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Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

Posted on: November 12, 2010 1:33 pm
 
There are now at least three people on the record saying they have knowledge of Cecil Newton soliciting money for his son Cameron to attend Mississippi State.

There is a lot of stuff out there right now about Newton being ineligible at the moment at Auburn. Not entirely true, according to information received Friday from the NCAA.

My question to the NCAA: If a person related to a prospective student-athlete solicits money for that student-athlete at a certain school then that student-athlete is ineligible. Is that true no matter where he signs?

This e-mail came back from NCAA spokesperson Stacey Osburn: Generally speaking, eligibility issues are tied to the student-athlete, not the school. So if a student-athlete is ineligible at one school and then transfers to a second school, the school the student-athlete transferred to would need to seek reinstatement.

I then reiterated my question saying a "prospective" student-athlete -- in other words a recruit -- not a "transfer".

Osburn came back with: Correct.

USA Today
got much the same response when it asked a similar question of Osburn.

In Friday's editions the paper stated, "Even if Newton received no money to attend Auburn, soliciting money can be an NCAA violation jeopardizing Newton's eligibility."

To me, all this means that Cam Newton isn't a slam dunk to be found ineligible at Auburn as some seem to think at this point. It doesn't look good, I'll give you that, but consider the Albert Means case. The former five-star Memphis prospect was being shopped around by his high school coach Lynn Lang. Means committed to Alabama, but ended up playing at Memphis. I suspect the fact that it was his coach and not a family member, that was a mitigating circumstance.

In this case ...  

1) First, it has to be proven that Newton's father was asking for money at Mississippi State. We're not there yet but as mentioned, at least three folks say he did.

2) Second, it has be determined whether Cecil Newton asked anyone at Auburn for money. If he did, whether Cameron knew or not, that pretty much seals the deal.

3) If Cecil Newton didn't ask Auburn, then we're back to Osburn's "generally speaking" response that the eligibility issues would be tied to the student-athlete. In other words, Newton could be ineligible at Auburn but it is not certain.

Here is the NCAA bylaw (10.1 unethical conduct) that seems to govern this situation ...

 
Unethical conduct by a prospective or enrolled student-athlete or a current or former institutional staff member
(e.g., coach, professor, tutor, teaching assistant, student manager, student trainer) may include, but is not limited
to, the following: 
 
(a) Refusal to furnish information relevant to an investigation of a possible violation of an NCAA regulation
when requested to do so by the NCAA or the individual’s institution;
 
(b) Knowing involvement in arranging for fraudulent academic credit or false transcripts for a prospective or an
enrolled student-athlete;
 
(c) Knowing involvement in offering or providing a prospective or an enrolled student-athlete an improper inducement
or extra benefit or improper financial aid; (Revised: 1/9/96)
 
(d) Knowingly furnishing or knowingly influencing others to furnish the NCAA or the individual’s institution false or misleading information ...
 
 
Violations of 10.1 are enforced as follows:
 
10.4 Disciplinary Action
 
Prospective or enrolled student-athletes found in violation of the provisions of this regulation shall be ineligible
for further intercollegiate competition, subject to appeal to the Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement for
restoration of eligibility.




Obviously, Auburn is comfortable enough to put the quarterback on the field. Auburn coach Gene Chizik said this week that Newton will start against Georgia.

 
Category: NCAAF
Comments

Since: Oct 6, 2006
Posted on: November 12, 2010 3:17 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

There is no verbiage in the NCAA's rules that preclude asking for money.  Note the rule provided by Dodd:

Here is the NCAA bylaw (10.1 unethical conduct) that seems to govern this situation ...

 
Unethical conduct by a prospective or enrolled student-athlete or a current or former institutional staff member
(e.g., coach, professor, tutor, teaching assistant, student manager, student trainer) may include, but is not limited
to, the following: 
 
(c) Knowing involvement in offering or providing a prospective or an enrolled student-athlete an improper inducement
or extra benefit or improper financial aid; (Revised: 1/9/96)


 
It does not provide that someone cannot request, only offering or providing a prospective student athlete.  This is not going to make him ineligible.

--------------------------------
Agree 100%.  amazing that the article says zero about the fact that money needs to change hands OR the University has to "offer" not just the kid or a rep "soliciting."



