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Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

Posted on: May 11, 2011 1:46 pm
Edited on: May 11, 2011 2:08 pm
 
The NBA has reportedly proposed a "franchise tag" to the National Basketball Players Association. Posted by Ben Golliver.

Player movement is one of the key issues facing the NBA as it negotiates its next Collective Bargaining Agreement with the National Basketball Players Association. The NBA is a copycat league, and with each playoff series victory that the Miami Heat accumulates, the likelihood that other star players will team up to pick a destination spot in free agency increases.

SI.com reports that the NBA has proposed a "franchise tag", a designation that would potentially increase the incentive for star players to remain with their current team rather than bolt in free agency.
A team would be allowed to designate one player for preferential contractual treatment, including more overall money, more guaranteed money and at least one extra year on his contract. A player would have to agree to such a designation. It is designed to work as an incentive to get a player to remain with his team rather than as a roadblock to free agency, the sources said. 

...

The idea behind the league’s new proposal would be to increase the gap between what teams can offer a “designated player” and what non-designated players can get on the open market.
The National Football League's franchise tag essentially delays free agency by granting the team the ability to lock a player into an extra year. The NBA's version, as described in the report, would work more like a negotiating tie-breaker than as a method of restriction. 

Teaming up isn't a new phenomenon and it's one the league has worked to control for decades. Under the current Collective Bargaining Agreement, star players like LeBron James, Chris Bosh, Carmelo Anthony and Dwight Howard had an extra financial incentive to remain with their current team. In the case of James and Bosh last summer, though, that incentive wasn't enough to keep them from bolting to the Heat. Strengthening those incentives makes sense.

If a star player like, say, Joe Johnson hit free agency under this system, the Atlanta Hawks would be able to go financially above and beyond any other offers to retain him. After testing the waters last summer, Johnson re-signed with the Hawks in part because they were able to make him the largest contract offer. This franchise tag, as outlined, would have further strengthened Atlanta's position by increasing the distance between their maximum offer and the offers his other suitors were able to make. Bolting, therefore, would come at an additional financial cost to him.

Money is a powerful motivator. It's already the single biggest reason why many players choose to stay put rather than team up. Providing an additional incentive in this manner would marginally decrease player movement and provide an added protection to the teams, especially to those located in smaller markets. 

As described, there's no reason for the players to balk at this proposal because it would only affect the most highly-coveted players and it would incentivize their loyalty rather than limit their options.  The vast majority of teams should welcome this development. At first glance, this looks like a win-win.
Comments

Since: Apr 28, 2011
Posted on: May 12, 2011 4:02 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I agree, the NBA should use the NFL's franchise tag.



Since: Dec 15, 2006
Posted on: May 11, 2011 10:41 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I have been a sports fan for 50 years and contracts should all be guaranteed with insentives.  Now if the player does better than the previous year he gets more money or extended contract, now if he does worse and doesn't fullfill his end of the contract he gives back either money or years or even both.  Now about the franchise tag.  That is going to only help the small market teams try to keep up with the bigger markets and not loose their better players.  I say each team can franchise 2 players but there is a tag on what amount the 2 players can add up to.  Now I would also like to suggest something new.  With the second franchise tag being put in and all this taken place  before free agents are picked up by other clubs I would submit that each team in a rotation system (such as the draft) where the teams that had the worst record the previous year can pick a player not protected by the franchise tags or not being a free agent that year and that keeps them under the salary cap, can choose from any other team a player.  Once a team looses a player that team team can pull back all his remaining players except his draft choices of that year.  Every team gets a chance to get someone from another team.  If a team doesn't pick someone they can if they so call desire take that pick the following year but this can't be done in back to back years.   What do you think about this method.  Then free agency starts up.  Free agency stats up at year 4.  Year 2-4 free agents are restricted with a team loosing a year 2-4 free agent the team taking the so called player give up their #1 pick in the draft the following year. Years afterwards such as 5-whatever would become unresticted free agents free. 



Since: Dec 27, 2006
Posted on: May 11, 2011 7:06 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

If you are going to have contracts they should be enforced on both ends (or have player and/or club options attached if both sides mutually agree as in baseball). Otherwise, contracts are worthless. The NFL should change their rules so contracts become guaranteed and the NBA should not do away with guaranteed contracts. 
Absolutely agree 100%...Why the players accept non-guarateed "contracts" (what is a non-guaranteed contract anyway?) is beyond me



Since: Sep 4, 2010
Posted on: May 11, 2011 7:06 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I hate this proposal, if you are going to use the so called "Franchise Tag"  they should adapt the same franchise tag as the NFL, it is the only way the small market teams are ever going to hold onto their superstar players.  

Or the NBA will have to go to contraction and we can go back to the best era in basketball the early 80s-late 90s.



Since: Nov 2, 2006
Posted on: May 11, 2011 6:25 pm
 

Contracts Should Be Entirely Guaranteed

It's called a contract.

In the NFL, the team can cut a player after every season and not have to pay the remainder of the contract if the player fails to perform. But if the player outperforms the contract, they can't renegotiate. It happened in Philly with TO. TO had a great season and wanted to renegotiate but the Eagles didn't have to and didn't. In other words, it gives the team/owner more rights than the player. An owner can sign a player for a ridiculously long contract and backload it so most of the money is at the end and then cut the player before those salaries kick in (unless the player really is worth that money).

