Blog Entry

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

Posted on: June 6, 2011 8:40 am
Edited on: June 10, 2011 12:51 pm
 
Posted by Ryan Wilson

Titans cornerback Cortland Finnegan is annually considered one of the league's dirtiest players. In 2010, he was fined $40,000 for various forms of unnecessary roughness, including $25,000 after he and Texans wide receiver Andre Johnson staged an impromptu, mid-game throwdown.

Finnegan seems to do most of his talking -- both within the rules and well outside them -- on the field. So maybe it isn't a surprise that he doesn't think Roger Goodell is well-positioned to make decisions regarding player punishments since the commissioner doesn't regularly settle his disputes by going all Neo on adversaries

Specifically, Finnegan tells The Tennessean's Jim Wyatt that Goodell is “A guy who has never played the game.” He said that Goodell doesn't understand the impact of the latest rules on illegal hits.

“You have milliseconds — not even seconds — and it’s not like you try to do it. It just so happens in that split-second you have a chance to tackle a guy and sometimes it happens to be that way,” Finnegan told Wyatt. “Last year having to dive at guys’ knees because you’re not sure … If they duck, and you’re still helmet-to-helmet with them, then it is your fine, it is a penalty on you.

“It has sort of taken the edge of the players who really like the physical play. But I’m not surprised. It’s crazy.”

The "You've never played the game!" talking point is typically the last refuge of the meathead. But whatever you think of Finnegan's style of play (and I think we can all agree any description will be prefaced with synonyms for "dirty"), he has a point. It's the same point Steelers linebacker James Harrison made recently, although he took it a step further than accusing Goodell of never playing football -- he just called the rule makers "idiots."

This probably won't make Finnegan feel any better, but Goodell doesn't make these decisions alone. NFL VP Ray Anderson and former 49ers defensive back Merton Hanks play some part in all this, as does former NFL coach-turned "appeals officer" Ted Cottrell.

Whoever is contributing their two cents to these conversations, the current players are right to question the NFL's motives as well as the rules' effectiveness. The conspiracy theory regarding the former is that the league is making a PR push to show the game is safer so at some point in the future they can argue for an 18-game season. ("We've addressed concussions, now we can play more games. More fun for everybody!")

As for the latter, here's a question no one is asking: does the NFL have the data to support their claim that all these rule changes will increase player safety? Because arbitrarily meting out punishments doesn't magically mean that offending behaviors disappear. If it did, the United States prison system wouldn't be full of small-time drug dealers incarcerated under the mandatory minimum sentences introduced in the 1980s. The law was intended to curb the drug problem and all it did was clog up cells with mostly non-violent offenders. And illegal drugs are still pervasive in this country.

Put differently: it's important to know what effects -- intended and otherwise -- a policy change will have before you implement it. We're all for player safety, it's just not clear if Goodell knows the best way to achieve it.

via PFT

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Comments

Since: Dec 2, 2011
Posted on: January 8, 2012 2:20 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

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Since: Jul 27, 2010
Posted on: June 7, 2011 2:16 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

CWergs, I dont think I was EVER told to make the tackle with my face going into a ribcage. True I was taught hitting them in the numbers was a good plan, but with a shoulderpad...not a face... Face to sternum is a text book way to break your neck so hold off on that assertion. Also, I don't know what kind of neck set-up you have going on, but last time I check I could tackle around the waist while still looking ahead. I dunno, maybe that's just me



Since: Oct 2, 2006
Posted on: June 6, 2011 8:54 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

EVERYONE and ANYONE that has ever played the game to any degree knows that the fundamentals and LOGIC say the best way to tackle someone is slightly below the waist
Obviously you haven't played the game to any degree then - proper tackling form is head up, see what you're hitting, facemask to rib-cage...    going for someone junk would cause head to go down and you'd be looking at the ground.

Nice try on the post though.

CWergs



Since: Apr 14, 2007
Posted on: June 6, 2011 7:25 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

The "You've never played the game!" talking point is typically the last refuge of the meathead.

