Blog Entry

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:33 am
Edited on: July 19, 2011 11:50 am
 
Posted by Tom Fornelli

Yesterday LSU head coach Les Miles talked about how important it is to cooperate with the NCAA in any investigation, saying that it was "fundamental" and "necessary." Miles said that when asked about LSU's recent discussion with the NCAA regarding its relationship with Will Lyles. While that's a situation that likely won't be resolved for some time, LSU may find out shortly how cooperating with the NCAA can be beneficial to a program when it comes to possible penalties.

In 2010 LSU self-reported recruiting violations that took place in 2009 to the NCAA and had a hearing in front of the Committee on Infractions this past April. Now, according to a tweet from Yahoo's Charles Robinson, the NCAA has a conference call this afternoon to discuss the committee's decision in regards to LSU's case.



The violations LSU reported stem from the recruitment of former defensive tackle signee Akiem Hicks and former assistant coach D.J. McCarthy.  LSU found that McCarthy's recruitment of Hicks included improper phone contact, transportation and housing. Hicks never attended LSU and McCarthy was relieved of his duties after the violations were found. LSU also self-imposed recruiting sanctions on the program by docking two scholarships in its 2011 recruiting class along with its 2012 class.

Whether the NCAA will impose any further sanctions against LSU, well, we'll find out soon enough it seems. Though since LSU self-reported the issue, imposed its own sanctions and cooperated with the NCAA, I wouldn't expect any possible further punishment to be too severe.
Comments

Since: Mar 25, 2009
Posted on: July 19, 2011 3:51 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

OSU's violations are not recruiting violations.

this is one comment you got that was right, unfortunatly, OSU's violations are much more severe with lieing to the ncaa and covering up infractions, but considering that the ncaa is also investigating improper benefits through car lots and other places around columbus, ill wait until the ncaa's findings come back before assuming that those improper benefits didnt leak over to the recruiting trail,

 im sure you will come back with a comment like, "oh but the ncaa is also investigating lsu on the will lyles stuff" which is true, but if you had read the newest yahoo sports article with will lyles, he specifically tells the reporters that lsu used him as a legitamite recruiter, whereas oregon used him for his influence over recruits, and he backs it up with email and phone conversations, there is a big difference between a $25,000 payment that doesnt come with any paperwork or film, compared to a $5,000 payment where lyles was required to provide lsu with film and documented recruiting paperwork on recruits, because thats what he was doing for lsu, recruiting which is perfectly legal, where as oregon didnt ask him for anything, other than convincing texas high school football players to attend school in oregon, which is illegal because if he is being paid for his influence to sway recruits to oregon, that means he is working in the interest of the school, which makes him a booster, not a recruiter,

id say the mad hatter is running as clean a ship as any coach out there, it shows that it doesnt take cheating to be successful in this sport, the problem is cheating is just too easy for those who are immoral enough to do so like jim tressel and chip kelly, if you understood the enviroment miles came from at okie state where there has been 0 tolerance policy for cheating after okie state got hit with probation back in the late 80's, you know why okie state doesnt cheat?  because t boone pickens pulled all of his money out of the school and told them to shape up, so when literally millions of a boosters dollars are hanging in the balance, and all you have to do is not cheat, you would think the school would be smart about it and choose the money over cheating, and miles was the first coach since the 80's that had back to back winning seasons at the school, so obviously he non-cheating ways have crossed over to lsu, and i couldnt be happier  



Since: Mar 25, 2009
Posted on: July 19, 2011 3:27 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

OSU fired (effectively) Tressel

wrong, i recall i believe the president gordon gee making the comment, "i just hope he (tressel) doesnt fire me" so no, i dont believe tressel was fired, he took the appropriate action and stepped down since his bosses were too interested in winning football games than to hold their coach to a higher standard than lieing to the administration and the ncaa

How is LSU's action more severe? 

once again, tressel wasnt fired, but mccarthy sure was, the school proposed suspending tressel for 2 games, tressel was the one who increased it to 5 games, before the heat got so bad he had to resign, once again lsu fired mccarthy right out of the gate and the kid in question never attended school, the tattoo 5 in question, were allowed to play in the sugar bowl even after the school and ncaa had found out about the crime, lsu imposed a loss of 2 scholarships for 2 straight seasons, im yet to see ohio state impose any scholarship reductions, they would rather wait on the ncaa's hammer to come down, so i cant help but wonder what situation your looking at the determine that ohio state took the appropriate actions when the crimes were uncovered, like i said, tressel lies to his bosses and lies to the ncaa covering up his teams infractions, ohio state proposes a 2 game suspension for tressel, the tat 5 are allowed to play in the sugar bowl after they get caught, compared to lsu, mccarthy committed violations, lsu fires him on the spot, no suspension needed, then head straight to the ncaa to self-report the violations, plus choose to punish themselves and cut out a total of 4 scholarships in 2 years, if you cant see the difference in the reactions from these 2 schools in the face of ncaa infractions, then you my friend are blind

 They fired a coach that went to the NC game 36% of his years.

