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Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

Posted on: August 19, 2011 1:44 pm
Edited on: August 19, 2011 4:47 pm
 
Posted by Ryan Wilson

On Thursday, the league declared former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor eligible for the supplemental draft, but with the caveat that he must serve a five-game suspension should he sign with an NFL team. Pryor's agent, Drew Rosenhaus, originally backed the decision imposed by commissioner Roger Goodell.

On Friday, Pryor's lawyer, David Cornwell, appearing on ESPN Radio's Mike & Mike, sounded like someone who had plans to -- you guessed it -- appeal Goodell's decision.

“[Goodell] indicated that we have the right to appeal within three days after Terrelle signs an NFL contract, and given some of the developments both in reaching the decision and comments out of the [NFL Players Association] regarding the decision, I think it’s likely that we will file an appeal, and give the Players Association an opportunity to make it’s objections to this on the record,” Cornwell said, according wire reports

This assumes, of course, that Pryor will be drafted on August 22. Surely, someone in Pryor's camp must have those assurances because the timing of Cornwall's announcement could scare off potential suitors (and who knows, it still might).

The bigger issue is (and we seem to be saying this all the time) Goodell's role in all this. As CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman wrote Thursday, the league would like to discipline NFL players who run afoul of NCAA rules, and the decision to suspend Pryor for five games was Goodell's way of circumventing the current guidelines that prevent that.

"What Roger Goodell did in suspending Pryor is get the NCAA's back. The NFL and NCAA both feel that players are breaking rules on the college level thinking they can use the NFL as an escape hatch. The NFL wants to stop that mentality. What Goodell did was also send a message to the union. If you won't work with us on this, then I'll use the commissioner power to make the decisions myself."

PFT's Mike Florio echoes many of the sentiments Freeman laid out: "If the NFLPA lets this one slide, then the NFL will try in the future to take similar action when a former college player who has gotten himself in trouble with the NCAA wants to play pro football."

Not surprisingly, the players are concerned, too. "I know players are concerned about the message this sends," said Browns linebacker Scott Fujita, a member of the players' executive committee. "Granted, making this 'deal' was an individual decision made by a player with counsel from his agent and lawyer. They have every right to make whatever deal they want for his personal future. That being said, the general concern now is how far into Pandora's box this may go."

And that's the problem.

Next up: seeing which teams are impressed enough with Pryor's workout to draft him. The Cleveland Plain Dealer's Mary Kay Cabot writes that the Browns will be on hand for Pryor's Saturday pro day. Also worth mentioning: in June, the Browns were already doing their due dliigence on Pryor. We think it's safe to say that they like him. Just at what cost?

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Comments

Since: Jan 12, 2008
Posted on: August 20, 2011 12:06 pm
 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

Shame on you racist caucasions.
 
LOL...What are caucasions?

Learn to spell, jackass!



Since: Jul 31, 2011
Posted on: August 20, 2011 11:49 am
 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

People are going to be racists no matter who the president is so that is really irrelevant. However, these two yuong men, one who served jail time for fighting dogs and the other who helped get his coach fired, knowingly broke tons of NCAA rules and made a mockery of the system. I think that is good enough reason to want these guys to fail.



Since: Aug 24, 2006
Posted on: August 20, 2011 11:17 am
 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

Everyone keeps saying that this is Goodell making a power play by either showing his backing of the NCAA or that he can make his own rules for suspending and punishing players in the NFL.  To some degree I can see that, but as soon as I heard the report I thought of it a different way.

Look at it from Pryor's side, the league wasn't going to let him be in the supplemental draft because he didn't fit their rules for being eligible.  What if he is the one that offered up the 5 game suspension as a bribe so to speak to let him in.  Say "since I wouldn't have been able to play the first 5 games in college I'll take the same time off in the pros and start my season at the same point."

I don't see how this sets any precedent for Goodell.  What other player is going to get in trouble in college and not leave until the supplemental draft rather than the full draft?  Had Pryor waited until next year there would have been no suspension at all.