Or the person knowledeable of the game, for instance...
This probably won't make Finnegan feel any better, but Goodell doesn't make these decisions alone. NFL VP Ray Anderson and former defensive back Merton Hanks play some part in all this, as does former NFL coach-turned "appeals officer" Ted Cottrell.

Or that each and every owner voted to pass this rule, and without that magority vote it could not have been done.

And then there is this...

Whoever is contributing their two cents to these conversations, the current players are right to question the NFL's motives

You wouldn't know what the players rights are, having never been one.

Or this...

As for the latter, here's a question no one is asking: does the NFL have the data to support their claim that all these rule changes will increase player safety? Because arbitrarily meting out punishments doesn't magically mean that offending behaviors disappear. If it did, the United States prison system wouldn't be full of small-time drug dealers incarcerated under the mandatory minimum sentences introduced in the 1980s. The law was intended to curb the drug problem and all it did was clog up cells with mostly non-violent offenders. And illegal drugs are still pervasive in this country.

Put differently: it's important to know what effects -- intended and otherwise -- a policy change will have before you implement it.

It turns out the meathead is most certainly you Ryan. You can't compile data for something that has never been tried, and that goes beyond football. In addition, had you ever played the game you would know that from pee-wee to the pros coaches teach proper tackling, and dirty players like James Harrison and ignore this to appear better players than they really are.

It's no wonder the dirtiest players from teams known for dirty play, and coaching staffs that encourage it are whining. The real question here is why are you when you never played the game?

Or did you? Where did you play Ryan?



Since: Mar 5, 2009
Posted on: June 6, 2011 6:57 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

Finnegan needs his @$$ kicked again.



Since: Oct 21, 2006
Posted on: June 6, 2011 6:43 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

God Redwings, you either got a heavy check into the board or need to taking an F-ing reading comprehension course. If you really look at what I said you completely agreed with me. But since I don't have time to take you through High School English 1, that onus is upon you. Figure it freaking out and please don't procreate.



Since: Aug 22, 2007
Posted on: June 6, 2011 6:43 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

Lets get things straight here.  As padding has increased, so have the injuries and concussions.  When Finnegan complains about the rules he's stating total BS.  While I agree they have less than a second to make a decision, I find it hard to believe that guys were able to avoid these kind of cheap shots before they had all the equipment on.  No where in any instructional video or any coach you ever talk to will say that the proper way to hit someone is to hit then head on head.  EVERYONE and ANYONE that has ever played the game to any degree knows that the fundamentals and LOGIC say the best way to tackle someone is slightly below the waist.  Too high and you risk getting out muscled, too low you risk the player stepping out of the tackle.  Fundamentals are what Roger G wants to bring back, something that has been thrown in the garbage since guys like Finnegan have decided it's necessary to blow a guy up when he comes thru the middle and is defenseless.  Please Cortland, show me the coach that taught you that this is the proper way to play football.  While it makes for a good WOW moment, it's not fundamentally sound and your argument is ignorant



Since: Sep 20, 2008
Posted on: June 6, 2011 5:50 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

Cortland Finnegan is one of the dirtiest blindside hitting losers in the game today. Of course he is going to bitch and moan about new hitting rules because he is one of the worst offenders in the league. What a piece of trash.



Since: May 16, 2009
Posted on: June 6, 2011 5:29 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

Goodell is going to be dragged through the mud no matter what. If he sat by and did nothing he's be a heartless commissioner who doesn't care about player safety. On the other hand, if he enforces the rules and tries to protect the players from serious injury, he's a hardass who won't let them play football. Either way, he's the scapegoat. Personally, i believe it's about damn time professional sports had a commish who enforced the rules and punished players who acted like punks. They're all filthy rich anyway and all i'm getting from this whole moronic debacle is - which of us gets to be wealthier?



Since: Nov 5, 2007
Posted on: June 6, 2011 5:27 pm
 

Cortland Finnegan latest to question new NFL rule

Finnegan refers to Goodell as a guy who never played the game... couldn't you say the same about a guy who has never run a business?


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