Since: Dec 5, 2006
Posted on: November 12, 2010 3:05 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

Well then Auburn University is clear. Who cares about rumors between Miss St or The University of Auburn. Cam is eligible at Auburn University.
I have nothing to contribute... haha.

WDE!!!



Since: Oct 1, 2007
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:59 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

This is possibly one of the most informative stories I have ever read on CBSSports.  Perhaps other CBS writers could take note at how this is an actual article worth reading.  Thanks, Dodd.



Since: Sep 17, 2006
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:59 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

AU and/or their boosters have absolutely no incentive to admit any wrong-doing they may be aware of.  They'd rather remain in denial mode through the season, hopefully win a national championship.  Should the NCAA come back in five years as they did with Reggie Bush, who really cares?  So the NCAA should offer AU and their boosters a deal such as, "If you fess up now, you forfeit all games Newton play in, lose scholarships over the next three years, can't compete for SEC or national title over next three years.  If you admit nothing, and we (NCAA) find out through our own investigation that the Newtons were paid, there will be the proverbial football death penalty."  That should get the attention of any possible wrong-doers.



Since: Aug 19, 2006
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:53 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

Auburn will tank a game and this will all go away.



Since: Nov 10, 2010
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:41 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

Notice the question in the article says "if" a person solicits money"  I am glad you don't work for the NCAA!!!



Since: Nov 10, 2010
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:39 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

If he was is or was ineligilbe.  You assume facts not in evidence...statements and rumors at this point only reported by the media not the NCAA or the SEC. Let's not forget that three of the so called stories that espn and Thayer Evans have already come apart. 



Since: Dec 14, 2006
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:33 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

"I suspect the fact that it was [Albert Means'] coach and not a family member, that was a mitigating circumstance."

False.  The University of Memphis appealed to the NCAA for Albert's reinstatement & it was granted.  Auburn could do the same but it's a little late for that (he has already played ineligibly in 9 games this year).



Since: Nov 10, 2010
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:26 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

People...although this is news to you all and the media...it has been consistenly reported that Auburn has investigated the and its recruitment of Cam Newton.  They have known about this.  AU compliance officer worked for the NCAA until 2006.  He is very thorough and good at his job. Do you really think that AU, a school that knows what it feels like to have suspensions and sanctions levied would put him on the field it he was inelligible.  Besides.  The SEC has refuted already the account by the coaches...a fact Dodd fails to mention. and Rogers has lied about the same story several times already.... he is discredited by John Bond and himself and Bill Bell....if the story holds........not credible.  And.....He said he called Bill Bell, Bill Bell allegedly said Cecil Newton asked for money.  Rogers is the main player hear and he is already under invetigation by the NFL and players asscoc. and now FBI for being a fraud.  And he actually just made their case against him and probably Bill Bell and MSU even stronger that is may have been.  Adn if this took place and MSU knew about it. In Nov. Why did MSU aggressivly recruit him until national signing Dec. 31 and not report until Jan.? Then held off on pursuing the matter for 7 months????   Look at the merits of this.  It is quite a sham(e)



Since: Sep 29, 2007
Posted on: November 12, 2010 2:26 pm
 

Cameron Newton's eligibility issues

wrong - it would mean he is an ineligible athlete / recruit to play anywhere.  It's an NCAA violation, not an MSU or Auburn violation.  Think of the NCAA as a clearinghouse.  You play by their rules to even be able to to then have the opportunity to violate university rules.

Except for the fact that right now the only evidence is from upset MSU boosters.  It sounds to me that this Rogers guy was trying to broker a deal that would have paid him a bunch of money.  I wonder what his cut of the 200k was?  75% maybe?  So if Cam either on his own went to Auburn or got wind of the payoff (and I'm still assuming innocent until proven guilty), knew it was wrong and went to Auburn he 1.) Screwed this guy out of his cut and 2.) Could have done the right thing getting away from it all. 

Lastly, were talking about a kid who got in trouble and had to go the juco route.  He wasn't worth 200k.  Plain and simple.  There is still some sort of huge missing piece to this story.

There is  so much that we don't know.........


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com