Blog Entry

Torre undecided on his future

Posted on: September 6, 2010 10:19 am
 
Joe Torre Remember when Joe Torre said he'd announce his future by Labor Day?

You know what today is? Labor Day.

So, Joe, what's up?

He's not saying.

As the Dodgers flounder, Torre's keeping quiet, offering just a "no comment."

"Because you guys know how to ask those questions and get me to say something," Torre told reporters, including the Los Angeles Times ' Helene Elliott .

Yeah, kinda because that's part of the job?

"I know it is. That's why I say I can't fight you guys. Or try to get around you," Torre said. "The only way I can get around is this. You guys are good at what you do. In due time I'll make an announcement."

According to Elliott, the reason Torre hasn't made an announcement is that he hasn't made a decision. Don Mattingly, the team's hitting coach, tells her Torre hasn't given him any hints.

"He seems relaxed as ever," Mattingly said. "I know he gets frustrated with the way we've played. But he's no different than he has been all the years I've been with him. He's solid all the time."

Said third base coach Larry Bowa, "If he doesn't come back, he's not retiring. I'm not saying he's going to manager, but he'll do something. He's got too much energy. He likes to do things."

Torre, 70, will be a free agent after the season and the Dodgers are going through the messy McCourt divorce, which seems like it'll handcuff the team during free agency season. It's far from a dream situation, but it seems the ball is in Torre's court and he doesn't seem too interested in making a move quite yet.

-- C. Trent Rosecrans

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsmlb on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed .

Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 11, 2011 3:09 pm
 

Torre undecided on his future

Privileged we all blank this key fact web-site, may possibly selected discover the software so i can be delivered because of on a regular basis.



Since: Apr 20, 2009
Posted on: September 7, 2010 9:56 am
 

Torre undecided on his future


Torre is a good man but has many weaknesses as a manager.  It's true he appears to have no concept as to how to manage a bullpen, but he also has no concept in regard to implementing field strategies.  Particularly as it applies to situational hitting and assessing the necessity for on the fly defensive field maneuvers.  When was the last time you saw Torre put on a hit and run or initiate any of a variety of aggressive offensive maneuvers avaiable to a manager in an effort to "manufacture" runs.  I understand Torre is not, by any stretch of the imagination, a "small ball" type manager, but he is completely devoid of any thought as it applies to putting forth any type of deliberate and/or methodical plan to bring accross runs.  I mean, the stolen base is virtually non-existant to Torre. 

If I had to put my finger on it, I would write it off as Torre being incapable of trusting his players.  Ballplayers, particularly young ballplayers, need a manager who is going to standby them in times of strife, and show confidence in their abilities.  Young ballplayers have a lot to deal with phsychologically in the major leagues.  The last thing they need is a manager who lacks trust in their developing abilities.  And Torre just can not help being impatiend and insecure about faltering ball players, and his tolerance is particularly shorter when they are young.  This flaw has a specific tendency to ruin young ball players.  It is a disasterous flaw for a manager because all ballplayers, old or young, star or scrub, falter at some point during a big league season.

It is this lack of trust and impatience that keeps Torre abusing that same relief pitcher time and again when he is hot, or suddenly pulling that starting pitcher after the fifth inning when there is a hint of losing the lead, even when the pitcher is going well.  It is also what causes the spastic switching from reliever to reliever trying to find one that will magically click, when there is no "to go" hot reliever to go to.  It is what causes him to lose patience with young hot stars and bench them when they are struggling.  And let's not even go into his inability to implement any type of plan to deliberately and methodically manufacture a run when needed.

Yes, it can be argued, but what about his years with the Yankees?

Truth be told, any manager would have done well with the 96' through 2000 Yankees.  They were an experience group of special "in their prime" players who needed very little direction or guidance.  They were a fine tuned machine of starters who went deep into games, followed by the "like clockwork" eight inning bridge relievers of Stanton and Nelson, and the shutdown "hall of fame" closer Mo Rivera.  They were on auto-pilot and required very little thought to maneuver.  Their offense and defense were no different.  Automatic.

After 2000, however, it was not so easy.  More shifting parts, outside stars and young ball players messing with the "chemistry."  Even so, the Yanks still had enough fire power to carry them to the playoffs every year under Torre.  And even even though the Yanks had the teams to add more rings, there would be no more rings to come.  Why?  Because in the real world, teams need "better-than-average" managing to win world series.

And a "better-than-average" manager Torre is not.






 





Since: Jun 9, 2009
Posted on: September 6, 2010 2:59 pm
 

Torre undecided on his future

Torre is terrible. Who cares if he goes? He doesn't know how to manage a bullpen, and he sits Kemp way too often.


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com