Blog Entry

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Posted on: February 22, 2011 11:25 am
 

Posted by Andy Benoit

Another day, another mediated labor negotiating session for the NFL. It’s now Day 5 in these sessions. Daniel Kaplan of the Sports Business Journal says he’s told ownership will be represented for the first time in these past five days. Thus far, only the NFLPA and NFL execs have been at the tables.

The ownership side does not mean the owners themselves. Albert Breer of NFL Network pointed out that Redskins front office exec Bruce Allen, for example, was seen walking through the door. Kaplan says no owners will be in the room.

What this all means is difficult to say. Some interpret the ownership side entering the discussion as “progress”. But others could say, Wait, we’re on Day Five and the owners themselves still aren’t in the room!? It’s possible the big issues – such as that $1 billion they’re quibbling over – still haven’t been broached.

Thus far the two sides have been good about keeping their discussions under wraps (though NFLPA PR rep George Atallah did do a live Ustream Q and A yesterday). That makes for better negotiating for the players and owners, but cloudier reporting for the media and fans.

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Category: NFL
Tags: CBA, NFL, NFLPA
 
Comments

Since: Apr 27, 2008
Posted on: February 22, 2011 3:02 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Good, you hack's always muck up the waters anyways. Let them negotiate ... at more than an arm's length from the media
I was thinking exactlythe same thing.  As a fan I don't care what they discuss or when they discuss it.  I wouldn't care if I heard nothing until they announce the deal.  In fact I would prefer to hear nothing until they announce the deal because, like you said BFFL, the media always messes things up anyway. 



Since: Feb 22, 2011
Posted on: February 22, 2011 2:43 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Seriously focke-wulf? Then start your own franchise and donate all of your profits for the "good of the masses". With the exception of the Packers, the owners OWN the team.  It's theirs - not yours, not the players, not the governments. They EARNED the right to own a team by making enough money to purchase their team.  Shame on those horrible selfish people that you call "corporate America" who have the nerve to take risks and who have the drive and ambition to succeed in life.  Those horrible people already contribute a HUGE chunk of taxes that pay for transportation, medical services, education, food, water, shelter and clothing (little known fact...the government doesn't actually support anyone - they steal from the earners and give to the entitled so they can stay in power).  But shame on the owners for wanting to make money.  Shame on anyone who has aspirations to have more than anyone else.  Shame on anyone who wants to be better today than they were yesterday.  Keep teaching your kids that everything in life should be "fair" and I'll keep teaching mine that if they want something they can have it with hard work.  As long as my kids work harder and smarter than your kids they'll get want they want. Meanwhile your kids go through life just like you, telling everyone that will listen "it's just not fair!".        
;    




Since: Aug 20, 2008
Posted on: February 22, 2011 2:35 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

How can they make more money? Because ten million viewers don't tune in to watch a bus driver or to witness a woman checking in at the ER. You should probably check out the jobs that professional sports creates before commenting on that again, you will be supprised. You will also be suprised as to how many local businesses thrive on sports. As for the owners.... it is there money. They did not become billionaires by giving there money away. They have so many donations charity events throughout the year. Most of them did not become rich because of the athletes or coaching staff. They were rich well before that... as they had to buy the franchise. I doubt you want someone else telling you how to spend your money. You are correct as the fans make this revenue possible, I just feel that there is much more to these negotiations than anyone outside those rooms knows.



Since: May 17, 2008
Posted on: February 22, 2011 2:26 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

The athletes make way more money than anyone in any of the actually important fields that I mentioned earlier with few exceptions. How can this be? It is because the owners have the money to pay those huge salaries and make them look small compared to what they keep for themselves. The owners would not be billionaires without the athletes and coaching staffs and their dedication and work. It is the players that suffer the injuries, not the owners. The players would not be millionares without the fans. Fans support teams and cheer players not owners. Perhaps the extra 1 billion dollars that the owners are so greedy for should be dedicated to medical research and community medical services to improve our society's living standard for its documented citizens. It is time that the masses are heard and corporate American culture heads.      
;

It is not about whose job is more "important", salaries are about revenue generated and risk taken.  Yes teaching is important, as are doctors, nurses, firefighters, etc.  The fact is, however, professional athletes make collectively hundreds of millions of dollars because they help generate billions of dollars in revenue each year not because they are important so you really can't compare athletes salaries (or any other entertainers really) to other professions to determine who is "overpaid" or "underpaid" -- anymore, really, than you can compare say nurses, teachers, police and firefighters to each other to determine who is "more important" and thus determine who should be paid more.

