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Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

Posted on: November 19, 2010 6:37 pm
 
Posted by Josh Katzowitz

While expressing disappointment with rookie WR Mike Williams – who, as you know, was arrested this morning on a DUI chargeBuccaneers coach Raheem Morris also explained why he’ll start Williams on Sunday anyway.

"It’s always a tough decision when you have to make decisions about mistakes made and errors made," Morris said, via the St. Petersburg Times. "You have to make those tough decisions and I have my normal process that I go through."

OK, so Morris didn’t really explain anything. But he was also asked his thoughts about one of his standout players being out so late (Williams was arrested at 2:48 a.m. and then blew under the state legal limit on the Breathalyzer) when he was supposed to be at Tampa Bay’s practice facility at 8 a.m.

"These guys are grown men,” Morris said. “You don’t have any rules when you leave your job … It’s supposed to be common sense that you go home and get ready to play a very important football game. A bad decision by an individual player."

But the Times also speculates the Buccaneers might believe Williams’ charge ultimately will be dismissed. So, that could explain why Morris is going to “punish” Williams “internally” and not discipline him in regards to playing time.

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Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
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Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

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Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

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Posted on: December 2, 2011 7:28 pm
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

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Since: Aug 30, 2007
Posted on: November 20, 2010 12:56 am
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

As someone who works for the public defender's office, I thought I should correct your post.  Field sobriety tests ARE admissible regardless of the blood/breat test results.  A great exemple would be if a person refuses to submit to a blood/breath test.---------------
TGHJI, you work for a public defender as what? A janitor? Field sobriety tests are secondary evidence and only stand up or hold any value if someone refuses a blood or urine test. If someone refuses these tests, in some states they are admitting guilt. In others they are only discrediting their case by putting the power of judgement in the hands of a judge or prosecutor who will rely on the evidence at hand and that which was withheld or refused to be obtained. DUI is not only restricted to alcohol. So if you don't pass a field sobriety test, look stoned, and have impaired speech patterns, you will be subjected to a urine tox screen, rare, but it does happen. I think the cop just had a hard-on and wanted to make a name for himself (sad). As stated earlier, tox screens have a 24hr turnaround time and we should all know the results of his screen by Saturday afternoon (if he so chooses to have it released). 



Since: Oct 5, 2006
Posted on: November 19, 2010 11:57 pm
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

A breathalyzer is a reference that the police can use to their favor if needed. Even if someone passes the breathalyzer, they could still fail the field sobriety test. Also with the glassy eyes among other things that the police are trained to look for can give the police officer a reason to believe that the driver may be impaired under a drug.

Police are train to look for glassy eyes, how the pupil changes when their flash light his the eyes in certain directions, slurred speech or wording, flushed face, fumbling things with hands, difficulty of answering questions, the direction a person looks when lying or exaggerating the truth, body movements & other things. All of these things can give a police officer the assumption of the driver being impaired & gives them the right to do further testing (urine or blood test).

The DUI charge will be determined if dropped on what the Urine test results are. They have to have a charge to be able to do the tests. They chose DUI (Driving Under the Influence) meaning it could be impaired under any drugs. If they was charging him for drinking & driving then the charge would be DWI (Driving while Intoxicated) or OWI (Operating While Intoxicated)

Who knows if Williams took some pain killers & had a few drinks. It could still make him pass a breathalyzer but also make him too impaired to drive a car.



Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: November 19, 2010 11:46 pm
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

Actually, respect to the Bucs for going one way or the other, and not pulling this "I need him too much to actually  punish him, but I want to make it LOOK like I'm punishing him, so I'll sit him for a series" BS.
What's your problem? What did he do?  He didn't blow over the limit, if he would have I'd be all over him too. But he didn't...... so I ask again, what's the problem?  So a cop did a field sobriety test and arrested him?  How do you know the cop wasn't an idiot ??

There was no curfew and he didn't blow over...  end of story and I'll bet money the charges either get dropped or there is a plea deal with a conditional discharge...






Since: Mar 10, 2008
Posted on: November 19, 2010 11:26 pm
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

As someone who works for the public defender's office, I thought I should correct your post.  Field sobriety tests ARE admissible regardless of the blood/breat test results.  A great exemple would be if a person refuses to submit to a blood/breath test.  Also, the AG (I'm assuming you're talking about the attorney general) does not get involved with DUI cases.  If the decision is made not to file charges, it will be made by the prosecutor's office.  Try not to give legal advice or offer legal speculation unless you're sure you know what you're talking about.  It's one of my pet peeves.



Since: Jun 13, 2007
Posted on: November 19, 2010 9:52 pm
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

Field sobriety test alone is inadmissible unless the blood test and breathalyzer are over the limits.  Tough guy cop, but the AG will ultimately drop the case.  This is a waste of taxpayer's money.



Since: Jan 22, 2007
Posted on: November 19, 2010 9:11 pm
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

Actually, respect to the Bucs for going one way or the other, and not pulling this "I need him too much to actually punish him, but I want to make it LOOK like I'm punishing him, so I'll sit him for a series" BS.



Since: Sep 28, 2009
Posted on: November 19, 2010 9:02 pm
 

Raheem Morris explains Williams decision

Field sobriety tests are regularly failed by people who are sober...When walking a straight line if you raise your arms more than 6 inches from your side they count that against you. They look for many things like this without explaining to you what they are looking for. If you havent been drinking or noot over the legal limit the best thing to do is refuse the field test (you are allowed by law to refuse the field test without consequence)and just take the breathalizer. My problem is that he was out that late when he was supposed to be at the facility at 8 am.  Poor decision by a young player. Hopefully he has learned something from this and stays out of trouble.


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