Blog Entry

Joe Torre is a Judas

Posted on: January 25, 2009 6:51 pm
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That's it. That's the bottom line.

Torre can now try to weasel out of the information he told author Tom Verducci but Torre's name is on the upcoming book and if the reports are true he stabbed his former organization in the back.

Two New York newspapers are quoting parts of the book and the information they're quoting is extremely damaging to the Yankees. Part of the book reportedly says that Alex Rodriguez was called "A-Fraud" by teammates and that Rodriguez had an obsession with Derek Jeter (not that there's anything wrong with that). Torre also supposedly rips Brian Cashman.

This is not Torre's finest moment and no amount of backtracking by Torre can change that.

What I fail to understand is Torre's motivation? What does Torre have to gain by writing these things? He can't need money. He's made tens of millions. He's one of the wealthiest managers in the history of the sport.

That leaves revenge.

Torre was good to the Yankees and the Yankees were good to Torre. I haven't seen any books from Cashman ripping Torre so why does Torre feel the need to rip his old employers.

This does not look good for Torre. He comes off as a petulant child still bitter about his Yankee breakup. He's injured his reputation as someone who was classy and stayed above it all.

Hope it was worth it, Joe.

 

 

 

 

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Category: MLB
Tags: Yankees
 
Comments

Since: May 6, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 10:58 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

What planet are you from you moron?  Torre was instrumental in the Yanks late 90's dynasty and they didn't even invite him to the final game ceremonies at Yankee stadium?  They were good to him yet they insulted him w/ the one year deal?  Yes the Yanks demand World Series but Joe didn't bat or pitch for the Yanks in the postseason in recent years.  He did a great job of keeping the egos in check.  I think Girardi is a great manager but he couldn't get them into the playoffs last year - Joe led the Dodgers to October baseball.  Think before you write up a half-ass article next time.  You jagov.




Since: Dec 2, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 7:53 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

Joe Torre is no longer in New York, but for now, and perhaps even when the Yankees open spring training in Tampa next month, he is a presence with the club as surely as he was during any of his 12 glorious seasons as Yankees manager.  The quotes and stories attributed to Torre in , the forthcoming book he co-authored with Sports Illustrated's about his tenure in the Bronx have lit anew the flames of discord that swirled around the team and the man as Torre’s Hall of Fame-worthy tenure wound to an unceremonious conclusion in October 2007.

The impact that this will have on the Yankees' season, and on Torre's, remains to be seen, but the impact on his legacy in New York is already being felt. For perhaps the first time, Teflon Torre is being viewed in an unfavorable light for exposing his true feelings about his relationship with Yankees general manager Brian Cashman and revealing how some of his players felt about superstar third baseman Alex Rodriguez.




Since: Dec 2, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 7:52 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

Joe Torre is no longer in New York, but for now, and perhaps even when the Yankees open spring training in Tampa next month, he is a presence with the club as surely as he was during any of his 12 glorious seasons as Yankees manager.  The quotes and stories attributed to Torre in , the forthcoming book he co-authored with Sports Illustrated's about his tenure in the Bronx have lit anew the flames of discord that swirled around the team and the man as Torre’s Hall of Fame-worthy tenure wound to an unceremonious conclusion in October 2007.

The impact that this will have on the Yankees' season, and on Torre's, remains to be seen, but the impact on his legacy in New York is already being felt. For perhaps the first time, Teflon Torre is being viewed in an unfavorable light for exposing his true feelings about his relationship with Yankees general manager Brian Cashman and revealing how some of his players felt about superstar third baseman Alex Rodriguez.

As juicy as those details may be to a salivating press and public, what Torre said in the book is less interesting than the fact that he said anything at all. If there was an off-the-field triumph to match his on-field success in New York, it was that he calmly navigated the choppy waters of the city, the owner, the media and the egos that have swallowed whole so many others in his position. His greatest managerial skill, it was often said, was either keeping a lid on potential controversies so they wouldn’t become public, or quickly defusing the ones that did before they could blow up his team’s chances at another championship.

Yet, in the end, even Torre was not immune from drama. After the 2007 season ended with the Yankees third-straight first-round playoff exit, Torre engaged in a very public showdown with the club over his future as manager. When he turned down a contract offer from the Yankees that he deemed “an insult” (the club asked him to take a pay cut in base salary that could be made up for with a series of incentives starting with if they made the playoffs) he managed to do so in such a way that left him with his dignity and reputation as a classy, above-the-fray leader intact.

