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Blog Entry

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

Posted on: November 2, 2011 12:29 pm
 
By Matt Moore

Billy Hunter says the union isn't going an inch below 52 percent of BRI for the players. The league is saying, and leaking heavily, that it won't go above 50 percent for the players. So that pretty much seems to be the end of the conversation. 

But it's not. You just have to look around at people around the issues.

Glan Davis posted on Twitter Wednesday:

 


So that's fun. Not sure if that's "Take the 51 percent that we're willing to go to, NBA!" or "Take the 51 percent they're offering, Billy Hunter and Derek Fisher!" but it's certainly a player going below the 52 percent mark, which was set after LeBron James and other swore not to go below 53 percent.

So why on earth would Glen Davis think the owners would go for 51 percent? Oh, how about because Mark Cuban's brother tweeted this in response on Wednesday morning:

 


Now, granted, this is coming from the brother of Mark Cuban, who has switched sides in the past few weeks to become one of those pushing for a deal and notably linked to reports about helping bring the BRI to within range of a deal. It's a long way from any sort of movement. But if nothing else, the two public comments indicate that there's more movement here than either side is letting on, if they'd just get their egos out of the way.  
Comments

Since: May 25, 2007
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:59 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

Not to smart are you buddy...1% of 1 million is 10,000. Correct spelling od Salery is SALARY!!!! I stopped after those two blatant mistakes which tell me you are no older than 10....



Since: May 20, 2011
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:52 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

As stated by others, I do not believe that the split of revenue is as important as the hard cap / soft cap issue. If a hard cap is in place, then there is an absolute limit on BRI generated by the league. If a soft cap exists then the total income available to players rises. Obviously the large market teams such as New York, Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, and a few others are the prime beneficiaries. Throw in Dallas, Orlando, and Miami as other teams willing to spend and the total pot for the players will continue to grow. Once a hard cap is in place the split of revenue beomes more important. If I am not seeing this in proper persepective please let me know. 

The advantage for lower level players in small markets is reflected in the need for those franchises to pay for a player who will give hope to the fan base that the team is actually trying to compete. This improves the market for lesser players and provides some false hope for fans in small markets that their teams actually have a chance to be relevant in today's NBA. 

If the leage does not institute a hard cap then the league's future is bleak. Nobody watches the regular season because the playoffs are longer than the NFL regular season. If the playoffs started this year without the regular season and the participants were picked by the commissioner I doubt if even the fans in Sacramento, Milwaukee,  Minnesota, Washington, New Jersey and a few others would be upset when they were not included. They certainly would not be missed by the rest of us.

Stern is not the guy to put this league on the right track. He has presided over its demise and relevance. 



Since: Oct 23, 2006
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:48 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

50-50 is a fair split.  Just do it!



Since: Apr 13, 2009
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:37 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

your have to remember that 1% of 1 million is 100,000.00.  Thats the equivilant of normal 2 years salery.  Now I don't know all the numbers but,  with the players million dollar contracts plus 50 or 51 or 52% of shared revenue should be substancially enough to pay the bills and make quality investments for after thier basketball careers.  Anyways the season is already a wash; no preseason means these players will be performing horribly for months, just look what no preseason did to football, the scoring is all over the map, and the quality of play varies extremely from week to week (i.e. Saints & Rams game).  Boycott basketball like they are boycotting the fans, venues and employees that depend on the NBA for a living!




Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:34 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

Are you paying attention: THE PLAYERS WERE GUARNTEED 57% UNDER THE OLD DEAL AND THEY HAVE OFFERED TO REDUCE IT TO 52% THATS ABOUT A 200 MILLION DOLLAR CONCESSION PER YEAR!!!!!!!!! HOW ABOUT YOU STOP WHINING!

The 200 million dollar reduction per year means nothing when the owners have been losing 300 million plus per season for the last few years.  What part of that math is difficult for you to comprehend?  In the real world contract or no contract most businesses would have declared bankruptcy and shut the doors.  The owners deserve to profit, just as the players profit every single season regardless of how successful or not successful they are.  It only makes sense.... I have no idea where player supporters get their logic.   And don't come back to me with the "owners aren't losing 300 million per season" argument because it doesn't matter what you think.  The union knows an official audit was done and the owners proved they were losing a lot of money..... end of story. 



Since: May 30, 2007
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:30 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

It doesn't matter how many times you post. You're wrong every time.



Since: May 30, 2007
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:26 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

First Micky Arison-Owner of the Heat throws the rest of the league owners under the bus and now some knucklehead who says he's Mark Cuban's brother states the Owners have 1%  in their back pocket to close this out.

What do both lame brains have in common?? They have loads of money, own teams in a hot climate and a large population to draw from. Sure they have nothing to lose by settling. They have loads of players who will form mini all-star teams to come and play for them.

They shouldn't be so short minded and think of the rest of the league in small markets. No players say "Hey let's play in Milwaukee".

Either get a hard cap or disband all teams except for -Maimi, Los Angeles, New York, Dallas and Chicago"



Since: Feb 1, 2009
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:16 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

I think it has more to do with symbolism than what the actual 1-2% is in dollars. Take the 51% and let's play!

Pretend the BRI is a pie. The owners want it cut equally into 2 pieces. The players want the slightly bigger slice, while the owners are investing their money into the league to turn a profit. They don't just own the team out of courtesy to pay the players to play basketball.

The owners are tired of losing money and will not accept a deal of at least break even (50% apparently), and I wouldn't either. So no, it's not as easy as Big Baby suggests when that 1% is the difference between losing money and breaking even. The players still make money no matter what.



Since: Feb 1, 2007
Posted on: November 2, 2011 1:57 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

its the NBA, why care?  I hope they dismantle the league.



Since: Sep 27, 2006
Posted on: November 2, 2011 1:55 pm
 

Cuban's brother comments about 51 percent offer

What does he care?  It's not his money.  Easy for him to say, since he just wants to get back in his courtside seat.  How much are NBA players worth in our society?  The short answer is "as much as they can get."  I'd agree.  It just shows what a disgrace our society is these days.  We have a terrible economy, but somehow find billions to pay our best basketball players.  Think about that.


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