Blog Entry

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

Posted on: January 17, 2012 3:56 pm
Edited on: January 17, 2012 3:59 pm
 


Posted by Bryan Fischer


Scandals, scholarships and rules changes were among the topics of frequent conversation at last week's NCAA Convention and while not everything president Mark Emmert wanted - the $2,000 cost of attendance stipend for example - was passed by the Legislative Council and Board of Directors, it's safe to say what happened in Indianapolis laid the ground work for significant changes that will impact schools for decades to come.

While details on most proposals from Presidential Working Groups finally emerged in some areas, the one place where there was plenty of talk but little substance was the new enforcement model that some in the organization have been tasked with reforming. After a year that included news about major infractions at Tennessee, Miami, Ohio State, North Carolina and others, it's no surprise that this would be one area of emphasis.

"We were damn mad and not going to take it anymore," Ed Ray, Oregon State president and chair of the Enforcement Working Group, said.

The Enforcement Working Group that came out of August's presidential retreat was tasked with creating a tiered violation structure, new penalty procedures, a reformed process for adjudication and a reformed process that is fair while supporting the collegiate model the organization is looking to uphold.

"In terms of what is our charge, we heard President Emmert talk about this risk-reward analysis and the fact that there seems to be a general loss of integrity and upholding the rules," Vice President for Enforcement Julie Roe Lach said. "This isn't purely a reactive move, we're not just doing this because of the scandals or if there is a crisis. We're doing this because it's the right thing to do. This is a time to redefine what are our principles and what do we stand for."

In addition to following the principles of fairness, accountability and process integrity, flexibility is one of the key things the new model is designed to address as there are currently only two categories of violations: major and secondary. The new model would have four levels (most egregious, serious, secondary, minor) with the Committee on Infractions taking into account various mitigating or aggravating factors that would then help determine penalties. While many believe the enforcement side just makes it up as they go along (and they can because they don't follow past precedent), the model should help move cases along in the system quicker and result in more consistency among penalties given out to schools.

"The working group recognizes the wide-spread perception that the current penalty model leads to inconsistent and insufficient penalties and does not adequately deter other institutions and individuals from engaging in conduct contrary to the rules," the working group's report stated. "The working group believes that the severity of the penalty imposed must correspond with the significance of the rule violation(s)."

If it all seems a bit dense and hard to understand, it is. That's why the NCAA created this proposed penalty matrix that gives you a better visual idea of what future programs will have to get used to if they break rules. For example, if you commit a serious Level I offense and there were no mitigating factors, you can expect a 2-3 year postseason ban.

"We haven't had a lot of pushback on this," Roe Lach said of the new multi-level structure. "If there's anything in the package that is a no-brainer, it seems like this may be it.

"An issue we've heard is we need to be more consistent and allow for more predictability. I think if we are more consistent, it would afford more predictability. The idea is to move toward a penalty guidelines model."

So how does it really work? Well, take the infamous USC case involving Reggie Bush and O.J. Mayo among others: violations of NCAA bylaws governing amateurism; failure to report knowledge of violations; unethical conduct; violations of coaching staff limitations; impermissible recruiting contacts by a representative of the institution's athletics interests; impermissible inducements and extra benefits; and lack of institutional control.  

According to the new model, this would be classified as multiple Level I violations with four significant aggravating factors. Here's a comparison of penalties with what the Trojans got and what they would have received under the new model:



So yes, USC would have been punished even worse under the new proposed enforcement model coming from the NCAA. That's interesting because athletic director Pat Haden is on the enforcement working group and has made it a point to say that the Trojans were unfairly punished. In other examples provided by the NCAA, Baylor's basketball program would have seen the number of scholarships available slashed in half following the school's 2005 infractions case. Instead of fewer practice hours for Rich Rodriguez and Michigan in their case, the Wolverines could have lost up to four scholarships per year. Florida State's 2009 case could have seen football scholarship losses of 10-21 per year for three years instead of the six they received.

Given the new model, expect the hammer from Indianapolis to come down harder on cheaters in the future.

Comments

Since: Oct 4, 2006
Posted on: January 18, 2012 6:29 am
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

So how does it really work? Well, take the infamous USC case involving Reggie Bush and O.J. Mayo among others: violations of NCAA bylaws governing amateurism; failure to report knowledge of violations; unethical conduct; violations of coaching staff limitations; impermissible recruiting contacts by a representative of the institution's athletics interests; impermissible inducements and extra benefits; and lack of institutional control.  

Yes I am a Trojan homer, but this list of violations  inlcudes many that have since been disproved by outside media and not connected to the university, icnluding the infamous telephone call btwn asst coach and ?socalled agent? which was shown to not the date claimed by the NCAA but one year later after the BCS championship, and all of the BBall violations were self reported and self penalized by USC. The only other violation was by a women tennis player calling overseas to family on university phones which wqas highlighted as lack of institutional control. BTW, we are talking one football player whose involvement was 165 miles away from the campus.



