Blog Entry

Kershaw, Verlander make history

Posted on: September 27, 2011 7:17 pm
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By Matt Snyder

After falling out of playoff contention Monday night, the Angels have decided to scratch Jered Weaver from his scheduled start Wednesday (Jeff Wilson via Twitter). Since Weaver is done for the year, Tigers ace Justin Verlander has now locked up the AL lead in ERA (2.40 ... Weaver's is 2.41), wins (24, next best is 19) and strikeouts (250, next best is 230). This is known as the pitching triple crown, though it doesn't get as much attention as the hitting triple crown (which Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp still has a very-outside shot of winning).

Over in the National League, Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw has locked up the triple crown as well with 21 wins, a 2.28 ERA and 248 strikeouts. Ian Kennedy of the Diamondbacks also has 21 wins, but it still counts when a pitcher is tied for the lead.

So we have a triple crown winning pitcher in both leagues, which is amazing. It's pretty rare, too, as the last time it happened was all the way back in 1924 (ESPN Stats and Info via Twitter). In that season, Hall of Famers Dazzy Vance of the Brooklyn Robins and Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators pulled off the feat.

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Comments
hotmeuly
Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 20, 2011 11:51 am
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Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: December 7, 2011 6:49 pm
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

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Since: Feb 14, 2010
Posted on: September 29, 2011 2:35 am
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

"the mid-year acquistion of Fister will make a 1-2 punch similar to Philly."

Your joking right? I normally have a pretty good guage of sarcasm but, that one I'm not so sure about... Doug Fister is no-where near the caliber of Cliff Lee, nor Cole Hamels, and I would be hard pressed to pick him over an aging Roy Oswalt... His greatest comparison would be to that of Joe Blanton, if you wanted to match-up against Philly's staff. 



Since: Feb 14, 2010
Posted on: September 29, 2011 2:35 am
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

"the mid-year acquistion of Fister will make a 1-2 punch similar to Philly."

Your joking right? I normally have a pretty good guage of sarcasm but, that one I'm not so sure about... Doug Fister is no-where near the caliber of Cliff Lee, nor Cole Hamels, and I would be hard pressed to pick him over an aging Roy Oswalt... His greatest comparison would be to that of Joe Blanton, if you wanted to match-up against Philly's staff. 



Since: Feb 14, 2010
Posted on: September 29, 2011 2:27 am
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

I agree, I don't understand how Pitchers have such a hard time even gaining credibility for the MVP award. MVP stands for Most Valuable Player. Nowhere does it say Leagues Best Hitter. Which even with pitchers out of the equation it seems to have become. Now I am a diehard Cardinals fan, but why did Pujols win MVP in 2008? Bonds in 01' and 04'? How can you be the Most VALUABLE Player if you cant even lead your team to the playoffs in that given year. Yes, I believe stats should be a FACTOR, but success is what makes a player valueable, otherwise those stats are all for not...



Since: Nov 21, 2006
Posted on: September 29, 2011 1:16 am
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

I should also say that I am not of the belief that pitchers should be inelgible for the MVP award, just that it would take an extremely unusual combination of an extraordinary performance by a starter along with no clear cut deserving winner from the everyday pool.  The only time in the last 20 years that I can think of that being the case in either league was Pedro in 1999 when he truly had a season for the ages and was more deserving than Pudge, but got robbed by the voters.



Since: Nov 21, 2006
Posted on: September 29, 2011 1:07 am
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

My math may not be perfect, but that is the gist of my argument.



It's also inaccurate and irrelevant.  Trying to calculate the percentage of plays is meaningless.  A pitcher cannot contribute to a team winning a game he isn't pitching in.  So a starter has no chance of helping his team win 80% of its games.  80% of the team's game.  Where as an everyday player can get the day off, pinch hit in the 9th inning and hit a game winning HR on the first pitch he sees which would constitute being involved in less than 0.5% (1 out of 200+) of the pitches in the game.  An everyday player can potentially contribute to 162 wins in a season, a starter at most in the low 30's.

And it also has to be said, that in the AL at least it doesn't matter how well a pitchers pitches, he can't win a game unless his offense scores at least one run for him.  In the NL he can do it himself, but that occurs so rarely as to be irrelevant.  So offensive players can overcome a crappy pitching performance for them, but a pitcher cannot overcome his offense getting shutout.



Since: Apr 20, 2010
Posted on: September 28, 2011 9:52 pm
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

thanks  for such an outstanding point of view. your break down had me shaking my head in agreement. your comments make perfect sense considering that baseball is the only sport that the offense doesnt control the ball.  your insight is greatly appreciated .




Since: Aug 12, 2009
Posted on: September 28, 2011 8:06 pm
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

I am enjoying the over-used excuse that a starting pitcher only affects 34 or so games in a season.  What everyone fails to point out is that even the top MVP everyday players are also only positively affecting the score 15 to 20% of the time when they are in the line-up.  Consider that an everyday player only bats 4-5 times a game (in other words, he has a potential to affect the game 11% during the offensive portion of the inning), and that he gets 5-7 chances to affect a ball placed in play - unless he is a catcher or first baseman(in other words 12-15% of the defensive plays).  During a starter's game, he is involved with on average 50% of the plays (all those half-innings that he is pitching). Add to that the strikeouts that he accrues, thereby reducing the number of chances that the defensive player has to make plays.  Since teh MVP offensive candidate is rarely cited for his defense (honestly), the "everyday" player would need to accrue 4-5 days of offensive impact plays to equate to the starting pitcher's 50% impact.  My math may not be perfect, but that is the gist of my argument. 



Since: Sep 28, 2011
Posted on: September 28, 2011 7:05 pm
 

Kershaw, Verlander make history

Why aren't the Dodgers winning with all this talent?
A Cy Young winner and an MVP on the same should be able to least make them contend. But congrats to those two pitchers.



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