Blog Entry

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

Posted on: January 23, 2011 6:10 pm
Edited on: January 23, 2011 6:53 pm
 
Carson Palmer was part of the problem, and now he wants out. Terrific. So in addition to his reconstructed knee, obvious arm issues and passive form of leadership, we can add quitter to his list of issues.

Contrary to what many think, Palmer was never an innocent victim of Bengal-dom. He was part of the problem, the one player with enough clout -- right position, right salary, right reputation -- to reign in the malcontents in his own huddle. Me-first receivers like T.J. Houshmandzadeh and Chad Johnson, and then Chad Ochocinco and Terrell Owens, ran roughshod in that locker room because, in part, Palmer let them.

Yes, sure, coach Marvin Lewis let them, too. Lewis is a weak, weak head coach. Maybe he would be a good coach, with the right chemistry, but with Mike Brown turning the Bengals into the Island of Misfit Toys, Lewis was the wrong coach. Cincinnati needed a bad cop. Instead it got that chuckling softy, Marvin Lewis.

But it also got Carson Palmer, exerting none of his influence, diminishing his own power to the point that he was the team's most expensive player, most important player, maybe even its most talented player -- but he was just another guy in that locker room. No more influential than anyone else.

Palmer was so mentally weak that, as his injuries mounted and his numbers started to decline, the Bengals brought in the most harmless backup quarterback in the history of the NFL -- the starter's little brother. With Jordan Palmer as the No. 2, there was never a question who would be No. 1. Carson never had to worry. Never had to compete.

His production kept sliding. His impact in the locker room kept receding. He never said a harsh word about the idiots around him, his silence setting free Ochocinco and Houshmandzadeh and Owens.

Now he wants out? Really? Palmer doesn't deserve a fresh start. He helped steer this team into the iceberg, so he can go down with the ship. Or he can do the most Carson Palmer-like maneuver imaginable and quit.








Category: NFL
Tags: Bengals
 
Comments

Since: Feb 9, 2011
Posted on: February 9, 2011 4:20 pm
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

Carson has suffered enough. The Bungles should let him go. He is not to blame for the circus in Cinnci and neither is Marvin Lewis. Mike Brown is the problem, always has been, always will be. Palmer and Lewis are normal, sane people trying their best to operate in an insane dysfunctional environment. The only worse places are Washington and Oakland.




Since: May 29, 2009
Posted on: January 24, 2011 5:42 pm
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

This is a very reckless article.  Poorly written and without merit.  The issue here is that Doyel has no insight into Palmer's relationship with the organization, or any of his reasons for wanting to leave (that Doyel explains or provides factual accounts of).  Doyel is simplying trying to garner attention on the Palmer topic.  Poor execution on his part.
As a long time Bengals fan I will come to Doyels defense on this and tell you that he is spot on with the article.



Since: May 31, 2007
Posted on: January 24, 2011 2:24 pm
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

"I believe the NFL does have the rule that if you rejoin the league that you are still under the existing contract that you were bound to when you retired.  That is why Barry Sanders never rejoined.  Detroit wouldn't release him from that."

That's also why Favre tried to get both the Packers (unsuccessfully) and the Jets (successfully) to release him... he couldn't just retire and unretire to get to the Vikings where he wanted to be.  If you retire, the clock runs on your contract as if you were still playing.  So for example, if you have 4 years left on the deal when you retire, you'd still be under contract if you came back out of retirement any time within those 4 years.  Sanders tried to come back after 1 year of retirement and join the Dolphins, but was informed that he'd still be with Detroit.  And the Lions stuck to their guns rather than trade him, so he decided to stay retired.



Since: Sep 23, 2009
Posted on: January 24, 2011 1:46 pm
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

This is a very reckless article.  Poorly written and without merit.  The issue here is that Doyel has no insight into Palmer's relationship with the organization, or any of his reasons for wanting to leave (that Doyel explains or provides factual accounts of).  Doyel is simplying trying to garner attention on the Palmer topic.  Poor execution on his part.



Since: Nov 11, 2008
Posted on: January 24, 2011 12:57 pm
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

So it's Carson's fault for the antics of the T.Ocho show? It's Carson's fault that the others morons in that locker room don't act as professional as he does and he doesn't chastise them for it publicly? Do you know that he doesn't do this privately?
It's Carson's fault that this damn franchise is so cheap and short-sighted that they didn't bring in a capable backup to come in and throw the ball to receivers who quit on the ball and run crappy routes?
It's more of this type of non-accountability that we need in sports and in general. Look to blame someone else when the lowest common denominator on the team acts up...How dare we expect others to act professional! That's like blaming Gary Parrish for your behavior, Doyel. Well thought out.




Since: Feb 7, 2009
Posted on: January 24, 2011 12:19 pm
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

I believe the NFL does have the rule that if you rejoin the league that you are still under the existing contract that you were bound to when you retired.  That is why Barry Sanders never rejoined.  Detroit wouldn't release him from that.



Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: January 24, 2011 11:45 am
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

Well the Bengals also have a Top 5 pick in the draft, so it's not like they can get much worse without him.



Since: Dec 22, 2008
Posted on: January 24, 2011 11:05 am
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

I don't know if I can honestly blame Palmer or not. The Bungal org. is a joke and thats putting it kindly. They go out of their way to sign every freakin criminal thats just released from jail, they keep bringing back a coach that in no way, shape, or form deserves to have a head coaching job because he is such a wuss that its comical, and they have the worst excuse for an owner in professional sports. With all that against Palmer its kind of difficult to blame him for not wanting to keep putting up with that ****. I don't really think it is Palmers job to keep the village idiots under control and he just keeps seeing the org. bring in these morons for him to deal with. Maybe he just knows that anything he says or does is not going to do any good and when they brought back Lewis after another yr. of complete ineptitude it put him over the edge.



Since: Oct 4, 2009
Posted on: January 24, 2011 10:36 am
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

I agree 1000 % with this article.



Since: May 29, 2009
Posted on: January 24, 2011 9:30 am
 

Call Carson's bluff, Bengals. Let him quit

So he's not a outspoken, take-charge type. It's the man's personality. He has always been that way, even back when he was winning games at USC and Cincy early in his career.


So the franchise qb, who is not an outspoken, take charge type wants to DEMAND a trade or he will retire?  I find that to be a bit contradictory, dont you.

The issue I have with all of this is that Palmer is the key to the Bengals offense.  He was drafted to be the franchise qb and the leader of the offense, everything the offense does goes through him.  Therefore it is his responsibility to be that leader, to be outspoken, to demand respect and to take control of the offense.  However it seemed as if he very seldom did any of that.  In other words he is as much of the problem as anyone on the team. 

And now he wants to run away from it, wants to take the cowards way out?  Unfortunately, his skills aside, this might tell us all we need to know about Carson Palmer.


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