Since: Jul 24, 2011
Posted on: August 20, 2011 11:14 am
 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

suspending sumbdy n da nfl fo sumthin dat dey did n college seems preety dum nd did goodell 4 gt da only reason y pryor cam @ da nfl was because he wantd @ 4gt bou da suspension n college so he could gt a freshstart  n da nfl.


your in eight
Since: Aug 20, 2011
Posted on: August 20, 2011 11:05 am
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Dec 8, 2008
Posted on: August 20, 2011 10:51 am
 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

My opinion wasn't a legal analysis, it was more of a commentary on Mr. Goodell's actions, admittedly carried over from his punitive actions last year.  I agree with everything you say in your post.  The practical problem I see, though, is while I completely agree with you in that the NFL treats the NCAA as a farm system, the fact is that it isn't a farm system; if it were, the players would be paid.  Notwithstanding that, I'm not neccesarily against the concept of punishing athletes such as this when and if they make it to the NFL.  However, I think the punishment should be consistent with current NFL punishiments; a current player would need to violate the banned substance policy to get a punishment as harsh as Pryor received: in this case, 5/16ths of his salary.  Don't get me wrong, the guy is still going to make a ton of money and I'm not losing any tears for him, but the punishment is simply inconsistent with the NFL's policy.  That's the reason why I feel Mr. Goodell is acting with the wrong motive.

I agree that there is an inherent problem with the NCAA's system of the punishment of deeds done by others falls on those who remain behind.  I'm not sure how that can be resolved.  As you say, simplyfying the rule book would absolutely be a great start. I also agree that clearly defining penalties for infractions would be a tremendous step in the right direction, and I doubt it would that difficult to create. 


Ocadventurer
Since: Apr 22, 2010
Posted on: August 20, 2011 10:38 am
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Nov 23, 2008
Posted on: August 20, 2011 10:34 am
 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

Why do all the same racist haters that want Michael Vick to fail want Terrelle Pryor to fail?

 


I don't want VIck and Pryor to fail because I am racist.. I want Pryor to pay the price for trying to buck the system meant to keep his character issues in check..

I want Vick to fail because I love my dogs....    Do you think I'd be calling you a racist if you wanted Casey Anthony to drink a fifth of vodka and dare her to drive?? Nope.   I don't by the "it was how we grew up crap"   He grew up with a full ride to college, a massive pro contract, and undoubtedly all the promotion and support he wanted in school. Plenty of people grew up poor and impovershed. hell I lived in a mobile home with a big hole in front of the stove.. Doesn't mean it's an excuse for me to grow up, get rich, and get popped manufacturing meth... 


Ocadventurer
Since: Apr 22, 2010
Posted on: August 20, 2011 10:30 am
This comment has been removed.

Post Deleted by Administrator




Since: Nov 23, 2008
Posted on: August 20, 2011 10:28 am
 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

 

Pryor's lawyer plans to appeal 5-game suspension

I could be wrong here but it seems the league (Goodell) wants to discipline DRAFTEES..incoming players from college...NOT current players.  Why would anybody see a problem with the NFL sending a message to the NCAA footballers that they are being watched and better not "run afoul" in college? Seems like a win win to me.

This is a question of character. Terelle Pryor only became "ineligible" to play in college sometime after he decided he was going to skip the next year because of his suspension and other things with "The Ohio State" football team. So my guess is that he was in pro money mode drinking the 1st round Kool Aid Rosenhaus was pushing to him and school was no longer a priority.. Personally if he had a free ride to an education and couldn't provide enough self motivation to pursue it.. but rather made the "assumption" that he could go pro through the supplenmental draft that's his bad.. 

BOTTOM LINE- He broke the rules and thought he was too smart to serve the suspension.. In the end he got got...   I agree with the decision- The NCAA is the premier breeding ground for NFL Talent... these prospects should know that their character is watched. This wasn't because Terelle was selling memorbilia, it was because he tried to beat the system... lucky he was allowed into the supplemental draft at all.. 


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com