Blog Entry

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

Posted on: May 11, 2011 1:46 pm
Edited on: May 11, 2011 2:08 pm
 
The NBA has reportedly proposed a "franchise tag" to the National Basketball Players Association. Posted by Ben Golliver.

Player movement is one of the key issues facing the NBA as it negotiates its next Collective Bargaining Agreement with the National Basketball Players Association. The NBA is a copycat league, and with each playoff series victory that the Miami Heat accumulates, the likelihood that other star players will team up to pick a destination spot in free agency increases.

SI.com reports that the NBA has proposed a "franchise tag", a designation that would potentially increase the incentive for star players to remain with their current team rather than bolt in free agency.
A team would be allowed to designate one player for preferential contractual treatment, including more overall money, more guaranteed money and at least one extra year on his contract. A player would have to agree to such a designation. It is designed to work as an incentive to get a player to remain with his team rather than as a roadblock to free agency, the sources said. 

...

The idea behind the league’s new proposal would be to increase the gap between what teams can offer a “designated player” and what non-designated players can get on the open market.
The National Football League's franchise tag essentially delays free agency by granting the team the ability to lock a player into an extra year. The NBA's version, as described in the report, would work more like a negotiating tie-breaker than as a method of restriction. 

Teaming up isn't a new phenomenon and it's one the league has worked to control for decades. Under the current Collective Bargaining Agreement, star players like LeBron James, Chris Bosh, Carmelo Anthony and Dwight Howard had an extra financial incentive to remain with their current team. In the case of James and Bosh last summer, though, that incentive wasn't enough to keep them from bolting to the Heat. Strengthening those incentives makes sense.

If a star player like, say, Joe Johnson hit free agency under this system, the Atlanta Hawks would be able to go financially above and beyond any other offers to retain him. After testing the waters last summer, Johnson re-signed with the Hawks in part because they were able to make him the largest contract offer. This franchise tag, as outlined, would have further strengthened Atlanta's position by increasing the distance between their maximum offer and the offers his other suitors were able to make. Bolting, therefore, would come at an additional financial cost to him.

Money is a powerful motivator. It's already the single biggest reason why many players choose to stay put rather than team up. Providing an additional incentive in this manner would marginally decrease player movement and provide an added protection to the teams, especially to those located in smaller markets. 

As described, there's no reason for the players to balk at this proposal because it would only affect the most highly-coveted players and it would incentivize their loyalty rather than limit their options.  The vast majority of teams should welcome this development. At first glance, this looks like a win-win.
Comments

Since: Jan 22, 2009
Posted on: May 11, 2011 3:44 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

The biggest problem with this is the star players (LeBron, Dwight Howard, etc.) make significantly more more throught they're sponsership deals than they do their salaries.  So this would give incentive to say...Joe Johnson, who doesn't command the same money as a worldwide known person, but it doesn't help make balance competitiveness in the NBA.

But really I'm of the opinion that David Stern doesn't necessarily want this anyway.  As long as the big market teams have the big name stars, the league will continue to be successful overall (see MLB).



Since: May 6, 2009
Posted on: May 11, 2011 3:36 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I see it as a good thing in a sense. If players want out than they should be able to leave. If they want to stay, but for more money this is good.



Since: May 6, 2009
Posted on: May 11, 2011 3:35 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I see it as a good thing in a sense. If players want out than they should be able to leave. If they want to stay, but for more money this is good.



Since: Jan 9, 2007
Posted on: May 11, 2011 3:32 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

It is only a good idea if the additional money doesn't count towards the cap. Otherwise this will be a big issue if they put in a hard-cap. I would be much more interested in seeing an overall cap that varies by team due to local taxes. Making it fair across the board so that a player getting $16 million in Florida doesn't have more in his pocket than a player making $16 million in Boston.........



Since: Aug 17, 2006
Posted on: May 11, 2011 2:41 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

It sounds really good until the Knicks use it on a medicore talent with a big ego.  



Since: Aug 17, 2007
Posted on: May 11, 2011 2:10 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I love the idea! That way the rich can't get richer and some teams may be able to keep their star players!



Since: Jul 26, 2009
Posted on: May 11, 2011 2:05 pm
 

Report: NBA proposes 'franchise tag' to players

I like it. This will give some teamsa chance to keep their best player. Now they need to work on the whole guaranteed contract issue. I really hope that they will give teams the option to shred one contract as well. Portland although of Prichard's own doing really got Portland into a bad contract with Roy. Really doubtful he would renegotiate it and it doesn't sound like he will be taking a medical out. This would give Portland and other teams a chance to fix a mistake.


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