In his first year away from the Bronx, he maintained that reputation, and even though his position in Yankees lore is chiseled in stone, this book may be the first sign that that stone is starting to crack.

What do you think? Should Torre have aired the Yankees dirty laundry, or was he better off keeping quiet? How will this impact his status as a Yankees legend? Wat do ya score that?




Since: Dec 2, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 7:50 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

Joe Torre is no longer in New York, but for now, and perhaps even when the Yankees open spring training in Tampa next month, he is a presence with the club as surely as he was during any of his 12 glorious seasons as Yankees manager.  The quotes and stories attributed to Torre in , the forthcoming book he co-authored with Sports Illustrated's about his tenure in the Bronx have lit anew the flames of discord that swirled around the team and the man as Torre’s Hall of Fame-worthy tenure wound to an unceremonious conclusion in October 2007.

The impact that this will have on the Yankees' season, and on Torre's, remains to be seen, but the impact on his legacy in New York is already being felt. For perhaps the first time, Teflon Torre is being viewed in an unfavorable light for exposing his true feelings about his relationship with Yankees general manager Brian Cashman and revealing how some of his players felt about superstar third baseman Alex Rodriguez.

As juicy as those details may be to a salivating press and public, what Torre said in the book is less interesting than the fact that he said anything at all. If there was an off-the-field triumph to match his on-field success in New York, it was that he calmly navigated the choppy waters of the city, the owner, the media and the egos that have swallowed whole so many others in his position. His greatest managerial skill, it was often said, was either keeping a lid on potential controversies so they wouldn’t become public, or quickly defusing the ones that did before they could blow up his team’s chances at another championship.

Yet, in the end, even Torre was not immune from drama. After the 2007 season ended with the Yankees third-straight first-round playoff exit, Torre engaged in a very public showdown with the club over his future as manager. When he turned down a contract offer from the Yankees that he deemed “an insult” (the club asked him to take a pay cut in base salary that could be made up for with a series of incentives starting with if they made the playoffs) he managed to do so in such a way that left him with his dignity and reputation as a classy, above-the-fray leader intact.

In his first year away from the Bronx, he maintained that reputation, and even though his position in Yankees lore is chiseled in stone, this book may be the first sign that that stone is starting to crack.

What do you think? Should Torre have aired the Yankees dirty laundry, or was he better off keeping quiet? How will this impact his status as a Yankees legend?




Since: Dec 2, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 7:49 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

Joe Torre is no longer in New York, but for now, and perhaps even when the Yankees open spring training in Tampa next month, he is a presence with the club as surely as he was during any of his 12 glorious seasons as Yankees manager.  The quotes and stories attributed to Torre in , the forthcoming book he co-authored with Sports Illustrated's about his tenure in the Bronx have lit anew the flames of discord that swirled around the team and the man as Torre’s Hall of Fame-worthy tenure wound to an unceremonious conclusion in October 2007.

The impact that this will have on the Yankees' season, and on Torre's, remains to be seen, but the impact on his legacy in New York is already being felt. For perhaps the first time, Teflon Torre is being viewed in an unfavorable light for exposing his true feelings about his relationship with Yankees general manager Brian Cashman and revealing how some of his players felt about superstar third baseman Alex Rodriguez.

As juicy as those details may be to a salivating press and public, what Torre said in the book is less interesting than the fact that he said anything at all. If there was an off-the-field triumph to match his on-field success in New York, it was that he calmly navigated the choppy waters of the city, the owner, the media and the egos that have swallowed whole so many others in his position. His greatest managerial skill, it was often said, was either keeping a lid on potential controversies so they wouldn’t become public, or quickly defusing the ones that did before they could blow up his team’s chances at another championship.

Yet, in the end, even Torre was not immune from drama. After the 2007 season ended with the Yankees third-straight first-round playoff exit, Torre engaged in a very public showdown with the club over his future as manager. When he turned down a contract offer from the Yankees that he deemed “an insult” (the club asked him to take a pay cut in base salary that could be made up for with a series of incentives starting with if they made the playoffs) he managed to do so in such a way that left him with his dignity and reputation as a classy, above-the-fray leader intact.

In his first year away from the Bronx, he maintained that reputation, and even though his position in Yankees lore is chiseled in stone, this book may be the first sign that that stone is starting to crack.