Since: Dec 4, 2006
Posted on: January 18, 2012 1:47 am
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

I am very happy with these new penalties because they are the beginning of the end of the ncaa First of all they will NEVER stand up in court,and I can tell you know that the NAACP and Jesse Jackson will never let it happen because of the effect it will have on minorities ( scholarship limits )



Since: Aug 21, 2006
Posted on: January 17, 2012 11:31 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

No television ban, very little punishment.



Since: Sep 10, 2007
Posted on: January 17, 2012 10:51 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

The NCAA has gutted it's ability to enforce. This is a joke. The true punishment enforcer has been taken off the table.  Of No TV time and/or no TV revenue.  Sadly the NCAA is too cowardly to do this.

Many college football teams LOSE money on post season games. So to be forbidden to not play in a bowl game just hurts the kids not the university. It is not a major deal. In fact in some ways it gets the school publicity.  USC was not hurt that much. In fact they got a lot of sympathy points and will have no problems getting recruits.  Lose a few scholarships? Big deal. There are always ways for coaches to juggle scholarships. You can give a half scholarship for track and field and half for football.  There are other ways as well.
There is also walk on talent out there who can get a scholarship for another sport like soccer or basketball. 

As for a fine of $200,000 dollar? That is pennies for about half of the institutions out there.
As for a reduction in recruiting activity. There are many social medias that the NCAA is just not aware of or knows how to enforce. 

As long as the ban of no TV for an inseason game is not on the table. Or a stoppage of TV revenue, the NCAA is just a joke.






Since: Aug 17, 2011
Posted on: January 17, 2012 10:29 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

Going to go after LSU for what? The Lyles bit I am guessing. Not sure whats there to do much about. Bama, not sure what you could be referring to on that front either. But the Bama program has been hit harder than most others.

USCw has gotten away with crap for years. It finally catches upto them, they get punished and whine fans come out of hte woodwork. Let it go, your school did the crime, so do the time. Stop fingerpointing at programs that are winning to make yourself feel better. Its is only a matter of time till most programs are caught doing something and are hammered for it. Now finally USCw gets to be part of that mix as well, no longer protected, just one of the pack like everyone else.



Since: Oct 7, 2011
Posted on: January 17, 2012 9:55 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

So what would be the penalty to Ped State for their lack of control?



Since: Sep 7, 2010
Posted on: January 17, 2012 9:50 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

do not know if Brian Fischer wrote this garbage or just posted it. Either way how about getting some facts straight before you write something the public is going to view. " USC case involving Reggie Bush and O.J. Mayo among others". A tennis player you fool. But lets stick to the subject. USC penalties involved RB and that is it. If your stupid ass cannot remember USC punished it's basketball program and the NCAA accepted that. But since we are on basketball do you remember the original problems their? It was someone trying to say they saw the coach pay someone for Mayo. Ring a bell? Since that was proven false they dreamed up recruiting violations that were never proven. The coach gets fired for no reason and sanctions handed down to the basketball program that did nothing.

So if you are to biased to tell the truth your facts will come back and bite you.  Nothing was ever proven that any coach knew of what was going on in San Diego.  Or do you need someone to explain " should have known" to you? The NCAA had to break their own by-laws, lie all with rivals on the COI a rule they , you and every other hater ignores. 

Fair? Nothing fair with the NCAA unless you live in the SEC. It took 1 felons testimony  (which he was caught lying on and the NCAA ignores to ask why he would lie) to hammer USC

A fathers admitting shopping his son, 4 players admitting taking money another football coach's word from Div-1 school  plus many others and what did Auburn  ge? A free pass.

LSU, Alabama. USCe all could easily be sanctioned heavilly but the NCAA chooses not to. Because thats fair? 



Since: Aug 12, 2006
Posted on: January 17, 2012 8:53 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

So yes, USC would have been punished even worse under the new proposed enforcement model coming from the NCAA. That's interesting because athletic director Pat Haden is on the enforcement working group and has made it a point to say that . 

Yes, and Pat Haden would have reason to continue to say the Trojans were unfairly punished, because (a) there was absolutely nothing resembling due process given the Trojans at any of the hearings, (b) the COI contained multiple members with extreme biases against USC, members who refused to recuse themselves, (c) the COI got critical facts dead wrong (they were off by a YEAR--the wrong way--on the phone call that they said proved that Coach Todd McNair knew about Reggie's shenanigans in San Diego), which the university proved, but which proof was cavalierly ignored, and (d) the COI defamed and ruined the career of an excellent assistant coach on the basis of pure conjecture, with no factual basis at all.

It does no good to make penalties consistent if the process remains a farce. 



Since: Aug 17, 2011
Posted on: January 17, 2012 8:45 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

The T-town crap? Listen the NCAA has had all that "evidence" for years now. They have said there is nothing there to even warrant further investigation. Let it go. They would have never let Trent and UA have the year they had if they could have stopped it via investigated proof of misconduct on that scale.



Since: Aug 17, 2011
Posted on: January 17, 2012 8:40 pm
 

Stiff NCAA penalties on the way with new model

Oversigning by who? People keep bringing this up, what conference oversigns anymore? An no, not the SEC, they actually implemented an in conference rule that forbades it. Frankly I never had issue with it but not sure who out there still does it.


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