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Report: Michael Vick, Nike strike deal ... again

Posted on: July 1, 2011 12:31 pm
Edited on: July 1, 2011 2:44 pm
 
Posted by Ryan Wilson

Michael Vick's football career is inextricably linked to the dogfighting charges that landed him in prison for 21 months in December 2007. He returned to football with the Eagles in 2009, and last season Vick was again one of the most explosive players in the league, leading Philadelphia to the postseason.

Now the man who was once the most recognizable face in the NFL only to lose it all while serving time has landed an endorsement deal with Nike -- again, CNBC.com's Darren Rovell reports. "CNBC has learned that, in a remarkable move, Nike, which severed Vick’s contract in 2007 after he admitted to his involvement in a dogfighting ring, has re-signed the Philadelphia Eagles quarterback."

Vick's agent Joel Segal told CNBC that “Michael is excited to have a long-term and strong relationship with Nike.” And Nike spokesman Derek Kent said “Michael acknowledges his past mistakes. We do not condone those actions, but we support the positive changes he has made to better himself off the field.”

More background via Rovell:
It is believed to be the first time in the history of sports marketing that a brand that dumped an athlete came back to re-sign him. Coca-Cola let Kobe Bryant’s contract expire in 2003, after he was charged with sexual assault; the criminal case was dropped, and the civil case was settled. Coca-Cola eventually hired Bryant back in 2008 to endorse its Vitamin Water brand. …

After a great season on the field in 2010, corporate America started to give him a chance again. Unequal Technologies, which was making Vick his protective gear to go under his jersey, signed him to a two-year endorsement deal in January. Two months later, Vick signed a deal with Core Synergy, a titanium-infused, silicone wristband brand. At the end of the season, Vick's No. 7 Eagles jersey was the sixth most popular in the league.
Vick has done and said all the right things since returning to football, and more importantly, he's appeared sincere while doing so.

We dug up two of Vick's most popular Nike commercials, before dogfighting temporarily derailed his career and landed him behind bars. It's hard to believe that these spots are from 2006 and 2007.


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Category: NFL
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Since: Oct 7, 2011
Posted on: October 19, 2011 4:00 am
 

Report: Michael Vick, Nike strike deal ... again

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Since: Dec 25, 2006
Posted on: July 5, 2011 6:30 pm
 

Report: Michael Vick, Nike strike deal ... again

NYKLIB ... right on!




Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: July 5, 2011 12:18 am
 

Report: Michael Vick, Nike strike deal ... again

if a regular citizen (not a star pro athlete) was involved in dogfighting and had the same sentence, it would be next to impossible to find work, let alone with the same employer (Vick with the NFL).  A boss/CEO would take one look at his resume or see a background check on him and would learn he was in jail.  Besides in Hollywood and sports, it is next to impossible to return to work or get a job if you have a criminal record.  

Not true at all.  It's an awful crime but too many people believe what you do and it's just not true at all.  Before I give you examples of people I know on both sides of the border with great jobs that not one person did a background or criminal check on let me tell you something.  If a regular person does what Vick did, it doesn't make national headlines.  It doesn't make every website known to man and every newspaper in almost every country imagineable.  It makes a local newspaper or two and it most likely stops right there.  Now to my examples.  I am best friends with a project manager in the automotive industry that makes over 100 thousand dollars per year ( yes, even in this economy) and neither of the 2 companies he's worked for in the last 15 years full time checked anything but personal/work references.  I know an accountant that works for a very large corporation and makes over 150 grand per year running 2 offices and about 40 employees and no, they didn't do a background or criminal record check on him either.  I work as an independant sales contractor. People trust me with their reputation on a daily basis.  I represent my clients on a regular basis, I sell for them and help my clients increase their market share.  I speak on behalf of my clients on a regular basis... I've had many clients over the last 3 years since I went on my own and not one has asked for anything more then a personal or business reference or two....  that's just my 3 example of 3 people from 3 different worlds and none were questioned that way.  Do a lot of companies check? Sure.  But a lot don't....don't get me wrong, I'm sure somebody like Vick would be forced to doctor up a resume to fill in some lost time and lie about their criminal record to get around things but a qualified and experienced person would find a good job.....

