 pm
 

Week 1: New Versus Old

The had a poor defense that year. Derek Anderson was there to take advantage of it.Yes, DA had a good game...too bad your referencing the first half of the season, when we are all talking about the seond half...

Any time you put the ball up 48 times , it's going to be hard to win a football game. I'm sure you don't remember, but scored 4 rushing touchdowns from inside the 5 that game. Derek Anderson lead 3 drives from his own 31, 46, and 11 yard line - all of which resulted in touchdowns. The stats don't show it, but Anderson really had a good game.
Anytime you score 4 rushing TD's, its hard to lose a football game.  Part of being a NFL starting caliber QB is managing the game.  When your starting RB gives you 28 points, you are expepcted to win.  DA did that here, despite throwing 0 TD's and a pick.  Not a bad game, but certainly not a game you should point out as a stand-out game.

I'll tell you what, if I could guarantee that performance from a quarterback every time we played the on the road , I'd take it. Sure the completion percentage was low, but that's what happens when you face an elite NFL defense. More importantly, Anderson did not turn the ball over on the road. When you do that, good things will follow.
This is a poor argument cheeks.  Doesn't matter if your playing an elite defense or not, you are still expected to produce.  3 TD's...great.  1 of them was a spectacular catch by Braylon Edwards.  123 yards, a less than 50% completion percentage, and a pathetic performance in the second half will not cut it for me.  Anderson simply did not get it done in the second half.  If you say that is what you want every performance against the Steelers, then you are not a Browns fan.

This was the "stanchion" game. People are so quick to dismiss this as Andeson having "a down year," but the players were still there. (who picked him off) was still on the field. was still on the field. Chris McAllister, , , , , , and Rex Ryan were all there. The Baltimore defensive scheme was there. Anderson had a good game against a talented defense and engineered a game-winning touchdown drive in overtime. That's good enough for me.For starters, Anderson did not engineer a "game-winning" touchdown drive in overtime.  He got them down to about the 15 yard line and then Phil Dawson capped it off.  Dawson is also the one who saved the game with the game-tying field goal.  Once again you use the poor argument that Baltimore had an elite defense...just stop it.  QB's are expected to produce no matter who they are playing.  0 TD's and an INT is not acceptable.  I say the same thing for Quinn...not acceptable.

The weren't great that year, but Derek Anderson proved the Browns could win the games they're supposed to. The defense played well - intercepting Schaub twice, and set the Browns up in good field position. Andeson played smart situational football (there that phrase is again) and virtually all of his short drives resulted in points.
Anderson had a decent game here, but still turned the ball over.  The Browns won this game with the help of Matt Schaub, although Anderson played a decent game here.

Statistically, DA didn't have a great game. Rod Hood jumped a curl for 7 points the other way. Anderson fumbled a snap and finished the day with three turnovers. A truly bad game. Despite this, the team had a chance to win it at the end on that famous non-call of K2's force out.
Hmmm...statistically DA didn't have a great game.  He gave up a pick 6, stalled out a drive at the end of the game, committed multiple turnovers (I think your off, I found only 2), passed for BARELY over 150 yards, and BARELY over a 50% completion percentage. DA had a bad game...similar to his entire 2008 season which you ALWAYS fail to talk about...Don't worry...I will...

This is the crowning piece of evidence I hold when I proclaim DA to be the starter. Anderson's leadership really showed against Eric Mangini's defense, as the Browns won in New York, 24-18. Anderson's two touchdown drives were of 80 and 61 yards, respectively. The interception came on a toss up play at the end of the half. Even though the ' record wasn't great, they ran Mangini's schemes and DA found a way to lead the team toward victory.If this is your crowning piece of evidence you are in trouble.  DA's first touchdown was when Jamal Lewis made something out of nothing on a screen play, he threw another interception, managed a measley 55% completion percentage, and couldn't even hang 200 yards on the 4-12 Jets!  Again, poor crowning piece of evidence cheeks...poor.

No one in their right mind can interpret anything from this game. This was the snow game where conditions were horrendous. I think this was the game where coaches threw away the tape because there was nothing to gather from watching it.
Agreed.

