Blog Entry

The transition of the athlete from high school

Posted on: April 1, 2010 12:48 pm
 
The argument is always when should an athlete be eligible to declare for the professional ranks? One side of the argument is the money side of things. If a young athlete comes directly out of high school they will be rewarded with millions of dollars in contracts. Further more, if a player HAS to be in college for at least a year, and they get injured, they miss out on the aforementioned money.

You have go to be kidding me!

Last time I checked, such privileges are earned, not rewarded. Let me ask you this, If an athlete were to HAVE to go to college and misfortune struck in the form of injury, what stops them from growing as a person by attending classes? I understand that becoming a professional athlete is an admiration of nearly every kid in America, but where do you draw the line? I think a player is first, and foremost, a student-athlete. You learn to succeed at life by giving yourself the opportunity to grow. If a person goes into the pro's straight out of high school and busts, where do they turn to for a career after the pro's? With no formal education, there are very few options.

I think that the NCAA, along with all professional sports, should prepare young men and women for a future outside of sports before allowing them for advancement in any field of professionalism. This most recently came to fruition during the NCAA tournament when talk stirred of requiring graduation rates to be at a certain level to become eligible for the tournament. I am all for this movement. It will teach a lesson while giving opportunity to succeed in the form of a tournament berth.

In conclusion, the future of the nation is always in the hands of the youth. For us to succeed, they must learn to succeed. If we don't give them an opportunity outside of an education, they will have nowhere to turn when unattainable dreams move out of reach.

Also, If you haven't seen the movie "Coach Carter" I suggest you rent it and take in it's message.
Category: General
Tags: MLB, NBA, NCAA, NFL, NHL, WNBA
 
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