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Blog Entry

The NCAA is so hypocritical

Posted on: August 20, 2009 8:55 am
 
So the NCAA is about to vacate Memphis' Final Four from 2008, presumably because -- while he was in high school -- 2008 Memphis star Derrick Rose used a fraudulent test score to get into college in the first place.

Fine.

But what about the program that made it to a Final Four with a player who, the NCAA later found out, had accepted more than $2,000 from his AAU coach while still in high school? That player also should have been ineligible. That school also should have vacated the Final Four.

But that player was Corey Maggette. And that team was Duke. The year was 1999.

So nothing happened. To anyone. To this day. Nothing has happened, and it never will.

My point? My point is that the NCAA, even with as much progress as it has made under Myles Brand, still uses selective justice when crashing down onto various schools or coaches. Then-Memphis coach John Calipari is on the NCAA's hit list, and so the NCAA ostensibly holds him responsible for Marcus Camby's dalliance with an agent in 1995, and for whatever Derrick Rose did while he was in high school hundreds of miles away in Chicago.

But Mike Krzyzewski is not on the NCAA's hit list, so Maggette is fine, Duke is fine, 1999 is fine, the world is a happy place full of seashells and balloons.

Forgive me if I vomit up a conch.

I said conch.
Category: NCAAB
Comments

Since: Jul 8, 2009
Posted on: August 21, 2009 5:20 pm
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

This is so awesome, an articulate article, with valid points of argument that question other elite coaches and their less than reputable recruiting issues...................and this message board is silent.  Where are all the Duke Fans? Memphis Fans? Kansas or North Carolina Fans? All of them have diharreah of the mouth on Gary Parrishes articles, but seem to have either missed Doyells blog or surprisingly dont have any outrage toward these events!!!

Way to go Doyel, I wish you could take over writing for CBSsports and Gary Parrish would get canned for being a tool!



Since: Aug 20, 2009
Posted on: August 21, 2009 1:14 pm
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

"Sorry, but you are the one being careless in your analysis.  Memphis was not informed of any potential problems with Rose's test score until April 2008...after the championship game.  Their analysis of the test score came during that summer, once Rose was already drafted and in the NBA.  It's a damn shame you put so much thought and effort into a mini-thesis and were wrong on the basic premise you have constructed your whole arguement around."


That was the NCAA investigation and ETS inquiry you're referring to.  Memphis conducted and concluded its own investigation in November 2007, citing that they could find no evidence substantiating the allegation.  Memphis knew about the allegation the entire season; not just after the April championship game. 

What people seem to be missing is that the truth of whether or not Rose even cheated isn't at issue here as far as the NCAA is concerned...and it hasn't really even been proven, even though folks are taking it that way.  What's at work here is that the ETS has zeroed out his score, rendering him academically ineligible.  The ETS feels the test score is a fraud, but the NCAA isn't taking a position on that.  Rose still claims he's innocent.  Memphis still says it can't know if he's innocent or not.  That particular matter isn't settled, accept on messageboards, of course.  In fact, what the ETS ruling seems to have been largely hinging on what the fact that Rose never responded to a pair of letters from the ETS about the allegation, and so, lacking that response, the ETS went and nullified the test, and the NCAA dominoes fell from there.

But don't pretend that Memphis was clueless about all this up until after the season ended.  You don't conduct an investigation if you're not aware of the allegation. 

Duke, on the other hand, never conducted an investigation because there was no allegation until Maggette was long gone.  They never had to confront the matter of whether or not to suspend Maggette as Memphis did with Rose.


Another difference is that Rose's ineligibility was academic in nature.  Maggette's ineligibility was related to amateur status.  Amateur status eligibility can be restored after suspensions and other penalties are satisfied.  I don't know if that's true in the case of a student-athlete not being academically eligible from the start.  How do you rectify an ineligible status if a qualifying test score is nullified.  Suspension penalties don't really work the same way to restore that kind of ineligibility.

The two situations are fundamentally different. 



Since: Aug 20, 2009
Posted on: August 21, 2009 12:57 pm
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

"You're talking about some warning Memphis got before they enrolled"

No I'm not.  I'm talking about Memphis's knowledge of the allegation at the start of the season.



Since: Aug 19, 2006
Posted on: August 21, 2009 12:05 pm
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

The difference, Gregg, is that Memphis was alerted to the allegation of the player's potential ineligibility early on.  Duke (and everyone else) didn't learn of the Piggie allegation until later, after the player has left the program.

What the NCAA Infractions committee is penalizing is the institution's response, not the mere fact that games were played with a player who later was deemed to have been ineligible.  Ineligibility can be rectified (see UCLA's actions in JaRon Rush's case).  What Memphis did (which Duke was never in a position to have to do) was review the situation and determine that the allegation was not supported by the evidence and they cleared the player to play.  The NCAA is penalizing Memphis for this choice, not because the player wound up being ineligible.  The NCAA obviously feels that Memphis should have suspended the player while it conducted a more diligent investigation, erring on the side of caution.  Memphis obviously disagrees, which is why they are appealing; but what the NCAA doesn't want is member institutions to err on the side that most benefits the program's season, which they apparently feel that Memphis did.

