Blog Entry

Motivation

Posted on: February 12, 2008 1:08 pm
 

Some of you may already know but I coach girls volleyball and have for many years.  Every year I run into the same problem.  Everyone is motivated by different things, so how do I motivate them as a team? I am sure there are several other coaches out there- what works for you? 

My team has finally figured out how to play to their potential no matter the opponents skill level.  Every coach knows the 'play your game' mantra.  Now the challenge is to motivate them to improve on what they can already do.  Even the pro's are constantly refining theri skills, so why don't the girls understand that you have to continually work at improving.  It seems like I have much more belief in them than they do.  I wish they could see what I see.

This is a problem much larger than sports though.  Take a walk through any high school these days, eyes are just glazed over hoping to make it through the day.  Where are the goals?  Where is the drive to make it on thier own?  I am still amazed at how much 'stuff' teenagers have; video games, wardrobe to die for, mp3 players, tv's in their room, ect.  Where does all this stuff come from and how much do they actually have to work for it?  My town is overrun by kids just out of school who have no idea what it takes to live on their own.  A job flipping burgers doesn't pay enough to cover rent let alone anything extra.  yet they get a $300 paycheck and promptly spend $50 on DVDs or video games or cigarettes.

What motivates you and how do you motivate others around you?

Category: General
Comments

Since: May 28, 2008
Posted on: July 30, 2008 2:25 pm
 

Motivation in Volleyball

I also coach a girls varsity team and I believe that kids these days are so programmed that they don't know how to manage time properly.  They are stretched in 20 different directions.  School play, sports, honor society, some have jobs, no problem taking vacations during season, school clubs, etc.  They don't know how to say no and want to make everyone happy.  Those who succeed at the multi-tasking are the motivated ones.  The ones that are in a fog 90% of the time are struggling with what they have on the plate.  I keep my office door open for them year round.  I bust my butt to get them to stay in shape, work on the game, and learn to love the game.  Not make it a chore.  Kids will do what makes them the most happy.  I am bit of an old school guy, but this approach has been working.  I used to demand more, but get less.  Now I demand less and get more.  Kids don't really like demands placed on them like we did in the 70's.  We didn't know any better.  I have been turning out college players year after year without a local volleyball club for my kids to play on.  They play the game because they love it.  I hope I have something to do with it. 



Since: Jan 12, 2007
Posted on: February 16, 2008 5:04 am
 

Motivation

It has been a very long time since I coached (Soccer back in England) but I have to say to me today kids are so overcoached that the fun of the game and competing seems to be taken away.  The point of sports in my opinion at high school level is to compete, have fun, learn to respect your opponent and understand the meaning of the word team.  A forgotten art is to teach kids how to take defeat in their stride, the world is not about winning all the time, life just is not that kind.

I don't see a whole lot of fun for kids these days. I think too many coaches are obsessed with winning and get very one tracked in the way they coach. When I coached I tried to take some time to play games that were related to the overall game but developed skills whilst having fun ( most times without them even realizing it!) The challenge I feel is to constantly reinvent the game, show kids facets of the game they have not seen.  I cannot speak to Volleyball because I have never played the game and to be honest know very little about it but I bet there are a number of different games within the game that can be designed to take away from constantly doing the same thing.

It is the coaches that strive to be different and those who show kids what is possible with teamwork and discipline who will be remembered 10 and 20 years down the road, some of the skills and life lessons learnt playing sports are with us forever,




Since: Aug 16, 2007
Posted on: February 13, 2008 6:14 pm
 

Motivation

I think another scary dynamic we will have to deal with in the near future are the complete lack of social skills that children and young adults have.  They were raised on the internet, instant messaging (OMG), cel phones, and so on.  A story told by a coworker that really made me think was that her daughter sat inside on the computer on a beautiful day and IM'd her best friend all day.  Not exactly bad right?  They live directly across the street from each other!!  In fact my coworker had to make her daughter go outside and visit her friend face to face.  As I have told this to other folks with teens I am shocked to hear them say they have had to do the same things to their kids. 

