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Blog Entry

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Posted on: February 22, 2011 11:25 am
 

Posted by Andy Benoit

Another day, another mediated labor negotiating session for the NFL. It’s now Day 5 in these sessions. Daniel Kaplan of the Sports Business Journal says he’s told ownership will be represented for the first time in these past five days. Thus far, only the NFLPA and NFL execs have been at the tables.

The ownership side does not mean the owners themselves. Albert Breer of NFL Network pointed out that Redskins front office exec Bruce Allen, for example, was seen walking through the door. Kaplan says no owners will be in the room.

What this all means is difficult to say. Some interpret the ownership side entering the discussion as “progress”. But others could say, Wait, we’re on Day Five and the owners themselves still aren’t in the room!? It’s possible the big issues – such as that $1 billion they’re quibbling over – still haven’t been broached.

Thus far the two sides have been good about keeping their discussions under wraps (though NFLPA PR rep George Atallah did do a live Ustream Q and A yesterday). That makes for better negotiating for the players and owners, but cloudier reporting for the media and fans.

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Category: NFL
Tags: CBA, NFL, NFLPA
 
Comments

Since: Oct 10, 2006
Posted on: February 22, 2011 8:35 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Solution- play the scabs. It worked in 1987.



Since: Oct 10, 2007
Posted on: February 22, 2011 7:56 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Take the billion they want off the top and slice it 3 ways 1/3 to the players at years end 1/3 to the owners and 1/3 to the nflpa for retiring players.Split everything else as years past and lets make a deal! Ill mediate this thing in one day! Its obvious no one wants a lockout so lets slice up the pie and get ready for the combine!



Since: Oct 20, 2006
Posted on: February 22, 2011 7:52 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Pro...spoken like a TRUE Right Winger.   It always surprises me that regular folk today attack Unions.  Had their been no Unions, there would be no American Middle Class.  The fact that these athletes bargin collectively in NO WAY makes me upset.

Listen.....YES owners make an investment to own NFL Teams...but lets  make this clear.  They did NOT create the Market...the Teams....the Franchises.....or the Sport.  They Bought a Team.   Almost any owner who buys and keeps a franchise for 10 years can sell that team for 500 times what he paid for it.  

If they cannot run the team and "NEED" to do it for the purpose of "MAKING MONEY"  sell it!  There will be 100 people lined up to buy it from them.

Players are the GAME.  No Players....NO GAME.   The players SHOULD get the Lions share of the money.  They are the people who deal with the results of playing the game years later.  Add to that, that in the NFL the contracts owners write with players are not worth the paper they are printed on, and this seems to me to be a pretty cut and dry issue.

Too me, athletes are a target in the minds of avg Americans ( 64% White ) Young Black athletes who many feel are not "INTITLED" to such huge sums of money. ( I'll get attacked for that...but I've been in too many conversations to ignore the fact that this is TRUE )


I do agree their should be a "ROOKIE SCALE" but the Union did not create the WILD Spending Owners do to build their Frachise. 

There is a HARD CAP.  If you cannot afford a guy and another owner thinks he CAN....why the hell should the Players have to supplement the Owners lack of fiscal disipline with less benifits in their short careers?

Makes no sense to me.



Since: Jun 2, 2008
Posted on: February 22, 2011 6:43 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

But everyone of those people have been to an MD to get healed.  And by the way, MD's that are at the top of their trade, get paid more than the athletes.  One quick example, Dr James Andrews,15 plus million a year, and he does that without a TV or Shoe contract.  He could even make, up to 30 million a year, with all the ancilliary people, and camps he has underneath him.  PT's at the top of their game, with several clinics underneath them, make up to 5 million a year.  Money is out there to be made, people make there choices in life on what they want, multiple choices available to Americans, Canadians, Japanese, most Europeans, and a lot of others.  It is a choice, use your athletic ability, brains, or your back, or a combination thereof.



Since: Mar 2, 2008
Posted on: February 22, 2011 5:39 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Entertainment isn't important to mankind's existence.  Check.

The E.T.s will surely enjoy this tidbit of information.



Since: Feb 22, 2011
Posted on: February 22, 2011 5:01 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Note: focke-wolf is now out trying to stop climate change cannot respond...  



Since: Aug 21, 2006
Posted on: February 22, 2011 4:59 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

The athletes make way more money than anyone in any of the actually important fields that I mentioned earlier with few exceptions. How can this be?

They generate more money in a day then anyone in any of the actually imprtant fields do in a year. Thats why they make more.  A guy like Peyton Manning puts people in the seats and generates tens of millions of dollars a year for his team if not more. Nobody pays $100 to watch a doctor heal people.



Since: Sep 10, 2006
Posted on: February 22, 2011 4:51 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Professional sports is not a career/job path providing a multitude of jobs (it is not a major employer).
Really?  I would consider prefessional sports a major employer.  You really think it only takes two teams with 53 people plus the coaching staff to put on a game?  It takes hundreds of cameras, sound guys, trainers, concession workers, parking attendents, etc.  I would say that for every major sporting event, there are around 1000 people employed directly for that event.  This doesn't take into account the other people that have jobs because of the event.  There are hotels, restraurants, bars, car rental agencies, and some other establishments that depend on these sporting events to happen in order to maintain their business all year.  It may seem weird to you, but one NFL football game has WELL over 1000 people working for it.  I would consider that a major employer.

Maybe you would like to donate every bit of money you make, over what you truely need for food, shelter, and electricity, to a non-profit?  You sure talk like the owners should.  They are the extreme, but to make a blanket statement about them not giving back is not at all true.  I would bet that every owner of an NFL team donates more money to charity EVERY year than you total for your entire life.

The owners would not be billionaires without the athletes and coaching staffs and their dedication and work.
I am pretty sure they were that way before they purchased a professional sports team, I don't think you can just walk in with a couple hundred thousand and decide to buy a NFL team.



Since: Oct 4, 2007
Posted on: February 22, 2011 4:10 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Uh Huh...or maybe that the billion $ has already been agreed in principle. Since no one is supposed to be talking about what has been or what has not been agreed upon I guess we will just make up something. Good journalism here?



Since: Jan 19, 2009
Posted on: February 22, 2011 4:05 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

it's sad how much money us fans have to spend on tickets/merchandise ect... and these owners are squabbling over pennies when it's all said and done... If they do go to lock out i hope every sponsorship pulls out of the NFL and they have the same horrible effect baseball had. I know baseball fans to this day who refuse to watch baseball because of the petty bickering that lead to a lockout...


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