Blog Entry

NFL fines Dunta Robinson $40K for Maclin hit

Posted on: September 19, 2011 6:03 pm
Edited on: September 20, 2011 10:01 am
 
Posted by Will Brinson

On Sunday night, Falcons cornerback Dunta Robinson repeated history by smashing Eagles wide receiver Jeremy Maclin with a helmet-to-helmet hit that reminded everyone of a similar shot he dropped on Eagles wideout DeSean Jackson in 2010.

Robinson was fined $40,000 by the NFL on Monday for violation of Rule 12, Section 2, Article 9 (a) (2) of the NFL's official playing rules (you probably know it as the "defenseless receiver rule").

"It is a foul if a player initiates unnecessary contact against a player who is in a defenseless posture," the rule reads.

He was also alerted by NFL VP of Football Operations Merton Hanks that any future violations of player safety rules would result in a suspension.

"Future offenses will result in an escalation of fines up to and including suspension," Hanks wrote to Robinson in a letter.  Roger Goodell was informed of the decision, and said "we felt this was the appropriate discipline."

The $40,000 is the minimum fine available to repeat offenders -- Robinson classifies, per the NFL, because of his hit on Jackson in 2010. At that time, Robinson was fined $50,000, but that fine was later reduced to $25,000.

"Robinson hit was violation because Maclin was defenseless by rule-had 'not had time to protect himself or has not clearly become a runner,'" NFL VP of Communications Greg Aiello tweeted Monday.

Our own Pete Prisco, who was on the scene for the Falcons-Eagles tilt -- notes that the "Falcons didn't feel it was cheap." Atlanta head coach Mike Smith said following Sunday night's game that he believed the hit was legal and "that's the way we teach it."
NFL Week 2

"My opinion didn't change," Smith reiterated Monday.

If Robinson does appeal, his case will be heard by ex-NFL coaches Art Shell and Ted Cottrell and must be heard by the second Tuesday.

I wrote this morning that Robinson should be suspended by the NFL, and I still feel that way. He flagrantly went head-hunting on Maclin, and both players are lucky that the Eagles wideout didn't sustain a serious injury.

"Player safety is a priority and we will not relent on it," NFL VP of Football Operations Ray Anderson said over the summer. "Let me make it very clear, particularly in regard to repeat offenders, that egregious acts will be subject to suspension. We will not feel the need to hesitate in this regard."

Had the hit on Maclin resulted in the wideout being carted off the field (a la Austin Collie), would Robinson have been suspended? My guess -- which is, admittedly, a morbid hypothetical -- is that Robinson wouldn't be suiting up for the Falcons next game.

And that's a scary thought because it means the league remains reactive -- rather than proactive -- when it comes to player safety.

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Comments
1977 yankees
Since: Sep 18, 2011
Posted on: September 20, 2011 3:26 pm
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Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: September 20, 2011 3:16 pm
 

NFL fines Dunta Robinson $40K for Maclin hit

How does Robinson get fined LESS for a repeat offense when he was fined more the 1st time last year? The NFL discipline is a joke. They wanna suspend Pryor games for what he did in college, which is fine, but will not suspend Robinson for even one game for trying to injure another player. Until the start either suspending guys for this nonsense, or pulling game checks, it will never end. They reduced his fine last year from 50K to 25K. Will they drop it this year to 20K? But they'll move the kick-off line to the 40 to prevent injuries??? Guys are still bringing the ball out from the back of the endzone and they still need to block until the return man takes a knee. Does anyone in that office have a brain? I don't think so.

There are things Goodell has access to that you and I don't.  What I'm saying is there are rules in place and parameters in place for these types of things, he can't just do whatever he wants like you people think he can.   It's extremely difficult to fine guys much more then 40 or 50 thousand dollars.  Why? Because the NFL has plenty of players making 4 or 500 thousand dollars.  If you fine Robinson 100 K for a second offence then you have to fine the guy that makes minimum wage 100 K as well that could amount to working 2 or 3 NFL games for free.  Yet a player that just signed a 50 million dollar deal isn't even affected by fines.....  

The answer to stopping this is suspensions, but there is a problem with that as well.  The NFL didn't get so popular and profitable because people like watching backups play football, it's where it is because people like watching starters play in the NFL.  What I'm saying is 90 percent of the time these dirty hits we see are not by chumps nobody cares about, they are for the most part anywhere from very good players to superstars in the NFL.

If you suspend Robinson then you have to suspend EVERYBODY that matches what he did now or down the road.   Imagine a team loses its star player for the last 3 games of the season because of a suspension and his team doesn't make the playoffs because of a couple bad hits?   If the league goes the suspension route, there is no turning back and there is no way they can make exceptions later on.

That's why in my opinion it's easier to keep doing what the league has been doing.  Instruct the refs to throw more flags and 15 yard penalties with those flags.... fine people various amounts and call it a day.

It's easier that way.... 



Since: Jan 20, 2010
Posted on: September 20, 2011 3:05 pm
 

NFL fines Dunta Robinson $40K for Maclin hit

This hit was awful gamesmanship.  If the Falcons' coaching staff is teaching players to hit like this, then they should be fined as well.  The DeSean Jackson hit wasn't as bad as this one.  He lowered the crown of his helmet and went after the receiver's head.  I'm not sure how there wasn't a flag thrown immediately, considering how many totally legal hits we've already seen wrongly flagged for unnecessary roughness this season. 



Since: May 31, 2009
Posted on: September 20, 2011 3:03 pm
 

NFL fines Dunta Robinson $40K for Maclin hit

"It is a foul if a player initiates unnecessary contact against a player who is in a defenseless posture,"


This is the perfect loophole for the Panthers to become super bowl champions. All Rivera needs to do is hire a blind running back who can take direct snaps from under center. Once he has the ball, he can't legally be tackled hit the entire game.

BOO-YAH!




Since: May 25, 2011
Posted on: September 20, 2011 3:01 pm
 

NFL fines Dunta Robinson $40K for Maclin hit

Skanks 1977

Go have another drink jackass



Since: May 25, 2011
Posted on: September 20, 2011 2:59 pm
 

NFL fines Dunta Robinson $40K for Maclin hit

Go have another drink jackass



Since: Aug 31, 2011
Posted on: September 20, 2011 2:58 pm
 

NFL fines Dunta Robinson $40K for Maclin hit

The fact that he did or did not stay in the game does not change my opinion of whether a hit is legal or not.  I think this was a dirty play by a player that has not got the message on new rules and should have to sit out a game.  These guys are in a business (contact sport as it may be) and you can't have people going out there and doing things that risk ending a career.  Until the league steps up the fines/suspensions these kind of hits will happen once every week or two.  They need to come down harder on them and cut it out before someone gets seriously hurt or killed by a head/neck injury.



1977 yankees
Since: Sep 18, 2011
Posted on: September 20, 2011 1:58 pm
This comment has been removed.

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1977 yankees
Since: Sep 18, 2011
Posted on: September 20, 2011 1:53 pm
This comment has been removed.

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1977 yankees
Since: Sep 18, 2011
Posted on: September 20, 2011 1:42 pm
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Post Deleted by Administrator



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