Blog Entry

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

Posted on: August 17, 2011 11:17 pm
Edited on: August 18, 2011 5:24 am
 
Posted by Will Brinson

An interview with Michael Vick in GQ is set to hit the Internet on Thursday morning, and you can guarantee that after reading some of the quotes, it's sure to cause a bit of a publicity firestorm.

Well, that's based on some limited quotes, via Deadspin, that Vick gave to Will Leitch (of New York mag and Deadspin fame) anyway.

"Yeah, you got the family dog and the white picket fence, and you just think that's all there is," Vick said about the background involved in people hearing his story. "Some of us had to grow up in poverty-stricken urban neighborhoods, and we just had to adapt to our environment. I know that it's wrong. But people act like it's some crazy thing they never heard of. They don't know."

This is true, I think. I've argued as much, but whenever you play the "byproduct of culture or society" angle to anyone, they immediately put any number of examples that refute that back in your face. That's cool. It's their prerogative, and it's why there's not a singular opinion about Vick in our society.

Whatever you think about that subject, though, it probably is going to involve some discussion of race. Vick, based on his quotes, is fine with obliging that line of thinking.

Eagles Offseason

"I think that's accurate," Vick tells Leitch when asked if white people don't get how dogfighting plays out in black culture. "I mean, I was just one of the ones who got exposed, and because of the position I was in, where I was in my life, it went mainstream. A lot of people got out of it after my situation, not because I went to prison but because it was sad for them to see me go through something that was so pointless, that could have been avoided."

Hoo boy. Not to make comparisons with football players who have been to prison and then returned to the game, but these sort of quotes kind of sound awfully familiar, yes?

Look, we don't yet know the context of the full discussion between Leitch and Vick. But it's pretty hard to fathom that such quotes are taken out of context to the point that they seem somewhat inflammatory here but not within the scope of the full interview.

What's even harder to fathom is that Vick would actually break character and say anything remotely controversial. To this point, he's been picture perfect when it comes to rehabilitating his image. The comments above are the antithesis of that.

A.J. Daulerio at Deadspin makes a good point though -- from a sports perspective, the most controversial comments that Vick makes might have to do with his decision about where to stage his comeback.

Originally, Vick didn't want to go to Philadelphia. He felt like joining the Bills or Bengals (!) were better options.

"I think I can say this now, because it's not going to hurt anybody's feelings, and it's the truth... I didn't want to come to Philadelphia," Vick says. "Being the third-team quarterback is nothing to smile about. Cincinnati and Buffalo were better options."

Leitch then points out that Vick met with Roger Goodell and the NFL and was steered towards Philly -- "I commend and thank them, because they put me in the right situation" -- which could seriously fire up those two fanbases, given that having Michael Vick on their respective rosters would certainly change things.

Oh, and the fact that the league steered one of the (now) most dynamic players in the league to a particular situation. That should go over really well with the media in the coming days.

Despite the potential firestorm that could come on that front, though, it's hard to really fault anyone for pushing Vick a certain way -- no one thought he would end up playing as well as he did in 2010.

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Comments

Since: Aug 18, 2011
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:46 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

"I think that's accurate," Vick tells Leitch when asked if white people don't get how dogfighting plays out in black culture. "I mean, I was just one of the ones who got exposed, and because of the position I was in, where I was in my life, it went mainstream. A lot of people got out of it after my situation, not because I went to prison but because it was sad for them to see me go through something that was so pointless, that could have been avoided.....



