Blog Entry

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Posted on: April 15, 2011 11:07 am
Edited on: April 15, 2011 11:10 am
 
Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It's come too late to save Tennessee's infamous last-second -- or more accurately, post- last-second -- Music City Bowl loss to North Carolina. But in the wake of the Tar Heels saving themselves from watching the clock run out by accidentally committing an offensive penalty, the NCAA has now officially followed the NFL's lead in instituting a 10-second runoff for offensive infractions inside the final minute of either half.

Technically, the runoff isn't mandatory; the defending team has the option of declining both it and the penalty if they happen to be behind.

The new rule was recommended in February by the NCAA's Football Rules Committee and approved by the Playing Rules Oversight Panel, who naturally led their release with the panel's relatively minor change to receivers' ability to block below the waist. The NCAA also offers no recommendations on what to call the new clock regulation, though the "Dooley Rule" has to be the leader in the clubhouse.

Reviewing the other rules changes:
  • Previously, receivers' below-the-waist blocks (i.e. "cut" blocks, though you knew that already) were determined to be legal based in part on how close they were to the line-of-scrimmage or whether they were in motion. Now, unless they start the play within seven yards of the center (essentially, as a tight end), receiver's cut blocks must be made against a player facing them or headed towards the sideline. It sounds confusing, but from the official's perspective, disregarding the previous qualifications in favor of "have you lined up inside the tackle box or as a tight end or not?" has simplified things. We think.
  • The panel gave final approval to two rules changes already decided on last year, the more noteworthy of which is the shift of taunting penalties to live ball fouls, giving the officials the right to revoke a touchdown based on unsportsmanlike conduct while the touchdown is being scored.. No doubt you've read -- and complained -- about this decision plenty already.
  • The other change? Coaches will be allowed monitors in their coaching booths to watch a live broadcast of the game--and, to the point, determine if a replay challenge should be issued or not. As a result, we could see a slight uptick in the effectiveness of challenges in college football this coming season.
Comments

Since: Mar 6, 2008
Posted on: April 16, 2011 3:36 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

I agree with the runoff rule.  No one wants to see a team rewarded for committing a penalty. 

I completely disagree with the taunting rule.  Total overreaction.  The penalty should be tacked on the kick off like it has always been.  We live in America for Christ sakes.  Sportsmanship is a foreign ideal.  We are about winning and losing.  To victor go the spoils.  Just look at our economy.  No sportsmanship there.




Since: Oct 18, 2009
Posted on: April 16, 2011 12:35 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

And we're one step closer to regulating the competitiveness out of football. How does this reduce competitiveness, you ask? Just like any other scenario where a team loses close, the very last play isn't the determining factor. It was a quirky situation, sure, but it's not like Tennessee didn't have chances earlier on in the game to put the game away. They didn't, and now we have to see even more rules added. The more complicated we make the rulebook, the less likely the refs are to get the simple rules right. In life and in sports, more rules = less competition.



Since: Nov 19, 2006
Posted on: April 16, 2011 10:20 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

I think both rule changes are necessary.  We do not want to see another Tennessee-North Carolina fiasco.  Fortunately, that came in a rather meaningless bowl game (unless you are a Tennessee or UNC fan), but it could have happened in a major bowl game or a critical regular season game.  I also agree with the live ball taunting rule.  Today's players are so overwhelmingly immature that this rule must be enforced strctly.  Most college players act like 8 year olds when they score.  They could be behind 42-0 and finally punch one in against the 3rd string, but they will act like they just won the BCS Championship.  That nonsense has to stop, and since the colleges insist on taking players with no brains, common sense, or social skills (other than getting arrested) this is the only step available, short of throwing them out of the game, which also would be a great idea.



Since: Sep 25, 2006
Posted on: April 16, 2011 10:20 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

The taunting penalty would be a great change.  These kids need to shut up and play football; leave the smack talking to us fans.



Since: Oct 25, 2007
Posted on: April 16, 2011 9:08 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

I absolutely LOVE the taunting penalty.  Despite the griping from those who will never understand the concept of "sportsmanship" this rule will better the game.  I also think the 10 second runoff rule is a positive change.



