Blog Entry

Making sense of a non-sensical Orioles trade

Posted on: February 7, 2012 12:29 pm
Edited on: February 7, 2012 2:10 pm
 

There's been a lot of wonderment about why the Orioles would trade their perennial Opening Day starter, Jeremy Guthrie, for two lesser veteran pitchers who together make more money. It is perplexing, no question about that.

But here's my guess as to what caused them to do this seemingly nonsensical move ...

The Orioles just didin't love Guthrie.

It is, of course, possible that they just messed up and made a dumb deal. They've done it before. But in this case, I don't think so. I just don't think they had any great desire to have Guthrie lead their staff again.

Guthrie seems like a pleasant fellow, and he certainly is a smart guy (Stanford man). But there were whispers that the Orioles saw him as being slightly satisfied (one Orioles person remarked to me last spring that you could never tell from the way he carried himself that he only had 38 career victories) and perhaps not as tough a fellow as they'd like for their staff ace, either. Perhaps that is why they were so intent on trading him. And considering the take (Jason Hammel and Matt Lindstrom), I have to assume they were pretty intent.

Orioles GM Dan Duquette went on the airwaves Monday and said the Rockies' package was "by far'' the best offer they had for Guthrie. And I believe that. Even taking less than the midpoint to go to contender nor far from where he lives in Utah, as Guthrie did in going to Colorado, $8.2 million is still a big salary for someone with now 47 career victories.

Duquette pointed out that they could keep Hammel and Lindstrom for two years, not one, as if this was a big selling point. But I think Orioles people just felt it was time to move on. And if they thought that was the case, it probably was.


Comments

Since: Jun 24, 2008
Posted on: February 7, 2012 1:10 pm
 

Making sense of a nonsencial Orioles trade

It was "nonsencial" all right.


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