Duke was never in this position with Maggette, and hence that is the reason why its apparent leniency, once Maggette's eligibility was found to have been compromised, is not inconsistent with the harshness of the penalty being imposed on Memphis.  Had Duke known about rumors of the situation with Maggette and Piggie and THEN chosen to let Maggette play while awaiting further determination or evidence to come to light, then the situations would be similar and you could be charging the NCAA with favoritism or cronyism. 

You're being careless in your analysis, making your blog little more than a partisan messageboard-like polemic that is exposing a bias rather than reasoned commentary.
Sorry, but you are the one being careless in your analysis.  Memphis was not informed of any potential problems with Rose's test score until April 2008...after the championship game.  Their analysis of the test score came during that summer, once Rose was already drafted and in the NBA.  It's a damn shame you put so much thought and effort into a mini-thesis and were wrong on the basic premise you have constructed your whole arguement around.

The only difference between the Rose situation and the Maggette situation is that Maggette's eleigibility is proven to have been compromised...the NCAA just thinks that Rose didn't take his test, but has no proof that I've seen.  Even their handwriting expert could not conclusively say it wasn't his writing.

Oh there is one other difference.  Maggette played for Duke and Rose played for Memphis.



Since: Aug 22, 2006
Posted on: August 21, 2009 9:17 am
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

I completely agree with this... I just don't understand how it is the school's fault that they didn't know Rose faked his SAT.  As far as I know, the NCAA cleared Rose as an "eligible" player.  Did they not do a review of his SAT score?  Once the NCAA clears him, what is Memphis supposed to do?  If I was a coach, I would assume that if the NCAA cleared his SAT score, then everything in order.  Is the NCAA going to punish itself for clearing him to play at the time?
And secondly, what triggered the NCAA to investigate his SAT score now?  Why not after he first took it?
The NCAA had no problem at all taking in all the ticket money and publicity while Rose was playing, only to investigate this one-and-done player after he has graduated.  And the worst part about this is that they are punishing people who had nothing to do with this whole situation.
These NCAA officials stink to high heaven.



Since: Aug 8, 2008
Posted on: August 21, 2009 8:56 am
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

I'd be a bit more outraged about the Magette thing if Duke had actually done something wrong.  Sheesh, Doyel, maybe Coach K will help you write that book you'll eventually get around to:  "How to Hold a Grudge".



Since: Jan 28, 2008
Posted on: August 21, 2009 12:13 am
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

JojoCircusBoy,Do you have evidence that the rest of us don't have.  You're talking about some warning Memphis got before they enrolled Rose: "The difference, Gregg, is that Memphis was alerted to the allegation of the player's potential ineligibility early on."  
I have read a TON (too much) about this whole situation, and no one else (posters, national writers, the NCAA) have mentioned this early warning Memphis got.  So, basically my questions is: "What the heck are you talking about?"
If Memphis had been warned AT ALL about Rose then I wouldn't feel sorry for them, but the facts are that the NCAA didn't warn the university until AFTER the season.  They sent 1 letter to Rose's family during the tourney (I believe), and of course his family didn't make that news public.  If there really was an early warning for Memphis then someone please link it so we can all stop worrying about this.  Unfortunately I don't think it exists, and the NCAA still looks ridiculous.



Since: Apr 20, 2009
Posted on: August 21, 2009 12:11 am
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

Doyel is absolutely right on this one.
This is about punishing a mid-major 'upstart' program and protecting the BCS big boys. Does anybody think that Calipari would have walked away unscathed if he hadn't left for Kentucky?.......Gimme' a break!  He's a big time Kentucky coach now. They have a special relationship that the non-BSC schools don't have. Just ask Utah how that works.

That being said, Greg, you need to start looking over your shoulder more, and if you see any black helicopters, RUN , because the NCAA will be coming for you next.

At least now you have a ton of Memphis fans that will stick up for you. Hope you like writing in unlit basements.

Oh, and 5'd and fav'd, for what it's worth.Cool






Since: Aug 22, 2006
Posted on: August 20, 2009 11:01 pm
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

poop trumpet your id and your comment go hand in hand.
your a moron.



Since: Mar 23, 2008
Posted on: August 20, 2009 10:33 pm
 

The NCAA is so hypocritical

The text of the NCAA's report does not reference Memphis' reaction.  It reference's Derrick Rose's non-response.  That is all.  The ETS ruled Rose ineligible (after the fact), so Memphis played with an ineligible player, therefore, they must forfeit the entire season, that is that.  It would not have mattered if Memphis was on notice or not, at least according to the way the report is written. 

Read the report.  Frankly, it's ridiculous.  Nothing will convince me that if the same had happened to UNC or Kansas that the result would be similar.  Memphis will appeal, they will lose, I hope Memphis sues the NCAA after that. 

The second inquiry letter was sent to Derrick Rose 3 days ... let me say that again ... 3 days ... AFTER the National Championship game was over.  The whole thing is outrageous and anyone with half a brain who looks at it rationally could conclude otherwise.



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