Blog Entry

So long, 'Zo

Posted on: January 22, 2009 2:49 pm
 

What a ride, indeed.

Alonzo Mourning went out Thursday with the same class he carried through his 15-year NBA career.

You can't say enough about the courage Mourning displayed in returning to the league after undergoing a kidney transplant in 2003. Thousands of those affected by kidney disease were, and still are inspired by him. If Mourning's off-the-court record is any indication, he'll continue to find ways to inspire for years to come.

The final blow came in the form of ruptured quadriceps and patellar tendons in 2007. Despite the fact that surgeons warned Mourning he may never walk again, he held out hope of returning to the court. The Miami Heat even kept a locker waiting for him.

It wasn't meant to be. At 38, Mourning walks away. He has 1) nothing to be ashamed of, and 2) nothing left. He left it all on the floor. 

Is he a Hall of Famer? Maybe, maybe not. Mourning finishes his career 10th in NBA history with 2,356 blocked shots and 77th with 7,137 rebounds. He was a seven-time All-Star, two-time defensive player of the year, and all-time great for reasons that go way beyond putting the ball in the basket.

Good luck, Zo. You'll be missed. Whenever I watch someone drive unimpeded to the basket for an uncontested layup -- which only happens about 500 times a week -- I'll think of No. 33

 

Category: NBA
Comments

Since: Sep 22, 2008
Posted on: January 22, 2009 4:52 pm
 

So long, 'Zo

Here's the link to the story on the CBC website when the Raptors bought him out.  It clearly states how he refuses to play for the Raptors, and further points out how he demanded a trade out of new Jersey to a contender early in the year.  Since Toronto wasn't a contender, he refused to report.  Classy. 

 




Since: Jan 14, 2008
Posted on: January 22, 2009 4:39 pm
 

So long, 'Zo

You are also not getting your facts right. Alonzo Mourning refused to ever report to the Toronto Raptors, so it doesn't really matter that the Raptors declared him unfit to play, because he wouldn't have played for them anyway.




Since: Sep 22, 2008
Posted on: January 22, 2009 4:38 pm
 

So long, 'Zo

I would also suggest that you get your facts straight.  Mourning refused to report to the Raptors after the trade.  Given that 'Zo was refusing to play for the Raptors, they did what could and bought out his contract to save some money.

Mourning was acquired by Toronto from New Jersey along with Eric Williams, Aaron Williams and two first-round draft picks for Vince Carter on Dec. 17, 2004.

But he refused to report to the Raptors, and negotiated a buyout on the more than $17 million US he was owned on a four-year, $22.6-million US contract he signed with the Nets on July 16, 2003.




Since: Oct 30, 2006
Posted on: January 22, 2009 4:15 pm
 

So long, 'Zo

LEARN THE FACTS BEFORE YOU WRONGLY BASH A GOOD MAN>>>  Toronto gave up on him!!! they bought him out because they did not want to wait and see if he can play again & they were WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!

“Since the trade, we have taken the time to fully understand Alonzo’s medical situation. Our doctors have thoroughly reviewed his records and consulted with other independent specialists and have determined that Alonzo does not meet our medical conditions to play for our basketball team,” said Raptors General Manager Rob Babcock. “While we realize it may be possible for him to play in limited circumstances, we’ve been able to confirm our expectations that because of his medical issues he would not be able to fit into our long-term strategy of building something sustainable.

GO HEAT!!!!!!!!




Since: Sep 22, 2008
Posted on: January 22, 2009 3:03 pm
 

So long, 'Zo

> He has 

> 1) nothing to be ashamed of

Does refusing to play for the Toronto Raptors, being declared medically unable to play because of his kidney condition, getting a buy-out, and then signing a deal with Miami Heat the next day not fall into the category of "things to be ashamed of" ?

 



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