What do you think? Should Torre have aired the Yankees dirty laundry, or was he better off keeping quiet? How will this impact his status as a Yankees legend?




Since: Mar 9, 2007
Posted on: January 26, 2009 2:48 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

The Yankees betrayed Torre when they sent him an insulting contract offer that they knew he wouldn't take. I'm sure George didn't make any less money after the Yankees lost in the playoffs that year, so why should Torre. Is Torre sounding childish? Yes. Did Torre start this betryal thing? No way.Couldn't have said it better. Torre does sound childish, but the Yankees were indeed childish offering someone who just took there team to the playoffs 13 years in a row a 1 year deal.

Then look what happens his first year gone, THEY DON'T MAKE THE PLAYOFFS.




Since: Jan 30, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 2:32 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

YellWHY can't anybody say anything against the Yankees? havn't you heard about freedom of the press and of speech,yankees are bad for baseball they riun all small market teams and their families.and the players that go there say it isn't the money,BULL SHIT.CAN'T STAND THE YANKEES AND THE STATE AND CITY THET PLAY FOR. New york is the pits and so are the people who run it.and to beat it all i live in new york. (up-state) BYE!!!




Since: May 5, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 2:06 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

Motivation? Freeman, how can you not see Torre's motivation? This is a man that brought four world series wins and nothing but winning seasons and playoff appearences. Then the team had an injury plagued off-year which happened to be the year Torre and the Yankees were to re-up his deal. After all that that man had done for the Yankees, he was not offered a multi-year deal, he was offered a one year deal. Maybe you work on a yearly basis, Freeman, but what a one-year deal means in baseball is that they did not respect the man enough to give him discretion over the team for the next season. A one-year deal means they stand ready to fire him at the drop of a hat when the first sign of trouble comes. A one-year deal means that the Yankees were not as committed to Joe Torre as Joe Torre was committed to the Yankees. It was a slap in the face, and although I hated Torre for no other reason than that he was a Yankee, I applauded him turning down the deal and I hope he wins the worlds series for LA this year while the Yankees don't even make the playoffs. Joe got a raw deal from an organization that he brought back to prominence. He deserved better, and he knew it. There's motivation for you.




Since: Apr 27, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 1:58 pm
 

Joe Torre is a Judas

How can you feel sorry for the yankees after all the yankee's put torre through, especially during his last season in NY?  Torre has more class than every current yankee combined except for maybe jeter and rivera, so why write an article bashing him the second he does something that some people may not like...even though he's telling the truth about a club that has no values! What a moronic article, go back to journalism school Freeman and learn to write about something that really matters... 




Since: Jul 9, 2008
Posted on: January 26, 2009 1:46 pm
 

Joe Torre wasn't good, he was GREAT for the Yanks

With all the glamour and spotlights of New York Sportsteams and there whiny " win every game " personna's, Joe Torre was the only constant calming figure in New York sports. Squeaky clean and the perfect guy to manage the Yankees. I think to this day and forever onwards, the Yankee locker room would be like the Dallas Cowboys locker room. Derek Jeter owning the City and A-Rod wanting it instead, Jason Giambi juicing up before games with Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte. Hideki Matsui trying to figure out what's going on, and Phil Hughes and Ian Kennedy wondering what they have gotten themselves into. Joba looking into a mirror to see if he's a starter or a reliever, and Jorge Posada just trying to put himself together like humpty dumpty to play every night. Joe Torre was the glue of that team. All those over-priced babies and wanna-be's and egotistical glory hounds that the media made. John Sterling calling goofy home run calls ( how about this one John...... BIG TEX ROPES THAT ONE ! Joe Torre was the calming father figure and demanded and got respect from them. I can just see A-ROD, Jeter, Big Tex, or the like saying this :

" Hey Girardi, slide down the bench and make room for my wallet "

The egomaniacs run the Cowboys locker, not the coach. That's why they can't get the job done.  The Yankees can spend 500 million dollars, they won't win until there's another Joe Torre in that locker room demanding respect and playing hard. Joe Torre can say what he wants too. Inside all of us, we know its the truth anyhow. The New York media doesn't want to piss off Steinbrenner, he can ruin you just like Al Davis of the Oakland Raiders can. Besides, can you trust the New York media ? If I said A-Rod  was dating Paris Hilton, it would be in all the papers tomorrow morning. Good Luck Joe Torre in whatever you do. Nice job coaching that half-wit Manny Ramirez too.



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