Blog Entry

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

Posted on: April 15, 2011 5:34 pm
Edited on: April 15, 2011 5:40 pm
 
For all of downtown Detroit’s troubles, the NHL apparently wants to address what it sees as a major scourge. 

The tradition of tossing octopi on the ice. 

Matt Saler of the blog On the Wings reports the NHL has asked Detroit to enforce a city ordinance, which apparently caused one fan to be ejected from Wednesday’s Game 1 and put him on the hook for a $500 fine:
"Officer Bullock informed me that the enforcement of Municipal Code 38-5-4 is at the request of the NHL. Evidently, police supervisors were informed Wednesday night, either before or during the game, by League representatives that they don’t want anything thrown on the ice. An officer has to witness the throw and nab the thrower on the spot, but it’s something they can and will enforce. Apparently, distance from players is not an issue: any octopus on the ice is grounds for ejection and a fine."

The interesting part is that the Wings are not the ones asking for it. According to Officer Bullock, they’re fine with the tradition, and even like it. And I gather the police aren’t big fans of enforcing it either. It’s up to the officer’s discretion, so it’s possible fans may still get away with it at times. But with NHL officials pushing for it, it’s less safe to throw than it ever has been. Previously, it may have been a bit of an empty threat. Now it has teeth.

According to Yahoo! hockey blog Puck Daddy , NHL spokesman Frank Brown wouldn’t confirm that the league is asking for police to enforce the city code: 
"I don't believe it's anything new, but I'm waiting to hear back from our security. It's a safety issue. You throw stuff on the ice, people get their skates caught in it, they fall down and hurt themselves. It's wrong. That's a problem," said Brown, in a phone interview this afternoon.

The NHL then sent out this statement: 
"NHL security did not direct that this person be arrested or ejected. We do have a prohibition against throwing things to the ice surface since this may cause a delay in game or injury to players or others working on the ice surface."

This eight-legged controversy began to swirl when Deadspin reported an account from the fan who allegedly was the target of police:
All of a sudden, a guy from there said, "You're going to jail. Come with me." Granted, not a thing happened to the prior folks, or any other game. I went down and was charged. Really, it's AN octopus in Detroit in a hockey game! They kick me out, fined me $500 and I have to go to court. I paid $150 for my ticket [but] now will pay $500 more. That's $217 a period.

Although the tradition of throwing an octopus on the ice dates back to 1952, opponents have complained for years that chunks of the sea creature are often left on the surface. That could create a safety concern, although there have been no reports of that any player was injured because of it. The Red Wings were threatened with a $10,000 fine three years ago if famed Zamboni driver Al Sobotka swung any octopi he picked up off the ice. 

-- A.J. Perez
Comments

Since: Oct 7, 2006
Posted on: April 17, 2011 3:19 am
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

Thanks for the intelligence bowyerpa, this is the inciteful dialogue i would expect from a neanderthal. Never claimed to be a tree hugger and poited out in my first posting that i have no interest in PETA. Just trying point out how POINTLESS this "tradition" is. Your retort to my argument is very telling, thanks for opening my eyes further. btw adding DHs and changing the number of bases aren't traditions, they are rules of the game. Did I say anything about making the ice in the shape of a circle or making the goal bigger and putting 2 goalies in it? No. Traditions would be the 7th inning stretch, or people in Chicago throwing back visitors home runs. Just thought I would help you out distinguishing the difference between the two. Your welcome.



Since: Oct 7, 2006
Posted on: April 17, 2011 3:02 am
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?




Since: Jan 2, 2008
Posted on: April 17, 2011 2:56 am
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

I have a great idea, Cody.  Let us make the National league play with a DH.  Instead of four bases let there only be 3 bases on the 'diamond' better make that triangle now.  Put the ball on a tee.  No more wooden bats because we don't want any trees to suffer just to make a bat.  No more gloves made from cow hides either.  Who needs traditions in baseball?



Since: Jan 2, 2008
Posted on: April 17, 2011 2:48 am
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

etork, this isn't patty cake they are playing on the ice.  It is hockey played by grown men.  Sorry if your little feelings get hurt because some octopus died at some time during your life.  You really have no say as to what happens at or during a hockey game anyway.  Your limp wrist has never witnessed a hockey game ever because hockey isn't a pansy game.  We won't miss you at the game since you have never been to one.  No one, besides those whacked out leftist PETA losers including yourself, wants this sport to become a non-checking touch hockey league.  Keep your extreme views out of hockey. 

Bettman keep your hands off of hockey.  Please retire before you destroy what is left of hockey.



Since: Jan 1, 2011
Posted on: April 17, 2011 12:17 am
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

Although, now you have to win 16 games so it makes even less sense in 2011. oh, but they have been doing it since '52, better not tread on tradition...
Dude thats the whole point of a tradition, most of them are pointless but the point is they are there because they matter to the players and fans most of all.

They pulled the octopi out of the ocean, allowed them to suffocate, then threw them on the ice ultimately to be tossed in the garbage because you had to win 8 games to win the cup.
Have you ever had octopi its delicious



Since: Oct 7, 2006
Posted on: April 16, 2011 11:20 pm
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

OOOHHH, I get it now. They pulled the octopi out of the ocean, allowed them to suffocate, then threw them on the ice ultimately to be tossed in the garbage because you had to win 8 games to win the cup. Forgive me, the historic significance of this gesture was completely lost to me, it is very clear now. Although, now you have to win 16 games so it makes even less sense in 2011. oh, but they have been doing it since '52, better not tread on tradition...



Since: Jan 1, 2011
Posted on: April 16, 2011 8:55 pm
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

What is the tradition, is there a story here about the tradition? Octopi-Detroit-Hockey-1952, I don't get the connection? Can someone tie these together?
If there is a story I would like to here it.
Back in the day in order to win the stanley cup you needed to win 8 games(2 best of 7 series), and an octopus has 8 arms. Two brothers threw an octopus on the ice during a Red Wings vs Toronto game, Detroit went on to win the series and the next 2 of 3 championships, a tradition was born.



Since: Apr 16, 2011
Posted on: April 16, 2011 8:55 pm
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

Pretty simple

Back in the 1950's, there were only 2 rounds.  Rather than needing to win 16 playoff games under the current format, you only had to win 8. 

Hence:  8 Wins -->  Octopus has 8 legs.

During the Redwings long Stanley Cup drought, fans started throwing Octopi on to the ice in memory of and anticipation of their previous and hopefully forthcoming Stanley Cup victory.




Since: Dec 1, 2008
Posted on: April 16, 2011 7:45 pm
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

What is the tradition, is there a story here about the tradition? Octopi-Detroit-Hockey-1952, I don't get the connection? Can someone tie these together?
If there is a story I would like to here it.



Since: Dec 23, 2007
Posted on: April 16, 2011 7:42 pm
 

NHL behind push to eject, fine octopi tossers?

another great American tradition down the tubes...


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