Blog Entry

Pucks & Numbers: Blackhawks' D and goaltending

Posted on: January 31, 2012 4:28 pm
Edited on: January 31, 2012 4:30 pm
Does Chicago need a backup goalie upgrade? (Getty Images)

Pucks and Numbers: a weekly statistical look at what's happening around the NHL. This week: A look at how the NHL's have top scorers have been used this season.

By: Adam Gretz

As the Chicago Blackhawks prepare to enter the second half of the regular season they find themselves in the bottom-third of the league when it comes to preventing goals.

Entering Tuesday's game in Vancouver, a rematch of last year's Western Conference Quarterfinal series, which the Canucks won in seven games, the Blackhawks are giving up just a little over 2.8 goals per game, which puts them 20th in the NHL. The only teams that are currently occupying a playoff spot that are surrendering more goals on a nightly basis are the Philadelphia Flyers (2.90) and Ottawa Senators (3.04).

So what is the biggest problem at this point? The goaltending of Corey Crawford and Ray Emery, or the defense in front of them?

Actually, it's probably a little bit of both.

When the the Blackhawks won the Stanley Cup two years ago it was easy to point to what their biggest weakness was -- goaltending.

It was supposed to be the position that held them back on their playoff run, and there was even a bit of concern (a lot, actually) when the trade deadline passed and the team was prepared to go into the postseason with a duo of then-rookie Antti Niemi and veteran Cristobal Huet. It raised a few eyebrows, resulted in a lot of questions, and then they went on and won the ultimate prize, ending a lengthy championship drought for the franchise.

Niemi was definitely solid in net, and he made some big saves for them in the playoffs, but he wasn't exactly Tim Thomas or Dominik Hasek back there, either.

Statistically, the Blackhawks finished the regular season, as a team, near the bottom of the NHL in most of the key goaltending areas. Their overall save percentage of .901 was 23rd in the league. Their 5-on-5 save percentage of .902 was 29th, ahead of only the Ottawa Senators.

Through their first 50 games this season the Blackhawks new goaltending duo is playing at a slightly higher level, especially when it comes to even strength play. At 5-on-5 the pairing of Crawford and emery is 22nd in the NHL with a .911 mark, and at a comparable .901 mark (23rd) overall. But they're giving up nearly a half-goal more per game.

How is that possible? The team in front of the goalies isn't anywhere near as good at limiting the goaltendes workload.

The Stanley Cup team in '09-10 had ridiculous depth at forward and defense and consistently steamrolled over their opponents, controlling the puck better than any team in the league. They limited their opponents to just 25 shots per game and out-shot them by an average of nine shots per game, the third-best mark of any team over the past 10 years. A team that controls the puck like that is capable of overcoming what might be a weakness in goal.

While they're still a really strong possession team this year, they're simply not an all-time great one like the Cup team was, due in large part to the decreased depth, especially on the blue line. (Just as a quick example: Even though he has a contract that was the butt of many jokes, Brian Campbell, now a member of the Florida Panthers, was a really, really good player for the Blackhawks. And while they needed to find a taker for his contract, they do miss his play on the blue line). That decreased depth puts the below-average goaltending (and let's face it, that's what it's been for a couple of years now in Chicago) under an even larger microscope.

I'm not sure Chicago can find an upgrade over Crawford on the trade market leading up to the deadline, and even though his play has regressed a bit from last season, he can probably play a little better over the second half of the season. Their best bet leading up to the deadline would be to focus on adding some depth to their blue line, or at the very least, looking to find an upgrade over Emery to help take some of the pressure off of their second-year starter.

For more hockey news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnHockey and @agretz on Twitter.

Since: Jan 31, 2012
Posted on: February 1, 2012 2:19 am

Pucks & Numbers: Blackhawks' D and goaltending

i hope see a .come man @@@  let's go

Since: Mar 20, 2011
Posted on: January 31, 2012 8:24 pm

Pucks & Numbers: Blackhawks' D and goaltending

The key in NHL playoffs, keeping the other team from scoring. Hawks have problems with that.

Since: Jul 1, 2010
Posted on: January 31, 2012 5:57 pm

Pucks & Numbers: Blackhawks' D and goaltending

Crawford has looked bad, but no where close to as erratic as Huet and Niemi were.   Neither goalie could keep the starting job for 4 straight starts.    Chicago's bigger problem is team defense.   Montador is a poor defender and he lacks the speed to cover up some of the mistakes.   O'Donnell is slow too.  Largely unnoticed is how bad the forwards have been defensively.   Forwards have consistently made poor decisions with the puck and in their coverage, it's lead to odd-man breaks and the perception that the d-men and goalie are a bigger problem than they have been.   

Defense has struggled, and the goaltending has too, but I think the goaltenders have been in a disproportionate number of nasty situattions because of the players in front of the them compared to the last 3 years.   Don't forget how bad the Hawks pk is.   They are among the worst.   34 ppga is significantly above the pk a couple years ago.    Many of the serious mistakes by the Hawks are relatively easy to correct.   The PK will be the biggest challenge.   

The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or