SO WHITE PEOPLE DONT KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT BEING POOR AND DOG FIGHTING. GOD WHEN ARE BLACK PEOPLE GOING TO GET OVER THE WHITE / BLACK BARRIER. EVERYTHING THAT GOES ON , HAS BEEN DONE BY A BLACK OR WHITE PERSON. AND FACT IS MR VICK GOT EXPOSED MORE BECAUSE HE IS A PROFESSIONAL . I BELIEVE IF ANYONE IS CAUGHT DOING SOMETHING LIKE DOG FIGHTING SHOULD BE PUT ON TV . HE DID HIS TIME. AND IT IS TRUE IT COULD OF BEEN AVOIDED BUT IT WASNT POINTLESS.. YOU USED DOG FIGHTING AS SPORT FOR YOU , GOD GIVE ME SOME OF THE MONEY YOU WASTED ON KILLING INNOCENT DOGS SO I CAN HELP HOMELESS PEOPLE . SOMETIMES PEOPLE ARE IDIOTS



Since: Aug 6, 2011
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:42 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

Dog fighting, cock fighting, kitten fighting or gerbel fighting should not be acceptted, because "it's how we were brought up". Abusing innocents is not a way out ever.



Since: Nov 15, 2008
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:24 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

After reading the first quote, I think he was trying to point out how prevelant dog fighting is in poverty stricken areas, and how easily it can be prevented.  That's what he's saying.  He isn't going to play the "victim of society" card... especially after he's worked so hard to build up his image.  



Since: Nov 3, 2006
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:24 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

Hey ChitownJones, nobody ever said that dogs were people.  Had he tortured people in the manner that he did these animals he would have stayed in jail the rest of his life and probably gotten the death sentence.



Since: Jun 5, 2011
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:16 am
 

The MSM specializes in controversy

Vick probably answered a bunch of questions honestly, and was probably asked to explain himself.  The media and the general public are great at making accusations and calling explainations "excuses."  I'm sure that is what will happen here.  If Vick says "I'm sorry" 100,000 times and says "it was part of my culture when I was a kid" once, the headlines will say something like "Vick the Unrepentant Dog-Killer..."
 
Such is the media, and such are the public in their thirst for knocking those who make it down, especially if they have "too much" pigment in their skin.  If a white QB had done this, he would already have been forgiven and his numerous apologies would have been taken at face value.  Vick, like Tiger Woods, will suffer the maximum amount of bile the public can throw at him for as long as they can sling it.



Since: Apr 4, 2010
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:06 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial


This purpa drankin slum lord will be eaten alive by a pack of ravaging Pitbulls and Beagles when he reaches the doors to hell!

 Or, maybe not. 




Since: Jan 17, 2010
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:03 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

Funny how people cry like babbies when the NFL tries to make their game less violent and more humane for the players. But since violent football is the culture we all grew up with we can't give it up. Sounds familiar huh?



Since: Dec 9, 2008
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:03 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

Why couldn't they wait til the full article came out? Now people are being ridiculous and didn't even know what he said completely. Let the article come out then comment on his quotes.



Since: Nov 6, 2010
Posted on: August 18, 2011 1:01 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

Mike did his time, paid for his crime and now is back in the NFL making bank again.  I would only say that the best policy in the media is to kill em with kindness and not allow any of your comments to be misconstrued.  Mike's mantra should be that he has put that part of his life behind him and is moving forward.  In these interviews the media is looking for anything to start up a firestorm.  Be smart Mike.  AVOID IT.



Since: Nov 8, 2010
Posted on: August 18, 2011 12:46 am
 

Michael Vick GQ interview will be controversial

I just don't see "controversy" in Vick's comments,
Of course the socialization process, based on socio-economic status and geographical factors  
played a part in Michael Vick's poor decisions, and ultimately, led to his prison stay.  
And, yes, in America,we DO house a disproportionate number of young Blacks, (deservedly or not).
And of course it could have happened differently, as is the great fortune of a percentage of those
who traveled a similar path, but made good instead of bad.   And, yeah... the "cultural divide" can't
be denied, either.  Anyone who says that where they're from, what their parents were like,  which
side of the tracks they grew up on, and quite possibly the color of their skin isn't a predictor of future
behavior and sucess, or lack thereof, are denying factual evidence to the contrary.  
Mike Vick has accepted responsibility, done his time and moved on.  It's society, the fans and the media
that cotinue to make Vick into an NFL side show. Seems to me, the NFL has made out
like bandits by "branding" Vick as Bad Boy Makes Good. To keep that cash cow flowing takes the
Media selling it to the fans, and the Mike Vick circle-jerk is complete.   


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