Blog Entry

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

Posted on: April 21, 2008 11:29 am
 

I have a confession to make.  A little over 18 months ago I weighed 200 pounds.  Medically speaking I was obese and because of it had faced some major health issues.  I had borderline high blood pressure, was experiencing sleep apnea, was out of breath more often then not and was facing Type 2 diabetes, but hey, my cholestoral was fine.  At the age of 45 and after carrying that weight on me for 18 years, I knew that I had to do something about it.  And I did.  The avatar that you see of me now, as you read this blog, was me before I decided to do something about the weight.  Now, 18 months later, I've lost approximately 50 pounds. 

As I enter my final stretch to lose my last 25 pounds, I'm going to have company in my diet.  They're kind of resigned that they're going to have to do this.  They're resigned that they'll have to get away from the computer, the tv and their game stations for at least 30 minutes a day to go walking with me.  Yes, my family is going to have to suffer with me this summer.  While I was losing weight, my family seemed to have gained weight.  My daughter fell victim to the "freshman 10" and my husband faces one of the side effects of his medications, which is weight gain. 

It's no secret that America's biggest health issue at the moment is the rise in the rate of obesity in America and the weight related health issues that arise from it, to include the increase of Type II diabetes.  It's not just a problem with adults, but also in children.  As the winter starts to give way to spring, around the country various programs have started surfacing in order to address this issue.  Public service announcements have popped up, using well known athletes to encourage kids to get outside and play.  The American Heart Association has also developed a PSA addressing adults exercising an hour a day, which adds years onto an individuals life. 

Over the past few decades, America has evolved into a seditary society and have passed along our bad habits to our children.  Not only in our nutritional habits but in our daily activities.  We've allowed our children to swap their bicycles for the game stations, we've swapped the playgrounds for the tv.  We've supersized our meals up, instead of watching our portions.  We've allowed ourselves to believe that we're spoiling our kids or giving them a treat when we take them to McDonalds or Wendy's.   And we've also provided the wrong example for our kids when they see us sitting in front of the computer or tv all evening. 

If we allow ourselves to continue, then we're only doing ourselves an injustice.  For our own sake and for the sake of our children, maybe it's time for us to step away for an hour a day. 

 

Category: General
Comments

Since: Oct 11, 2007
Posted on: April 21, 2008 6:19 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

i'm kinda lazy but i forced myself to do track for a 2nd year in a row. maybe i'll do cross-country next year so much more running than track though.



Since: Sep 9, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 5:51 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

Sunnysidez,

My husband and daughter both have their own PSP 2 and XBox...we're drawing the line before buying another console.  But I know about the late night fun...I usually wake up to him playing his game (right now he figured out how to get the old version of a pc game to run on XP).  I swear, if those things were taken away from them, I'mlikely to see a case of withdrawal worse then any drug or alcohol dts would be.




Since: Dec 31, 2007
Posted on: April 21, 2008 4:44 pm
 

Step Away from the XBox

NEVER!

I heart my 360 and it hearts me back dang it.

But nothing says commonsense like doing daily physical activity and eating right!

However COD4 is where I gets my late night fun fix in.




Since: Sep 9, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 2:27 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

Yep Clovdyx, it can.  Even just getting out at lunch and walking around the building a few times will help burn calories.  One really doesn't need a personal trainer (unless of course they need that continuous kick in the butt) to lose the weight. 

Of course, there's no way I'd survive being on the biggest loser or the National Body Challenge just because of the intensity of the workouts when you first begin.




Since: Nov 6, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 1:51 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

According to this list http://www.nutristrategy.com/activi

tylist4.htm you burn slightly less by shoveling snow than running, but I understand what you're saying.  Any movement and work can burn calories very well :)



Since: Sep 9, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 1:39 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

By that, I mean you should be eating four or five times a day. However, each should be a smaller meal of healthy stuff (not junk food or fast food) and they should be spaced out

I agree Clovdyx, I use to skip breakfast and lunch, so when I did eat, my metabolism had shut itself down and went into starvation mode, storing everything as fat. 

I'm not lucky enough to keep active at work, sitting behind a desk all day.  Funny though, as long as your active and burning calories, then it doesn't matter what type of "exercise" you do.  You actually burn more calories shoveling snow then you do running.  Same with mowing the lawn. 




Since: Sep 9, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 1:35 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

redawnt1,

The one great thing about exercise is that we can enjoy food without gaining too much weight.  I've found that as long as I exercise, I can have some potato chips, or some chocolate or that banana split every once in awhile, instead of denying myself. 

I think the big thing is, is also learning moderation. 




Since: Nov 6, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 1:27 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

The key to losing weight is to eat. A lot. By that, I mean you should be eating four or five times a day. However, each should be a smaller meal of healthy stuff (not junk food or fast food) and they should be spaced out.  That way, your metabolism keeps up at a higher rate and can burn the food off quicker than if you each two big meals.

Of course, exercise is important, too.  I got lucky and have a pretty good metabolism, so I don't have to work quite so hard, but I'm on my feet moving around all day at work so that provides some good exercise.  I keep meaning to start running, but my 4 - 11:30 shifts usually make me want to come home and crash. :(

Congratulations on losing the weight so far, Mom, and I hope the rest of it goes well for you. :D



Since: Dec 18, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 1:17 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

Great post Mom. I definitely agree with you, especially when it involves the kids. It's important for the kids to get exercise, eat healthy, etc. I on the other hand seem to be addicted to the TV, especially during football season, and God knows I love to eat, but walking 3 to 4 times a week helps me a lot. Congratulations on the weight you have already lost.




Since: Sep 9, 2006
Posted on: April 21, 2008 12:15 pm
 

Step Away from the Computer...the TV...the XBox

Jelly Donut,

Golfing (from what I understand) can be good exercise and I commend you for not taking the cart.  It's our biggest curse,  our metabolism, and it just gets worse when we get older. 

As far as the after pic....ummm...no...that's okay, Lyman doesn't need to touch that up.  Actually, the one that I use occassionally is me at 170 lbs.  When I get down to 125, maybe I'll post my 150 lb pic...lol. 

Great that your son got the nerve up to ask both girls out...lol.  The proms are so non-traditional these days aren't they?  My daughter and her friends went to the prom...rather then took a date...she had a blast.  (Kind of wish we had that when I went to high school, maybe I would have had more fun at my Christmas formal).



The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com