Blog Entry

Marlins closer could face jail time

Posted on: September 24, 2011 2:12 pm
 
Leo NunezBy C. Trent Rosecrans

You can look up Leo Nunez on Baseball-Reference.com, but his real name is Juan Carlos Oviedo, and that could result in the Marlins' closer spending time in jail, the Miami Herald reports.

Oviedo returned to the Dominican Republic on Thursday after the Marlins placed him on the restricted list.

A spokesperson for the Dominican Attorney General's Office, Jacqueline Lamarche, told the newspaper that Oviedo faces jail time if convicted, but didn't know if he would be charged. However, a with a false identity on his record, he could face difficulties obtaining a visa to return to the United States and play baseball, even though others have done it in the past.

Oviedo had claimed to be born in 1983 and was from Jamao del Norte, although he was born a year earlier than he claimed. He signed with the Pirates in 2000. Leo Nunez is the name of his best friend.

Hector Bienvenido Pena was arrested Friday in the Dominican Republic, charged with providing false birth certificates to Oviedo, among other players.

According to the report, Oviedo called the Dominican consulate in Miami on Sept. 7 to come clean after the Marlins had learned of his true identity.

"He came in and made a sworn declaration saying that he was not from Jamao al Norte but from Bonao, a town in the Dominican Republic, and that when he was young -- still a minor and a prospect about to be signed -- a coach who managed his league recommended that he assume another name, one of a person a year young, so that he could get a better contract," consul general Manuel Felipe told the Herald. "So he became Leonel Nunez Morales, who was his best friend since childhood. That made it easier for him, because Leonel was 16, which was the appropriate age for a Dominican baseball player."

Marlins reliever Edward Mujica told the newspaper that the age difference could cost you $100,000 or $150,000 if you're 17 and if you're 18, you'd be lucky to get $5,000 and a chance."

MLB offered amnesty to players signed under false names in 2008, but Oviedo didn't come forward at that time. Minor-league players face a one-year suspension if found to have signed under a false name, while major leaguers are subject to discipline to be determined by the commissioner's office.

Oviedo said he couldn't go to the funerals of some family members because of his assumed identity.

Oviedo has 36 saves for the Marlins this season and 92 since being acquired from the Royals in exchange for Mike Jacobs in 2008. He signed a one-year contract worth $3.65 million for 2011 and is arbitration-eligible for 2012 and could be a free agent before the 2013 season.

For more baseball news, rumors and analysis, follow @eyeonbaseball on Twitter or subscribe to the RSS feed.
Comments
hotmeuly
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 20, 2011 1:11 pm
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator



peulouy
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 18, 2011 5:50 am
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 8:05 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

That i this way web-site. Irrrll be peeping involved with it oftentimes.



Since: Aug 4, 2011
Posted on: September 25, 2011 3:34 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

lock his ass up



Since: Sep 25, 2007
Posted on: September 24, 2011 7:05 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

So long as the name change is sanctioned by a court, that is.



Since: Sep 25, 2007
Posted on: September 24, 2011 7:03 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

You don't think that working in the US under a false name isn't breaking any US law?

Do you really think not?

And do you think it's the DR that grants visas to work in the US?

You need to do a bit of research, vike. 



Since: Oct 17, 2006
Posted on: September 24, 2011 6:54 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

I don't believe that he broke any US law. The Dominican authorities are the ones that could charge him. I doubt that they will. They may make him sweat a little before granting him a visa under his real name, but in the end, he'll be back playing mediocre baseball next season. 



Since: Sep 27, 2006
Posted on: September 24, 2011 6:26 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

You gotta love guys like royalbleeder

He seems to think celebs should be above the law. Rest assured if any normal person committed such a crime he'd want to throw that person in jail. Laws are laws and all people celebs included need to abide by them. Including Roger Clemens, Barry Bonds and Michael Vick. I don't care if it's a waste of the tax payers money, they need to be punished like anyone else would for breaking the law. I think their penalties should be harder than the average person because a lot look up to them as role models and their paid to be in the spotlight at all times. So why get less punishment when their actions could make others do it as well. "Hey my role model does drugs, it's gotta be the cool thing to do." and then parents wanna know why their kids got into drugs. Hmmm maybe it's because of the celeb you wanted set free and the image he's giving the children who look up to him? Paying more money to protect the kids is well worth it.



Since: Dec 4, 2006
Posted on: September 24, 2011 5:58 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

I think there is more to it,if you want to get a bigger contract why change your age by only 1yr ? I think it is the name that he is trying to hide and what that reason is must be a big deal.



Since: Sep 14, 2006
Posted on: September 24, 2011 5:07 pm
 

Marlins closer could face jail time

if true, this is fraud. the deception was done to mask his age and obtain a bigger/longer contract.


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com