Blog Entry

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

Posted on: October 27, 2011 3:15 pm
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Posted by Adam Jacobi

For the last few years, a growing drumbeat has sounded about the gap in scholarship money and the "full cost of attendance," which would cover the everyday college expenses that fall outside the purview of what's covered by a full scholarship. Athlete advocates have called such a gap unfair, especially with how many restrictions exist on how athletes may earn extra money. Now, it appears the NCAA has not only listened, it has agreed -- and will do something about it.

On Thursday, the NCAA approved a financial package to distribute up to $2,000 a year or enough to cover full cost of attendance (whichever is less) to "student-athletes in head-count sports (football and basketball) and those in equivalency sports who reach the value of a full scholarship." These extra funds will not be affected by Pell Grants, which is further good news for student-athletes who come from households that struggle financially.

One curious aspect of the reform is that the NCAA agreed not to revisit the $2,000 limit for three years, which could be construed as an arbitrary and excessive amount of time to evaluate whether the figure is sufficient for covering attendance costs. What would the NCAA hope to learn in the third year that it wouldn't after two?

Also of special note is a large increase in the Academic Progress Rate (APR) for postseason eligibility, which you can read about from Tom Fornelli here

Here's the rest of what the NCAA approved, compiled by Eye on College Basketball's Jeff Goodman:

- The Board also adopted the concept that coaches will be able to work with prospective and enrolled student-athletes in the summer - although the leadership council will consider alternate models in January, one that could be tied into summer school attendance.

- Junior college transfers will now need a 2.5 GPA instead of a 2.0 GPA and will also have increased core-course requirements.

- The sliding academic scale has also increased.

- Multi-year grants have been approved up to the full term of eligibility - with one-year remaining the minimum.

- Presidents also voted to allow institutions to provide financial aid to former players who remain or return to complete their degrees after exhausting their eligibility.  

Altogether, this is quite possibly the biggest piece of reform the NCAA has put forward in decades, and is certainly one of the most beneficial reforms it has offered to the players ever. Between the extra money, multi-year scholarships, and continuing aid once a student-athlete becomes just a student, the NCAA has firmly come down in favor of the players -- and against the worst abuses of big-time college sports, like oversigning.

Is this all a perfect fix? No. Can student-athletes get rich in college off of this? Of course not. But is the situation for student-athletes incrementally better than it was before this reform? Yes, substantially so, and if student-athlete welfare is high on your list of priorities, this is a welcome development.

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Comments

Since: Mar 13, 2008
Posted on: November 2, 2011 2:04 pm
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

"These athletes receive free tuition, free housing, free meals, free books, free tutors, private workout facilities, private dining halls, add to that all of the bonuses assocaited with being on one of these athletic teams, AND they get a free $2000 a semester to spend how they please?  How about they take out a loan or apply for a grant like the rest of the student population.  This is utterly ridiculous." 

I will infer from your post you never were one of "these' athletes for a few reasons.  Yes we had our own workout facility that was donated and paid for by an NFL alumni not a penny came from the university or Government for that matter.  Also we had a meal plan that allowed us to have three meals a day IN THE GENERAL POPULATION dining hall. They even did away with housing halls dedicated to solely athletes for many reasons you implied.

I actually got more "preferrential treatment in high school from my High School booster club. Steak and potato on game day, spaghetti dinners on the way home actually took a step back in college.

Being a college athlete is not as glamorous as everyone seems to think.  It was like having a 30+ hour a week job plus carrying a full class load.   



Since: Nov 20, 2008
Posted on: October 28, 2011 2:33 pm
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

This is complete and total BS.  These athletes receive free tuition, free housing, free meals, free books, free tutors, private workout facilities, private dining halls, add to that all of the bonuses assocaited with being on one of these athletic teams, AND they get a free $2000 a semester to spend how they please?  How about they take out a loan or apply for a grant like the rest of the student population.  This is utterly ridiculous. 





Since: Sep 28, 2010
Posted on: October 28, 2011 12:44 pm
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

DBowman,

You're right, college is still an option and not a requirement.  But, as a logical thinker you MUST also acknowledge that athletics is also an option and not a requirement.  So, while you say "don't sign up for loans" and "stop your whining", you should apply the same to the very topic at hand....don't play sports and don't complain it is not enough money.