The owners, true, will not get hurt on the field.  It is, however, the owners who have investments of hundreds of millions of dollars in their teams, some maybe close to a billion dollars (Jerry Jones, for example, paid something like $250million to buy the team and $800million of his own money on the new stadium), that is at risk if the league fails.  The players do not have this cost or risk, or the cost of utilities, salaries, payments on loans to build the stadium, etc.  In order to pay the ever escalating player salaries and demanded health care costs etc the owners need ever escalating revenues -- that is not going to happen if the NFL gives away $1billion of revenue off the top--and that is not going to satisfy the players either, they want half of that money right now and 50% of everything that comes after.

You say the "players would not be millionaires without the fans" and that is true.  Equally true is that the players would not be millionaires without the owners willing to pay them millions and millions of dollars.  The owners, well many of them were billionaires BEFORE buying NFL teams, most would be billionaires without their teams -- or maybe just "hundreds of millionaires", either way the players need the NFL much more than the owners.


It is time that the masses are heard and corporate American culture heads

The masses have been "heard".  They were "heard" in the $9billion dollars of revenue the NFL generated last year and the millions of people who attended games, bought jerseys and other merchandise, etc.  The massess have been very clear -- the love the NFL.  I am not sure what the second half of your sentence means.



Since: Feb 9, 2008
Posted on: February 22, 2011 2:09 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

This is actually a sad testimony for several reasons. Professional sports is not a necessity such as food, water, shelter and clothing. It is not nearly as important as transportation, or medical services, or education. Professional sports is not a career/job path providing a multitude of jobs (it is not a major employer). It is similar to the games in the Roman empire as a form of entertainment for the masses and is widely popular. The Romans used it as a way to help keep the masses pacified so that they would not revolt. The masses need something to divert their attention to in order to not focus on their plight. The athletes make way more money than anyone in any of the actually important fields that I mentioned earlier with few exceptions. How can this be? It is because the owners have the money to pay those huge salaries and make them look small compared to what they keep for themselves. The owners would not be billionaires without the athletes and coaching staffs and their dedication and work. It is the players that suffer the injuries, not the owners. The players would not be millionares without the fans. Fans support teams and cheer players not owners. Perhaps the extra 1 billion dollars that the owners are so greedy for should be dedicated to medical research and community medical services to improve our society's living standard for its documented citizens. It is time that the masses are heard and corporate American culture heads.      



Since: Aug 25, 2006
Posted on: February 22, 2011 1:34 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

"That makes for better negotiating for the players and owners, but cloudier reporting for the media and fans. "

Good, you hack's always muck up the waters anyways. Let them negotiate ... at more than an arm's length from the media.



Since: Oct 20, 2006
Posted on: February 22, 2011 1:32 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

It just means a better brand of coffee for the snack tray. Rich owners and rich players arguing about riches. Before anyone says not all players are rich -- Obama begs to differ. Anyone making over $250,000 a year is rich in the USA.

Obama: So let it be written -- so let it be done.




Since: Jan 10, 2011
Posted on: February 22, 2011 12:35 pm
 

Labor negotiations see some changes on Day 5

Surely it's a good sign, and not negative.  If nothing else, it probably allowed the two groups to get some of the smaller issues out of the way.  Having accomplished that, it's time to tackle the most contentious issues.  Hence the owners (their representatives) now join the party.  If things go badly from here, we'll know why -- the owners don't intend to negotiate.


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