Blog Entry

Teammate thinks Jackson is '[messing] around'

Posted on: December 2, 2011 9:20 am
Edited on: December 2, 2011 12:27 pm
 
Jackson isn't interested in talking to reporters about the current state of his game. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

The big story this morning isn't that that Marshawn Lynch has come out of nowhere to be one of the league's best running backs this season. Or that "the plan" Pete Carroll referred during training camp really does include Tarvaris Jackson, who has played well in recent weeks.

DeSean's forgettable season
Instead, as is often the case anytime the Eagles play, the big story is DeSean Jackson, the mercurial wide receiver in the last year of this rookie contract who plays with all the urgency of a shorts and t-shirt minicamp workout. Following Philly's latest loss, a 31-14 effort against the Seahawks on Thursday night, Jackson admitted that he's "frustrated with losing," but when one of his teammates was asked if Jackson was completely in the game he said, "No, he's [messing] around." 

If the plan is to sleepwalk through the current season for his current team and alienate the 31 others that might've had interested during free agency then mission accomplished, DeSean.  Otherwise, we have no idea what Jackson's doing and his "plan," unlike Pete Carroll's, is not only ill-conceived but it's going to cost him a lot of money.

Against the Seahawks, Jackson finished the game with four catches for 34 yards. Alone those numbers don't mean much. Without watching you might think that the Seahawks double-teamed Jackson, or that maybe the game plan was to feature LeSean McCoy. And at times, both were true. But Jackson's performance is mostly about his apparent unwillingness to … well, try.

"Actually there were quite a few plays called for him," head coach Andy Reid said. "They were making an effort to double him and move a safety in."

CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman wrote Friday morning about Jackson staring into oblivion while quarterback Vince Young tried to talk to him on the sidelines.

"If that's what they saw, that's what they saw," Jackson said of the cameras, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. "I don't have to sit here and answer them questions. My teammates know what it is."

And during pregame warm-ups, Jackson was hanging out with the defensive ends as the other wide receivers worked together.

"I'm not answering none of that type of question," said Jackson. "If you're going to ask something about the game, do that. . . . Next question."

Two weeks ago, Jackson told NFL Network's Michael Irvin that he's in the Larry Fitzgerald-Calvin Johnson range when it comes to his worth. Fitz makes $15 million this season, Megatron almost $9 million.

"I think right in that range," he said at the time. "Maybe top-5 in the NFL. ...My playmaking skills and abilities, my punt returns, and the ability to get the ball and score on any play. I mean, Fitzgerald, he's a special receiver -- don't get me wrong -- but he doesn't play special teams so that adds an extra edge to it."

In theory, yes. In practice, Fitzgerald has been just as dangerous on special teams this season as Jackson. And much more consistent at wide receiver, and that's with John Skelton throwing him passes.

NFL Network's Marshall Faulk got it right two weeks ago: "Showing up to any meeting late is definitely not a good way to handle (things) when you want money from a team."

Not showing up at all is even worse.

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Comments

Since: Nov 10, 2007
Posted on: December 2, 2011 10:18 am
 

Teammate thinks Jackson is '[messing] around'

Jackson appears to be quickly becoming the new Randy Moss.  Perhaps he should give Randy a call and ask where that road leads.  Maybe he'e smart enough to figure it out, but I doubt it.  So much for the 'dream team'.  Some need to realize that winning in football requires team work, not individual egos who say much and accomplish little.


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com