Since: Sep 7, 2009
Posted on: April 16, 2011 8:58 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

<h2>Scenario (A):<br />6 seconds left on the clock and you're down by 5 on the opposing team's 10 yard line. You burn a timeout to draw up the next play. Line up for the snap. Whistle stops the play. False start. Game over.<br /><br />Not so. The clock has to be running for there to be a runoff. <br />Scenario(B):<br />20 seconds left on the clock and you're down by 5 on the opposing team's 15 yard line. Out of timeouts, you rush line up and snap the ball with 15 seonds showing. The TE sneaks across the middle and snags a 10 yard pass. Clock stops at 9 seconds for the first down, but a flag was thrown. The TE was ineligible because the slot reciever covered him up. Game over<br /><br />Not so - this penalty would not cause a 10 second runoff as it did not prevent a snap. Same for the rest of your scenarios except the last one. <br /><br />Here's the whole rule - <br /><br /><strong><span>Rule
3-4-4 (New Article) </span></strong><spa
n><span>

10-Second Subtraction from Game Clock

ARTICLE 4.

a. With the game clock running and less than one minute remaining in either half, if a player of either team commits a foul that causes the clock to stop, the officials may 3

subtract 10 seconds from the game clock at the option of the offended team. The fouls that fall in this category include but are not limited to:

(1) Any foul that prevents the snap (e.g., false start, encroachment, defensive offside by contact in the neutral zone, etc.);

(2) Intentional grounding to stop the clock;

(3) Incomplete illegal forward pass;

(4) Backward pass thrown out of bounds to stop the clock;

(5) Any other foul committed <em>with the intent of stopping the clock. </em>

The offended team may accept the yardage penalty and decline the 10-second subtraction. If the yardage penalty is declined the 10-second subtraction is declined by rule.

b. The 10-second rule does not apply if the game clock is not running when the foul occurs or if the foul does not cause the game clock to stop (e.g., illegal formation).

c. Following enforcement of the penalty and 10-second subtraction (if any) the game clock starts on the referee’s signal.

d. If the fouling team has a timeout remaining it may avoid the 10-second subtraction by using a timeout. In this case the game clock starts on the snap following the timeout.

</span></span></h2&g
t;




Since: Sep 7, 2009
Posted on: April 16, 2011 8:50 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Pulling lineman can cut. Not letting flankers or wideouts come back and take out a linebackers knees on a toss sweep or any other play run wide is a good thing. Just one foot sitting in the tackle box will still allow a slot back to cut an LB, though. Still dangerous.




Since: Apr 14, 2011
Posted on: April 16, 2011 3:03 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

The taunting penalty is overreaction.  The whole team should not be penalized by forfeiting the touchdown.  The officials should throw the offending player out of the game or if the penalty is late in the game, the conference should suspend the scofflaw for next game. These guys like their playing time more than anything.

Cut blocks are dangerous.  Ban them all together.  Pulling linemen are not allowed to cut block so why should receivers?



Since: Sep 15, 2008
Posted on: April 16, 2011 2:29 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Scenario (A):
6 seconds left on the clock and you're down by 5 on the opposing team's 10 yard line. You burn a timeout to draw up the next play. Line up for the snap. Whistle stops the play. False start. Game over.

Scenario(B):
20 seconds left on the clock and you're down by 5 on the opposing team's 15 yard line. Out of timeouts, you rush line up and snap the ball with 15 seonds showing. The TE sneaks across the middle and snags a 10 yard pass. Clock stops at 9 seconds for the first down, but a flag was thrown. The TE was ineligible because the slot reciever covered him up. Game over.

Scenario (C):
9 seconds left on the clock and you're down by 3 on the opposing team's 40 yard line. You need 10 more yards to get inside your kickers range. You burn a timeout to get the play in. You line up for the snap and the officals signal the ready for play. The game clock is stopped but the play clock runs. The QB sees an obvious problem with the formation and calls an audible. The crowd is too loud and he has to repeat himself. Whistle. Delay of game. Game over.

Scenario (D):
Down by 4 your reciever makes a fantastic one-handed grab and high steps across the goal line with 3 seconds left in the conference championship game - capping a 28 point comeback. Flag for unsportsmanlike conduct. The touchdown is taken off the board plus a 10 second runoff. Game over.


Honestly, I am not sure whether the NCAA knows what it's doing or not. It seems they could either be completely ignorant of the effect these asinine rules have, or they are bent on 'showing everyone who's boss'. One of the biggest rules officials have for themselves is that they are not to decide the outcome of the game (allegedly). These rules force them to do exactly that. I think the 10 second runoff is a terrible idea. So is penalizing a team with a loss based on some overbearing bureaucracy that feels the need to control the most minute behavior. It is human nature to celebrate when you get excited at doing something great, now you wnat to completely crush these young men if they get too happy for winning the game. You want to make a point? Suspend them for a game...don't make them lose it.



Since: Mar 20, 2007
Posted on: April 16, 2011 1:44 am
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

piss on you moron.  i live in knoxville and i am a big ten fan throughout.  tennessee sucks.  they don't have any coaches worth a crap in any of there sports,  and i am including that crench jaw looking pat summit.   geno almost has caught her in national championships in half the time.  play geno you gutless coward.   back to dooley,  who cares it was the music s  itty bowl.   tennessee sucks.   5-7 next year.  maybe 6-6 if they don't lose to montana.   damn buddy,  quit whining.
Your grammar and punctuation, or lack of it, is indicatibe indeed of you being a Big-10 fan.  Were you Katzenmoyer's tutor?


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