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NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

Posted on: December 20, 2011 2:14 pm
Edited on: December 20, 2011 6:11 pm
 



Posted by Adam Jacobi

Urban Meyer may have high hopes for his first season at Ohio State in 2012, but his team's first appearance in the postseason is going to have to wait until 2013 at the earliest. Ohio State has been given a one-year postseason ban, effective next year, by the NCAA. The NCAA also found Ohio State's offer of giving up five scholarships over three years inadequate, and will require that the Buckeyes give up a total of nine scholarships over that period instead.

The sanctions stem from a litany of NCAA violations committed by various Buckeyes and ousted head coach Jim Tressel. Terrelle Pryor was one of the worst offenders, repeatedly receiving impermissible benefits and allegedly participating in a system where he traded signed memorabilia for free tattoos, and DeVier Posey was suspended for a total of 10 games in 2011 for multiple instances of receiving impermissible benefits.

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Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith had said previously that he didn't anticipate a bowl ban for Ohio State, and Meyer told reporters after being hired that he had received "extremely positive feedback" about OSU's prospects before the NCAA.

Tressel was also given a five-year show-cause penalty by the NCAA. The "show-cause" label means that the NCAA considers Tressel a serious offender, and any NCAA school interested in employing Tressel must show why it does not deserve sanctions for doing so. The five-year sanction effectively ends Tressel's coaching career in the collegiate ranks.

Tressel's decision not to inform the NCAA of the violations once he learned of them played heavily into the decision to hit him with such a heavy penalty.

"Of great concern to the committee was the fact that the former head coach became aware of these violations and decided not to report the violations to institutional officials, the Big Ten Conference or the NCAA," the NCAA said in its report.

Tressel is now a game-day consultant for the Indianapolis Colts in the NFL.

Smith said in a statement that Ohio State would not contest the NCAA's ruling.

“We are surprised and disappointed with the NCAA’s decision,” said Smith. “However, we have decided not to appeal the decision because we need to move forward as an institution. We recognize that this is a challenging time in intercollegiate athletics. Institutions of higher education must move to higher ground, and Ohio State embraces its leadership responsibilities and affirms its long-standing commitment to excellence in education and integrity in all it does.

“My primary concern, as always, is for our students, and this decision punishes future students for the actions of others in the past,” said Smith. “Knowing our student-athletes, however, I have no doubt in their capacity to turn this into something positive – for themselves and for the institution. I am grateful to our entire Buckeye community for their continued support.”

Urban Meyer also released a statement that was even more forward-looking than Smith's.

“I agreed to become the Head Football Coach at The Ohio State University because Shelley and I are Ohio natives, I am a graduate of this wonderful institution and served in this program under a great coach. I understand the academic and athletic traditions here and will give great effort to continue those traditions.

“It is still my goal to hire excellent coaches, recruit great student-athletes who want to be a part of this program and to win on and off the field. The NCAA penalties will serve as a reminder that the college experience does not include the behavior that led to these penalties. I expect all of us to work hard to teach and develop young student-athletes to grow responsibly and to become productive citizens in their communities upon graduation.” 

Comments

Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:54 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

You're impartiality is stated in your screen name.  Moron.



So being an LSU grad and a retired Marine makes me a moron.  Whatever.  At least I know which version of "your" to use when calling someone else a moron.
Yep.  Irony is ironic, isn't it?



Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:49 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

Notorious,

I totally missed your first question -- sorry.

I have never come across an impoverished person/family that believes dropping out of school, or not getting an education, is a good thing.  I've come across many improverished people that profess that a better education is the ticket out of their family's situation.  So, having their child be offered a full-ride scholarship to pay for their education seems to be the opportunity that their parent(s) wanted for their child.  Two key questions need to be answered: 1)Did the impoverished parents ensure that their child earned their education in preschool through 12th grade? 2) Did the individual student take responsibility for their learning while in school before arriving on campus?  In many cases one's actions must match one's beliefs.

