Blog Entry

Dirk: Mavs partied harder after 2006 Finals

Posted on: June 26, 2011 5:39 pm
Edited on: June 26, 2011 5:43 pm
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Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki says the team partied harder after losing the 2006 NBA Finals than they did after winning the 2011 NBAdirk-club Finals. Posted by Ben Golliver.

Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki was an emotional unknown to the nation for more than a decade. A bit distant, subject to cultural barriers as an international player and not playing an overly athletic game, Nowitzki was a superstar who resided on the outskirts. He was rarely the hot story, unless you count the time he got bamboozled by his crooked fiance.

All that changed when the Mavericks defeated the Miami Heat in the 2011 NBA Finals. Nowitzki and the Mavericks were the nation's heroes, having slayed the new Evil Empire in South Florida. The enduring image of this newfound celebrity and accessibility came from South Beach's Club Liv, when Cuban, Nowitzki and company bought out the club and partied with the Larry O'Brien trophy in full view of thousands of cell phone cameras. This was the peak of happiness, the ultimate spoils for the victors. 

The Dallas Morning News reports, though, that Nowitzki told 1310 AM in Dallas that the Mavericks actually drank more following their 2006 NBA Finals loss to the Miami Heat than they did after winning the title. 
"I actually think we partied harder in '06 when we lost just to forget about it than we did now. Yeah, we've had some good nights so far, my birthday was in there. In '06, Jet picked me up for the party bus almost every day, and we went somewhere just to make us forget and have a good time. We ended up in Vegas after three hard weeks. This year, we've had a couple of good nights, but I'm 33. My body can't recover, so you have to party one day, and the next day you have to be off. You can't go back to back when you're that old. Partying once in a while gets old. But I'll definitely put in some good work when I get to Germany when I see my friends, definitely be a couple of good nights there."
This is something you wouldn't expect and we likely wouldn't have known -- in full -- had Nowitzki not earned the teflon status we give to NBA champs. It follows in a long line of revealing statements and actions that we were witness to over the last month or so. Nowitzki the enigma was replaced by Nowitzki the showman and leader. Point blank: he opened up. He admitted to the media that he ran off the court following Dallas' Game 6 win so that he could cry in the locker room by himself, expressed deep respect and appreciation for his teammates and owner Mark Cuban, and displayed a subtle but sophisticated sense of humor in his post-game press conferences, dropping unexpected quips and honest assessments on just about any topic.

Of all the great things that happened during the 2010-2011 NBA season -- record TV ratings, an amazing playoffs, the emergence of young stars and new championship contenders -- getting to know a more humanized Nowitzki ranks at the top of the list. Experiencing the joys of winning with athletes is a euphoric sensation, but hearing about the pain of losing is fascinating too. Here, Nowitzki gives us both.
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Comments

Since: Jun 27, 2011
Posted on: June 27, 2011 2:40 pm
 

Dirk: Mavs partied harder after 2006 Finals

i mean this really should not matter. its ben 5 years. so they party less isnt that good??? i mean at least they dont have riots like la does :)



Since: Aug 16, 2007
Posted on: June 27, 2011 9:48 am
 

Dirk: Mavs partied harder after 2006 Finals

Love the article and of course the Mavs. My wife and I had season tickets for the 2006 season and were completely heartbroken by the series loss. We continue to be Mavs Fans For Life and the whole organization make it easy to be one. We have met most of the players and also have autographs of many of them, along with Mark Cuban the owner. What many people may not know is that not only are the players and the rest of the organization passionate, but they are also very compassionate. There are many times at signings I've went to around the country where a player will only sign a specific item or for only a specific time, but Mark and the rest of the players have went above and beyond the call of duty to show how much they appreciate the fans. The first time we met JET he signed for over 3 hours to make sure everyone who came got a signature (please keep in mind that he was only suppose to sign for an hour). And of the 9+ years I've been here in the Dallas area I've enjoyed it greatly. My wife has been a fan since the 80's and this championship as the players mentioned many times is more for the "old timers" as it is for them. Thanks again for the article to show everyone what true fans here have known for years. I can't imagine the pressure of being a professional athlete. But seeing someone who has reached the top after many years of hard work, to continue to love the game and still be humble is a lesson I hope my kids will learn. I just wish some of the "kids" coming into the league now would also learn that lesson. But again if someone gave me millions of dollars in my early years, not so sure I wouldn't continue to be childish.




Since: Jun 8, 2009
Posted on: June 27, 2011 9:36 am
 

Dirk: Mavs partied harder after 2006 Finals

The Mavs are some what like a Twins or Devil Rays in the MLB.  they go under the radar and are not a seek and destroy type team when it comes to big names.  Don't get me wrong,  The Mavs have fire power but Jason Terry isn't a guy you hear about a lot.  The dude is big time, but he doesn't need the spot light.  Dirk, Marion, Kidd...Christ, I didn't even know Kidd was still in the league until the playoffs.  This Mavs team is what I'm talking about,  they have big names that don't need the big time attention and everyone wasn't bought to "win now".

Everyone outside of South Beach wanted to see the Heat fail, lose, crash and burn.  When you go out and buy your team to win now,  people want you to fail.  Not that making it to finals is a failure, but they were expected to win it.  Same as the yankees or red Sox, they have money to buy the big names,  I hope the brewers beat the Red Sox in the world series this year.  Boy that's wishful thinking.



Since: May 26, 2009
Posted on: June 26, 2011 11:28 pm
 

Dirk: Mavs partied harder after 2006 Finals

Couldn't agree with you more Starblazer!!! And for the Mavericks to celebrate right there in Miami is the ultimate in poetic justice. The Heat represent just about everything that people hate in pro sports nowadays, and the whole country will forever be indebted to Dallas for stifling LeBron and co. for at least one more season. I can't think of a more unlovable north american pro sports franchise ever. Not even the New York Yankees or the Dallas Cowboys of yore reeked of such arrogance... at least those teams won their respective league championships before celebrating!!! If LeBron can go at least a full decade without a title (2013) I would be satisfied Tongue out



Since: Dec 27, 2007
Posted on: June 26, 2011 9:58 pm
 

Dirk: Mavs partied harder after 2006 Finals

Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki was an emotional unknown to the nation for more than a decade. A bit distant, subject to cultural barriers as an international player and not playing an overly athletic game, Nowitzki was a superstar who resided on the outskirts. He was rarely the hot story, unless you count the time he got bamboozled by his crooked fiance.

Cultural barriers? The dude speaks better English then 95% of NBA players.

He's not overly athletic? A 7-footer who plays like he's 6-4? Incredibly dumb statement #2.

Resided on the outskirts? Where did he play in Sacramento? The dude was in the NBA Finals and is a former league MVP.

Thanks Dirk and Dallas for sparing up the arrogance of Miami and their fans. If they would have won, it would have been simply a classless affair of chest-thumping and fair-weather, band-wagon jumping fans acting like buffoons. Instead, we got a joyous celebration of a real team.



The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com