What does it eventually mean to them?  Will they be able to go into public and speak with confidence? I doubt it.  Some of the on campus interviews I have conducted in the last 4-5 years have resulted in some amazing situations where the kid was really smart (3.9 Engineering) but could not hold a converstation at all.  Are we raising a bunch of loners?  Are they content to sit around in their underwear "talking" to people on an electronic box.  Will they begin to embellish reality?  I know, I just did the same thing.  But the difference is I do everything else.  I am socially outgoing.  I am extremely active in a healthy lifestyle.  And I know how to talk with people with confidence.

My 2.7 cents (inflation).

AV out.




Since: Dec 1, 2007
Posted on: February 13, 2008 5:58 pm
 

Motivation

Great blog and great topic.  It's so true how kids today don't know the value of earning a dollar, and that's not preparing them for the real world. 

I don't coach a volleyball team, but I do have employees that work for me, and I consider them a team.  What you said, Red, is very true.  Everyone's motivated by different things.  What I've found is by learning about each individual employee and what motivates them, you are coaching them as a team.  That's how it winds up working out.  I also make sure each employee I have understands and appreciates each other's job period, but also in relation to how it affects them and their job.  I try and show everyone the big picture.  When any of them have a disagreement, I put them in each other's shoes, so they see the other side of it.  I basically make them think about each other.  I've found these things to be effective motivators in creating a teamlike atmosphere amongst my staff. 



IrishSean2
Since: Dec 13, 2006
Posted on: February 12, 2008 10:22 pm
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Deion3318
Since: Nov 19, 2006
Posted on: February 12, 2008 8:33 pm
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Since: Feb 19, 2007
Posted on: February 12, 2008 4:50 pm
 

Motivation

Take a walk through any high school these days, eyes are just glazed over hoping to make it through the day.

Take a walk around town and notice how many adults have that same look on their faces about their job...  I don't know what happened, but it seems the adults I knew back in the day all loved their jobs a lot more than most the folks do now.  Almost any industry and employess has become so cutthroat, there is no loyalty.  People moving jobs, companies downsizing, so many worries that work is only owrk for so many people.

How do I motivate myself?  It's all about pride.  I don't fail.  I want to be the best I can for myself.  I want to be the best husband/father I can.  I'm not going to lie, incentives or whatever are nice - but there's nothing worse than knowing I screwed up and nothing better than knowing "I did that."

How do I motivate others?  That's a toughy, you either got it or ya don't.  I was once told in the military "You were born with more leadership ability than I'll ever be able to learn."  I never put yourself too high above anyone I never ask anyone to do anything I would not do or have done, and people know that...  I'm always quicker to offer help than to ask for it.  When vocalizing things (my pride is internal) it is always "We did this great thing."  When I'm in charge of a group and the opposite happens it's "I messed up."  Always remember people are people not things.  Always show respect to everyone (Momma's lesson number 1 "treat others the way you want to be treated" is a gold standard in my life that I am beginning to think isn't taught anymore).  Know that any situation can be a learning opportunity.

I know that's not what you're looking for.  When I coached defensive line, I guess my biggest motivators were the fact that I would never, ever be hard on physical errors - if you're trying to make something happen a can't punish that - AND (they probably though this was the biggest) when I was trying to teach technique I would allow the players to hit me (got a real jacked up lip over that one once)...  If a guy in a t shirt can do it, so can you (not to mention it fosters bonding).

Still, don't think I'm helping for volleyball, but I'm a little bored and wandering...




Since: Jun 4, 2007
Posted on: February 12, 2008 3:11 pm
 

Motivation

Take a walk through any high school these days, eyes are just glazed over hoping to make it through the day.  Where are the goals?  Where is the drive to make it on thier own?  I am still amazed at how much 'stuff' teenagers have; video games, wardrobe to die for, mp3 players, tv's in their room, ect.  Where does all this stuff come from and how much do they actually have to work for it?  My town is overrun by kids just out of school who have no idea what it takes to live on their own.  A job flipping burgers doesn't pay enough to cover rent let alone anything extra.  yet they get a $300 paycheck and promptly spend $50 on DVDs or video games or cigarettes.
yep, I used to be guilty of a lot of those things, but I think most teenagers just want to have fun and enjoy life while their young.  I would think most high schoolers know that in the future, they will have to make money and use it wisely..., but teenagers don't want to think about or deal with that stuff.  That's just how kids are....    

I think once they grow to a certain level of maturity, they'll start motivating themselves and learn the value of a dollar...


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