And as far as Stallworth, the guy would have been hit by a car, I agree.  But, Stallworth got off way too easy.  Not even a month in jail for a DWI.  That's telling our children that if they grow up to be celebrities or superstar athletes, it does not matter if they drive drunk or sober, they will get off just because they are famous.  I can't believe people are actually defending him.  With all his money (he had just signed a big deal with the Browns), he could have paid for a cab or because he was a celebrity, he may have even gotten a free ride.  He should have known that since he was drunk, he should have not driven.  And Plaxico Burress, who did not kill a soul (dog or human) and shot HIMSELF, got just as harsh, if not a worse punishment than Vick.  As long as he plays, I can never root for a dog murderer

First of all only God knows if the guy WOULD have been hit by a car, nobody on these boards knows for sure he wouldn't have gotten away with it.  The bottom line is the second we start lettting drunk drivers off the hook for somebody that we predict would have been hit by a sober driver it becomes a dark day for our society.  Can't do that... it sets a bad precendent and it just can't happen.   As for Burress, don't feel sorry for him.  He didn't go to jail for shooting himself, he got sentenced for carrying an unlicensed gun into a business he did not own and for the gun going off in a bar full of people.  The laws in the state of New York are very easy to read... do what he did and you get jail time.  There is only one of two sentences he could have recieved, he got the lesser one.  He could have been in jail for 3.5 years had he fought the charges.. the law allowed for the plea bargain and he got a littles less.  A gun in your pocket in a bar is NOT protection... it's stupid.  So what if somebody pulls a gun on him?  Does that mean we should allow a wild wild west gun fight in a local bar?  Just flat out stupid... he had no business carrying a gun.....



Since: Dec 7, 2006
Posted on: July 4, 2011 11:05 pm
 

Report: Michael Vick, Nike strike deal ... again

As a dog owner and lover, there is NO WAY I could ever forgive him for what he did.  Serial killers start off with animals before moving to people.  And before anyone gets on me, I am not saying he will move on to people.  I do think he is a changed man, but if a regular citizen (not a star pro athlete) was involved in dogfighting and had the same sentence, it would be next to impossible to find work, let alone with the same employer (Vick with the NFL).  A boss/CEO would take one look at his resume or see a background check on him and would learn he was in jail.  Besides in Hollywood and sports, it is next to impossible to return to work or get a job if you have a criminal record.  While I believe in second chances, it is sickening what he did to those dogs.  To fight them to the death, profit off of it, and kill them with a gun when they could not fight anymore is so inhuman.  Dogs belong in loving homes, not in the ring fighting each other to the death.

Dolfin, you cannot compare this to the soldiers who died for their country.  The soldiers WANTED to fight for America.  They volunteered and did not profit at all.  Many did not survive and those who did, a lot have physical ailments they will have to live with for the rest of their lives.  They died for their country.  Vick was an arrogant pro athlete who thought he was above the law and thought it was okay to have an outside hobby of fighting dogs and earning money off of it.  Nike is the biggest shoe company in the world and to re-sign him is sending a bad message to our kids.  It says that you can get in trouble with the law and if serve your time, it is okay because we will give you a second chance.  When these children get older and find out what he did, they will want to be like him (remember "Like Mike" campaign from the 90s) as they see him as an influence and will want to be just like him.  They will think if Vick (their role model) did something, they should do it.  And these children, who are now grown, will also end up in jail.  Many of our youth look up to pro athletes and want to do everything just as they would and Nike taking him back sets a bad example on our youth.

And as far as Stallworth, the guy would have been hit by a car, I agree.  But, Stallworth got off way too easy.  Not even a month in jail for a DWI.  That's telling our children that if they grow up to be celebrities or superstar athletes, it does not matter if they drive drunk or sober, they will get off just because they are famous.  I can't believe people are actually defending him.  With all his money (he had just signed a big deal with the Browns), he could have paid for a cab or because he was a celebrity, he may have even gotten a free ride.  He should have known that since he was drunk, he should have not driven.  And Plaxico Burress, who did not kill a soul (dog or human) and shot HIMSELF, got just as harsh, if not a worse punishment than Vick.  As long as he plays, I can never root for a dog murderer.



Since: Dec 25, 2006
Posted on: July 4, 2011 3:51 pm
 

Report: Michael Vick, Nike strike deal ... again

Either way, what point are you trying to argue?
I'm not trying to argue anything. I simply stated that regardless if he was stone cold sober or blitzed out of his mind, the guy ran in front of his car. I guess I was just bringing up the question, since he blew over the limit, was he automatically at fault?

On the one hand you tell us Big Ben didn't do anything wrong because he wasn't charged and convicted of anything but in the same breath you tell us Stallworth isn't a bad guy because a guy was jay-walking even though Stallworth was CONVICTED of a crime....  can't win with you man.  When a guy isn't convicted you defend him but when he is you make excuses for him..... you have to choose one or the other.  You can't have it both ways..... either a conviction means something or it doesn't.  
With all due respect, you have me confused with somebody else. I never mentioned Ben in any of my prior posts.


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