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Blog Entry

Texas is the most valuable football program

Posted on: December 22, 2011 1:25 pm
Edited on: December 22, 2011 1:26 pm
 
Posted by Tom Fornelli

They may have only won a total of 12 games in the last two seasons, but that lack of success hasn't done much to change the bottom line for the Texas Longhorns. Forbes has released its list of the most valuable college football programs in the country and, to no surprise, Texas is once again at the top of the list.

Forbes estimates that the program is worth $129 million.
Texas’ total value is driven largely by a football profit of $71 million last season, up from $65 million in 2009. Texas football generated $96 million in revenue, $36 million of which came from ticket sales. Another $30 million was comprised of contributions tied to amenity seating like club seats and luxury suites. The Longhorns also benefited from $10 million worth of sponsorship deals, with Coca-Cola, Nike and PepsiCo’s Gatorade giving a combined $2 million last year.
What is somewhat surprising, however, is that number doesn't even include the revenue from the school's new Longhorn Network. No, those numbers won't be included until next year, so I'm going to go out on a limb right now and predict that Texas will once again be considered the most valuable football program at the end of 2012 as well.

Yeah, that's right. I said it. I'm putting myself out there.

Here's the top ten schools listed with their estimated value.

1. Texas ($129 million)
2. Notre Dame ($112 million)
3. Penn State ($100 million)
4. LSU ($96 million)
5. Michigan ($94 million)
6. Alabama ($93 million)
7. Georgia ($90 million)
8. Arkansas ($89 million)
9. Auburn ($88 million)
10. Oklahoma ($87 million)
Comments

Since: Dec 3, 2007
Posted on: December 23, 2011 10:26 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

Yeah, I cannot see how Ohio State is not on that list. And Florida State. And Florida. Nebraska. 
 



Since: Dec 5, 2011
Posted on: December 23, 2011 7:19 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

It would be interesting to see the details behind your analysis....because I am having difficulty seeing how Ohio State does not make this list.  Or Florida State.  Or Nebraska.  Or Oklahoma State, given the money that T Boone Pickens has poured into that program.

So Auburn and Arkansas both rate above those programs financially...c'mon man.



Since: Feb 11, 2009
Posted on: December 23, 2011 6:44 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

As previous posts have mentioned, football carries the weight for a good number of the total college athletic programs.  This seems to be as true now as it was when I was in school back in the early 1970's.  During the Florida-Kentucky game this year, the ESPN broadcast crew brought to light the fact that while Kentucky may be perceived as a basketball school, its the football program brings in twice as much money as does its basketball program.  What would be interesting is to see what the total balance sheet for athletic programs at different schools are.  For example, this website has previously made the assertion that a lot of football programs don't make as much money as they have to pay out.  So why not an article with the net balance sheets each year?  Another question I would ask is how much do TV contracts contribute to the value of various conferences/schools?  I am not necessarily standing in judgement, ready to talke about how much TV money corrupts the sport, but rather plainly curious for the truth.  A lot of figures are thrown around this website and others, but I would just like to see all of it together, in one place.  I certainly wonder if Texas continues on a decade of mediocrity, whether its value will continue to hold, even with the LHN.



Since: Jan 3, 2007
Posted on: December 23, 2011 4:03 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

You are looking at it completely wrong.

The revenue from football pays the freight at most of the colleges on this list.  But you are only looking at the inflow and not the out-flow.
What is this money paying for?  Not the coach's salary because most are paid by alumni groups or slush funds.  Most states have a max pay for a state employee... the remainder is payed by boosters and alumni.
No.. The money goes to
  • Scholarships.   &nbs
    p; College is not cheap. Tuition is insane expensive.  And spread across 20 sports programs?
  • Title IX.     No matter how good your womens tennis team is, it still payed for by football.
  • More Scholarships.   &nbs
    p; College is not cheap. Tuition is insane expensive.  And spread across 20 sports programs?
  • Capitol Improvements    
    ;    Want 30,000 more seats on your sold out stadium?  Fine!  But they don't come free. Neither do weight rooms, and those recruits like seeing fancy stuff!
  • Interest    &nb
    sp;     Not fan interst. That is always there as long as you win. So many precent interest compounded   We aren't the only ones that pay it.

Something to think about when you complain about how much these top ten scools are making. And just how good IS that women's gymnastics team at your college?   Not as good as Bama, is my bet





Since: Dec 7, 2011
Posted on: December 23, 2011 3:40 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

All this sounds real nice, but at some point those reach Texas oilmen and businnes leaders in dallsd, are going to want to win a few games. When u get all those good Texas recruits and are usually inthe top 5 inrecruiting. I like Mack, but seems like something is wrong



Since: Mar 26, 2011
Posted on: December 23, 2011 3:03 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

@Pferg: Cash flow likely could be negative, but UT is guaranteed the $$$ from ESPN, so it's ESPN's loss, not the Horns. The article anyway says the $$$ won't start coming until next year. While OU has had the more successful program, the Horns will continue to rule the $$$ roost.



Since: Sep 4, 2006
Posted on: December 23, 2011 3:00 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

Bowl game payout -- $15,000,000 last year
All Big 10 bowl payouts get lumped together and distributed evenly to member schools. That is why Nebraska gladly dumped the Big 12 which each school keeps its earnings even if it is grossly imbalanced over other member schools.





Since: Nov 17, 2006
Posted on: December 23, 2011 2:04 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

My guess why Ohio State isn't listed is probably the same as in previous years -- they didn't report it.  But if you do some simple math, you can probably guess at the figure.
  • 8 home games in 2010 x 100,000 tickets x $70/ticket == $56,000,000
  • Parking for 8 home games @ $15/vehicle and let's guess 50,000 spots == $6,000,000
  • Concessions during the games @ about $10/person == $8,000,000
  • Required donations to be eligible for non-student/staff/faculty season tickets and club seats are probably on-par with Texas, so figure on about $30,000,000 as well
  • Sponsorships are definitely on-par with Texas -- add another $10,000,000 at least
  • Merchandise -- easily $10,000,00/yr or more, as any visit to the Buckeye state will prove
  • Big10 network revenue -- who knows, but it's not chump change, maybe $2,000,000 per year
  • Bowl game payout -- $15,000,000 last year
That comes to $137 million, which probably isn't far from the truth.  I'd expect the actual figure to be higher in fact.



Since: Feb 4, 2007
Posted on: December 23, 2011 1:14 am
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

Since the BCS game into play in 1998:

BCS Champions in the top 10
-  6

Tex -1
LSU -2
Ala -1
Aub - 1
Ok -1

BSC Champions not in the top 10 - 7

Ten - 1
FSU - 1
Mia - 1
OSU - 1
USC - 1
Fla - 2


So what does having one of the top 10 most valuable football program mean?? NOTHING!





Since: Sep 4, 2009
Posted on: December 22, 2011 11:56 pm
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

You know you really don't have to look any further then these sports post boards to realize just how many assholes there are in the world .


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