Ahh yes, everyone's favorite game. the Cincinnati game . DA threw a career high 4 interceptions in swirling winds (Palmer struggled as well: 11 for 21, 115 yards, 1TD, 2INT) and the Browns lost a crucial game. DA made two poor throws (one was behind Lewis and another was a misread of zone coverage) and the Browns trailed 0-19 at half.  The third interception came on a poorly thrown tipped ball to Winslow and the last was a jumped curl route. Thanks to in large part to the conditions and the defense, the Browns still had a chance to win at the end. The pressure got to the 24-year-old QB, and he lost his first "big game" as a pro.
Actually, since I AM a Browns fan, this was my LEAST favorite game of 2007.  This game costed us the division crown...this game costed us a trip to the playoffs...this game broke the hearts of Browns fans across the nation.  DA crumbled under the pressure, which is what he did last season as well.  He could not handle a mediocre Bengals defense, he made 4 poor throws, numerous poor reads, bad decisions, and costed us the playoffs...conditions my arse...Palmer played bad all year that year...Anderson just stunk it up.  His lost his first "big game" as a pro...the first of many to come...

In a meaningless game, Anderson plays well against the lowly

What is wrong with you!  How do you call a 55% completion percentage, 1 TD, 1 INT, and 152 measley yards playing well!  You do know that is a QB rating of 75.41 which is .3 higher than Tim Couch.  Let me guess though...Couch was a good QB too?


Now to all the games of 2008 that you forget to address...

 

Week 1 versus the Dallas Cowboys.
Anderson - 11 of 24 (46% completion percentage), 114 yards, 1 TD.  73.95 passer rating.

This was the first big game of the year, an opener at home with high expectations.  The Browns hadn't won a home opener in years and there were expectations that we were an up and coming team...FLOP!

Week 2 versus the Pittsburgh Steelers
Anderson - 18 of 32 (57% completion percentage), 166 yards, 2 INT.  44.53 passer rating.

Prime time game against our arch rival.  Thankfully for me my power went out, and I didn't have to witness this poor performance.  Somehow the team stayed in the game, but Anderson once again flopped in a big game.

Week 3 versus the Baltimore Ravens
Anderson - 14 of 37 (38% completion percentage), 125 yards, 1 TD, 3 INT.  22.91 passer rating. 

Week 3, against another big division rival coming off of a terrible season.  Anderson puts the ball up almost 40 times and completes only 14.  3 INT's thrown.  Poor game, but again, that is what Anderson does...

Week 4 versus the Cincinatti Bengals
Anderson - 15 of 24 (63% completion percentage), 138 yards, 1 TD, 1 INT.  74.65 passer rating.

Anderson has a decent game, but nowhere near good enough for a starting QB.

Week 6 versus the NY Giants
Anderson - 18 of 29 (62%completion percentage), 310 yards, 2 TD, 0 INT.  121.33 passer rating.

Finaly! The Anderson we were hoping for!  He finaly produces after an extra week of practice!  Good things to come right...wrong...

Week 7 versus the Redskins
Anderson - 14 of 37 (38% completion percentage), 136 yards, 1 TD, 0 INT.  57.93 passer rating.

Back to earth.

Week 8 versus the Jaguars
Anderson - 14 of 27 (52% completion percentage), 246 yards 1 TD, 0 INT.  95.60 passer rating.

Not bad overall rating, but completion percentage was again pathetic.

Week 9 versus the Ravens
Anderson - 17 of 33 (52% completion percentage), 219 yards, 2 TD's, 1 INT (returned for TD).  80.23 passer rating.

Lost the game at the end with a pick 6.  Anderson is finaly yanked at this point and the future of the Cleveland Browns takes over, only to eventually get hurt.  For ****s and giggles, lets look at what Anderson did when he cam back in relief of Quinn...

Against the Texans - 5 of 14 for 51 yards and an INT.
Against the Colts - 16 of 26 for 110 yards.

Sorry...since week 8 last year, this is Anderson's stat line:

Completions - 321
Attempts - 601
Yards - 3,655
TD's - 21
INT's - 20
Passer Rating - 69.71 which is less then the hated Tim Couch's.

Therefore:

You like Derek Anderson

Derek Anderson is inferior to Tim Couch

You must LOVE Tim Couch then

Correct...



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