Mike Rowe - (Ford commercials dude) - put out a video (youtube him) where he went before the Senate and talked about jobs.  Mike Rowe said this: we (USA) have a high number of unemployed workers and we have a demand for skilled labor...and that's just wierd.

here is the link - hopefully: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo-cUZ2aRKc

My opinion is this: the individual is able to learn the skills in order to be employable.  Getting an education is the ticket to a better life. 

Not many people wake up every morning and say..."I want to be poor for the rest of my life"
I know of several impoverished families that don't think college is anything to be proud of.  And, again, are you smoking crack?  What does this have to do with fixing the socioeconomic problem that plagues this country?  If anything your defense of the NCAA practices preach the opposite.  Part of the problem with the impoverished is the drastic change in salaries between the average person and executive officers of that company.  Instead of a 1 household income being able to sustain a family, like it was 40-50 years ago, you need 2.  All the while, CEO's have distanced their salaries far from the average worker.  Much further than inflation would say it should.  The same thing could be said for the NCAA.  When rules were put into place to not pay college athletes, there were no television rights selling in the billions.  Schools weren't getting an $11 million bonus for making the Sugar Bowl.  Coaches weren't pulling down $4 million/year contracts.  Now?  The rule CAN be changed, but WON'T be changed because the NCAA are the same type of CEOs that are attempting to distance themselves from the common man, salary wise.  It's purely an attempt to make money off the backs of others and keep them scrounging while they live better than they deserve.



Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:39 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

So, using your 'anyway they see fit' notion: then a student-athlete should be allowed to sell drugs for cash, steal merchandise and then sell that merchandise for cash, just rob people for cash, steal computers/cars/electronics/whatever



else can be stolen and sold - for cash.
Seriously?  You're actually going to compare selling an autograph for a tattoo to breaking into someone's house and stealing their belongings?  Let me be more explicit about the differences between the two.  One is a law that violates my rights as an individual as given to me by the Constitution of the United States.  The other is a law that violates the rights of nobody outside the NCAA and the people who would profit from selling said autograph.  One is a law that is set in stone to protect my freedom and the other is a law created by a group of wealthy individuals that benefit to the tune of billions of dollars a year because of what these student athletes do week in and week out.

Is the college totor on a full-ride scholarship AND being paid for their services?
Would they be punished by the university if they were?  I'll give you a hint.  The answer is "no."

If a player is worried about risking an injury...then that players' parents should take out a life insurance policy as a precautionary measure. 
Which the parents have to pay for.
Tell me the reasons why a student-athlete can't: learn (be on track for a degree), play football, and enjoy the college experience without committing any crimes or hurting the program through their negative behavior.

Civilized society demands what of the individual?
I never said that they couldn't.  How is selling an autograph "negative behavior" or "committing any crime."
Are you against having higher academic standards?
Are you tripping face right now?  Where in the world did you get that from anything that I said?



Since: Aug 18, 2010
Posted on: December 21, 2011 4:01 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

You're impartiality is stated in your screen name.  Moron.



So being an LSU grad and a retired Marine makes me a moron.  Whatever.  At least I know which version of "your" to use when calling someone else a moron. 



Since: Oct 8, 2009
Posted on: December 21, 2011 3:36 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

Notorious,

I totally missed your first question -- sorry.

I have never come across an impoverished person/family that believes dropping out of school, or not getting an education, is a good thing.  I've come across many improverished people that profess that a better education is the ticket out of their family's situation.  So, having their child be offered a full-ride scholarship to pay for their education seems to be the opportunity that their parent(s) wanted for their child.  Two key questions need to be answered: 1)Did the impoverished parents ensure that their child earned their education in preschool through 12th grade? 2) Did the individual student take responsibility for their learning while in school before arriving on campus?  In many cases one's actions must match one's beliefs.