Since: Sep 28, 2010
Posted on: October 28, 2011 12:34 pm
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

woody,

If that's the case at Florida AND those funds are really used to provide tangible benefits outside of padding the scholarship buffer for more athletes, then it is truly great to hear and that could be a model for how to advance this equitably.  If that were to happen across the board, then I would have no problem giving athletes an extra "cut" of the revenue.  I think people lose site that the athletics department is just another department within the construct of the university like the science, art, engineering depts, etc.  They all contribute to the success (or failure) of the university, albeit in their own ways.  Another poster said the academic students don't bring in 100,000 fans.  While this is true, they do their part at supporting the athletic department through attendance and memorabilia, but also bring in other academic students and grants through the success of their own respective departments.  It is designed to be a team effect, but the focus seems to be solely on the student athlete, which is where the rub comes in.



Since: Oct 1, 2006
Posted on: October 28, 2011 12:18 pm
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

Incredibly embarrassing for the NCAA.  
Not that its $2000, but rather that its only for men's football and basketball.
This is a rule for the SEC, nothing more.
And I guess its not the same for girls than for boys, or any other sports. I guess football players practice more often than soccer players, right?  Or men basketball players than girls?
What a joke.
I really really hope the government taxes these fools like any other business now.
Um... I don't where you get your information, but its not for football and basketball only.  NCAA policy doesn't trump the law. Title IX will still apply here.  For every $ spent on a male athlete, school will have to match that for female athletes.  If a school attempts to allny give it to male athletes, they'll have a rush of lawsuits that they will lose.



Since: Oct 1, 2006
Posted on: October 28, 2011 12:13 pm
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

If I wanted a few bucks to get a late night snack I was screwed because I had no source of income and the meal hall was normally closed by 9PM.
I lived with college football players, and you're exactly right. I don't know how many times I bought them food, cause they didn't have money.

As for what about the poor other kids going to class and having to pay their own ways.  I do not have much sympathy as these athletes have EARNED their scholarship through hard work and dedication.  Anyof those other students could have done the same thing. I would like to know how many of those other students are up @ 5:00 for mandatory workouts go to classes all day and then film and practice into the night to be followed by mandatory study hall. THEY DON"T but they deserve the same thing.
 
DEAD ON!!! I was the "poor" kid working two jobs to get through college.  Yeah, it was sucked at times, but I had more money than my athlete roomates.  They put in an unreal amount of time to football.  They worked just as hard as I did to get through school, just in a different way.

GREAT POST!



Since: Oct 1, 2006
Posted on: October 28, 2011 12:06 pm
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

OZARK:
There was a time when athletes could and did work. But then they banned it with good reason.  Why? Because local buisness, rather than donating money, will donate a fake job to high recruit, essentially making that player a paid athlete.  Letting them work is not an option.



Since: Jan 2, 2007
Posted on: October 28, 2011 11:44 am
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

DBowman did you just compare ROTC for college kids to the NCAA paying $2,000 for money maker sports? You know ROTC students are required to be in reserve if they don't do active duty? I can see how getting financial help for serving our country and playing football could be confused as to which is a higher priority.
No.  My only point to another poster was there are many alternatives to paying for higher education-- large amounts of students loans are not the only one.  Another poster was complaining about athletic scholarships being described as room & board and he/she questioned why should they get help when everybody else was saddled with loans and no hope of turning into a highly-paid professional athlete.

Serving in the military is not for everyone and I would never suggest that it is.  Some folks might not realize, however, that ROTC students can receive extra financial benefits along the way and basic health care is taken care of while they are signed up and planning to serve after graduation.  The two are apples and oranges in that respect, but serving is a valid alternative to racking up thousands of dollars in student loans which one poster made sound like was the inevitable outcome of going to college without having an athletic scholarship.



Since: Apr 29, 2011
Posted on: October 28, 2011 11:37 am
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

DBowman did you just compare ROTC for college kids to the NCAA paying $2,000 for money maker sports? You know ROTC students are required to be in reserve if they don't do active duty? I can see how getting financial help for serving our country and playing football could be confused as to which is a higher priority.



Since: Jan 3, 2007
Posted on: October 28, 2011 11:36 am
 

NCAA approves $2,000 for full cost of attendance

Sorry southerners but now without college football dominance you're back to just being known for your high percentage of illiterate adults, poor hygiene and of course fanatical racism.
Don't you just love it when ignorant bigots accuse other people of being bigots?

  


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