Blog Entry

Lockout means Supp. prospects may not slip

Posted on: June 2, 2011 2:06 pm
Edited on: June 2, 2011 8:46 pm
 
Jim Tressel's resignation has fueled a great deal of speculation that five of his former players might make the jump into the NFL's supplemental draft.

I've been asked by many as to my thoughts on QB Terrelle Pryor, OT Mike Adams, RB Dan Herron, WR Devier Posey and DE Solomon Thomas and how each might project to the NFL.

When the initial news broke in December that these players were going to be suspended, I argued that Adams was the most intriguing pro prospect of the bunch at the time. Adams is NFLDraftScout.com's No. 2 rated senior offensive tackle heading into the season.

One of the points I tried to make to others writing stories on the "Ohio State five" and any other potential supplemental draft prospects is that historically players drafted in July have a tendency to slip further than their grades might indicate. Put simply, teams are hesitant to give up April draft picks for players selected in the Supplemental Draft. Often players would slip a round or two further down the board in July than where they would have been picked in April.

Due to the lockout, however, this year's Supplemental Draft could be different, if NFL sources are to believed.

The primary reason why supplemental prospects have a tendency to drop, I'm told, is that typically they are far behind the rookies drafted in April. The April rookies generally have a significant advantage over any players drafted in July as they typically have been able to participate in a few mini camps.

That, of course, has not yet occurred for the Class of 2011 rookies, as they and veteran players haven't had any sustained contact with their NFL coaching staffs.

Therefore, the disadvantage that supplemental prospects would typically have is gone, making any who apply to the NFL for special eligibility this year potentially graded (and drafted) higher than they would in most July drafts.
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