Mike Rowe - (Ford commercials dude) - put out a video (youtube him) where he went before the Senate and talked about jobs.  Mike Rowe said this: we (USA) have a high number of unemployed workers and we have a demand for skilled labor...and that's just wierd.

here is the link - hopefully: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qo-cUZ2aRKc

My opinion is this: the individual is able to learn the skills in order to be employable.  Getting an education is the ticket to a better life. 

Not many people wake up every morning and say..."I want to be poor for the rest of my life"



Since: Oct 8, 2009
Posted on: December 21, 2011 3:18 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

Notorious,

My second point allows more players to receive a scholarship offer.  Those student-athletes would get to have their college paid for AND play football.  Conferences that allow their members to sign 24+...and then pulling the rug out from some of those recruits is a terrible practice that must end.  Coaching staffs can easily take 21 recruits a year and develop them academically and athletically pretty easily. 

Are you against having higher academic standards?

No, not having a job does not put those impoverished students at risk.  These individuals get their education paid for and play football.  In the event that they are drafted by the NFL...they'll be paid very well.  In the event that they don't get drafted, they'll have a career in which they can get paid.

So, using your 'anyway they see fit' notion: then a student-athlete should be allowed to sell drugs for cash, steal merchandise and then sell that merchandise for cash, just rob people for cash, steal computers/cars/electronics/whatever

else can be stolen and sold - for cash.

Is the college totor on a full-ride scholarship AND being paid for their services?

If a player is worried about risking an injury...then that players' parents should take out a life insurance policy as a precautionary measure. 

Tell me the reasons why a student-athlete can't: learn (be on track for a degree), play football, and enjoy the college experience without committing any crimes or hurting the program through their negative behavior.

Civilized society demands what of the individual?





Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: December 21, 2011 2:56 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

The Solution:
Where in your "solution" do you delve into fixing the socioeconomic problem?  You say two different things.  First you talk about how an impoverished athlete can't afford the things that a more well off student can.  Then you talk about grad point averages and punishments.  The first point was very good.  The second point was ridiculously off topic and stupid.  Considering student athletes can't really hold down a job with practice and studying, doesn't that continue to put them in a more impoverished state?  Personally, I'm of the belief that student athletes should be allowed to make money any way they see fit.  Regular college kids are.  For example.  A student can tutor other students, with the education he's getting from the university, and be paid for it.  Why can't a student athlete be allowed to sell an autograph?  The solution is to just give these athletes a generous stipend for risking injury every Saturday so that ADs and coaches can continue to make millions a year.



Since: Jan 5, 2011
Posted on: December 21, 2011 2:25 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

Then again my Wolverines whipping them and finishing 11-2 (and going to the Sugar Bowl) is wonderful tasting punishment.

Whipping us? Uhm excuse me but what game did you watch. The wolverines were LUCKY to win that game. Ohio State was once again the better team on the field this year. If Miller had more time to practice with posey Bucks win that by two toucdowns. You know it's true because Miller over threw Posey ever so slightly on two clear cut touchdowns had the ball been caught. But it's ok. I'm glad to see the ohio state michigan rivalry look like it has a prestigious future once again. Good luck to you guys in the Sugar Bowl. Prove critics of you wrong. Show that you deserve to be there.



Since: Apr 2, 2011
Posted on: December 21, 2011 2:10 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

You're impartiality is stated in your screen name.  Moron.




Since: Aug 18, 2010
Posted on: December 21, 2011 2:00 pm
 

NCAA gives Ohio St. bowl ban, Tressel show-cause

I have to disagree.  When sCam called the coach at Miss. St. and said "the money is too good" that says he knew.  The NCAA believed everything that was said by that coach why not that?


I believe you have been reading too many internet rumors.  I do not think Cam called a coach and told him anything of the sort.  There was a rumor that he called a player at MSU and told him that, but I do not believe that any player or coach told the NCAA anything of the sort. 


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