If a player and a team sign a five year contract, BOTH the player and the owner should be committed to five years. It shouldn't be the owner has the rights for five years but the player only gets the signing bonus and the first year unless he performs. I have no problem with players being required to perform and lose their jobs if they don't but players should also have the right to move to a better situation as well if they outperform their contract. Most of us don't have contracts. We can be fired whenever we want but we can also leave for a better job whenever we want as well. Shouldn't NFL (and NBA) players have the same rights? If as an NFL owner you don't want to commit to a player for five years, don't sign a five year contract. Sign a shorter contract but prepare to pay more in the next contract or risk losing the player. Owners should not be able to say "we own you as long as we want but we can get rid of you whenever we want".

If you are going to have contracts they should be enforced on both ends (or have player and/or club options attached if both sides mutually agree as in baseball). Otherwise, contracts are worthless. The NFL should change their rules so contracts become guaranteed and the NBA should not do away with guaranteed contracts. 




Since: Mar 2, 2008
Posted on: May 11, 2011 4:52 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

This could all be solved without salary maximums existing from the start.  Yeah, those NBA guyses really are incentived to stay when you can always find the same exact money elsewhere.  Good joke NBA. 

It is also so nice knowing Lebron and Bosh were forced to lowly slave salaries instead of true max contracts.  Stupidest idea is the whole experience cap business, you don't even earn true max money if you are a true superstar in this league.  Waiting seven years in the NBA just to get the max salary, and you are the leagues highly promoted superstar is quite idiotic.  That is very dumb indeed, know wonder poorer talents get the better salaries from desperate team at the end of the day.  Can't even pay players what they deserve earlier.

Superstars take years to get the superstar money they deserved years earlier with this league, and the NBA loves using their image left and right with no regard despite clearly snubbing them of the respect.  Pay them the max alot sooner, waiting seven years is a joke.  Even the NHL figured that part out.  The NHL!!!




Since: May 11, 2011
Posted on: May 11, 2011 4:25 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

This proposal is an attack on free agency and players' ability to self determine who their teammates will be and the city they will be living in or at least spending a large amount of their time. The owners will use any excuse to infringe on full player rights during free agency. This is a power move by the owners and it's all about control. If only one team can offer you more money, then it's not really FREE agency. This proposal by the owners is nothing but a roll back of rights that the players have already won through collective bargaining. NBA players should be striving for even better working conditions and increasing their freedom to choose the course of their proffesional careers and personal lives rather than the other way around.


"As described, there's no reason for the players to balk at this proposal because it would only affect the most highly-coveted players and it would incentivize their loyalty rather than limit their options.  The vast majority of teams should welcome this development. At first glance, this looks like a win-win." -Ben Golliver

Really, Mr. Golliver, you can't think of any reason for the players to balk at this proposal? If your current employer proposed to you an agreement that stipulated that no other potential employer could ever offer you more money than them, you wouldn't balk at that? I guess we shouldn't be surprised considering you were unable to list even ONE benefit to the NBA players should they agree to this, even disregarding the fact that the owners' current CBA proposal would also cut players salaries, gauranteed contracts, and players' share of the revenue.  And when you say that the "vast majority of the teams should welcome this development", you must be using the word 'team' as a euphamism for 'owner' and not 'players'. Of course the owners should welcome it, it was their idea, it benefits them.




Since: May 12, 2010
Posted on: May 11, 2011 4:10 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I'm starting to believe that the league is wasting its time trying to incentivize player loyalty.  Not only have players teamed up for decades, as Golliver pointed out, and not only have Bird rights failed to work in some teams' favor (like Cleveland's), but players continue to demonstrate that they will play for less-than-market value to go where they want.  The minimum salary contracts that Karl Malone and Gary Payton signed with the Lakers several years ago are the most obvious examples, but as further proof: LeBron James, Chris Bosh, and Dwyane Wade are all playing at salaries below the player maximum.  Bosh may not be worth a maximum-salary deal, but the other two certainly are, and in an unrestricted market James and Wade would probably be making well above max money.  They demonstrated that they were more than willing to earn below market value to play on the same team.  How is the league going to prevent players from playing at a discount?

I'm skeptical that the proposed franchise tag will be any more successful in curtailing free agent movement than previous measures have been.  Short of force (for example, lengthening rookie contracts and/or giving teams more options at the ends of those deals), I think the league can't win this battle.

On a somewhat related topic, isn't one of the league's - or at least the owners' - largest problems the amount of guaranteed money being lost on bad free agent deals?  Doesn't this proposal potentially make the problem of overspending worse?  It seems to work only if the league can get more cutbacks on free agent contracts, in both years and money.

Maybe I'm missing something - in fact, I'd bet on it - but this proposal doesn't seem like it would change anything.



Since: Sep 3, 2009
Posted on: May 11, 2011 3:50 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

Does it really matter if you make $25M a year or $20M other than the ego of being at the top



Since: Dec 27, 2006
Posted on: May 11, 2011 3:44 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

If I was a player I would hate this idea. It is essentially forced labor. Yes players can hold out or refuse to play, but that is a hassle that they shouldn't have to go through. Once their contract expires they should be able to play wherever they would like to play unless their contract is a lifetime contract.

I realize that there are some good benefits to this proposal, but it greatly bends the principle of what a contract is all about.


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