yet he has won the same number as miles has, yet miles is man enough to admit wrong doing within his program rather than trying to cover it up, who knows what other skeletons are in tressels closet that helped him get to all those bcs bowls, other than a weak conference, and once again he wasnt fired, but even ASSUMING that he was actually fired, OSU waited much too long to do so to have any credibility left with me, the moment they realized the violation and its severity he should have been packing his desk up just like mccarthy

And OSU voluntarily reports more than any school in Div I.

id love to see a link where you got that piece of info from, but if it is true, than its unfortunate that tressel chose not to follow in the footsteps of the coaches at OSU that dont cover up infractions




Since: Dec 1, 2010
Posted on: July 19, 2011 2:46 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

And that's the issue.  A favored few coaches can drop the dime on a rival and sit back and laugh.  Nobody will ever see any thing other than "you cheat"  



Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: July 19, 2011 2:44 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

OSU's violations are not recruiting violations.  OSU fired (effectively) Tressel.  How is LSU's action more severe?  They fired a coach that went to the NC game 36% of his years.  And OSU voluntarily reports more than any school in Div I.



Since: Dec 3, 2006
Posted on: July 19, 2011 1:48 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

Compared to what Ohio State has done, it would seem that LSU over-penalized themselves. LSU said they would handle it and emphatically did so, which is to their credit. Their violation would seem to be a small percentage of the violations currently under consideration relating to the Buckeyes, and they (OSU) didn't have the wisdom or the fortitude to give themselves as much punishment as LSU saw fit to levy. One more reason why the NCAA needs to really come down on the Buckeyes. LSU fired the coach in question, the kid never played there, and they still give themselves a loss of two scholarships in each of two years. OSU didn't even suggest that! I give LSU all the credit in the world for how they handled this, and the NCAA should say thanks and move on. Then they should give the Buckeyes the penalties that they refused to give themselves. Let's reward good behavior and penalize bad behavior.

It's funny that this is not mentioned or even noticed when the discussion turn to how schools handle their infractions.  No, the conversation always goes to how everyone does it or anything else to deflect the discussion.  Because of the infraction, I think LSU handed themselves an appropriate punishment which is why nothing is likely to happen further.  Maybe this is also why it is not discussed much.  Nobody wants to think that some programs try to self punish appropriately and it's more comfortable to sleep to the tune of "everyone else does it so why shouldn't we."



Since: Nov 5, 2007
Posted on: July 19, 2011 1:45 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

When compared to the penalties that Ohio State proposed for their violations, it would seem that LSU over-penalized themselves. I give them all the credit in the world. The coach was fired, the kid never played there, and LSU still penalized themselves 4 scholarships over two years. They showed more fortitude then OSU will ever dream of! The LSU violations are nothing more than a blip on the map that was apparently created in Columbus. The Buckeyes didn't suggest the loss of one scholarship, let alone four. They were absolutely ridiculous to suggest basically no penalty at all. The NCAA should reward LSU's good behavior and leave them alone, and spend their time leveling actual penalties against those that see no error in their ways. LSU decided to "man up". OSU decided to ignore and justify. Let the penalties fit the crimes.



Since: Nov 5, 2007
Posted on: July 19, 2011 1:35 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

Compared to what Ohio State has done, it would seem that LSU over-penalized themselves. LSU said they would handle it and emphatically did so, which is to their credit. Their violation would seem to be a small percentage of the violations currently under consideration relating to the Buckeyes, and they (OSU) didn't have the wisdom or the fortitude to give themselves as much punishment as LSU saw fit to levy. One more reason why the NCAA needs to really come down on the Buckeyes. LSU fired the coach in question, the kid never played there, and they still give themselves a loss of two scholarships in each of two years. OSU didn't even suggest that! I give LSU all the credit in the world for how they handled this, and the NCAA should say thanks and move on. Then they should give the Buckeyes the penalties that they refused to give themselves. Let's reward good behavior and penalize bad behavior.



Since: Jul 19, 2011
Posted on: July 19, 2011 1:21 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

Hopefully, the NCAA will decide to close up shop. That would be the best thignfor everyone....



Since: Oct 29, 2007
Posted on: July 19, 2011 12:38 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

The fact that LSU self disclosed is important.  It seems to indicate that the LSU assistant wasn't just a scape goat acting on head coach's orders.  But the whole environment of "cheating" that is constantly in the news lately makes it harder to believe that this is just an isolated incident.  Especially given the current investigation regarding Lyles.  Seems that the NCAA has to function with a "guilty till proven innocent" assumption.



Since: Oct 29, 2007
Posted on: July 19, 2011 12:35 pm
 

NCAA to discuss COI decision on LSU today

The fact that LSU self disclosed is important.  It seems to indicate that the LSU assistant wasn't just a scape goat acting on head coach's orders.  But the whole environment of "cheating" that is constantly in the news lately makes it harder to believe that this is just an isolated incident.  Especially given the current investigation regarding Lyles.  Seems that the NCAA has to function with a "guilty till proven innocent" assumption.


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