Blog Entry

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

Posted on: June 9, 2011 12:27 pm
Edited on: June 9, 2011 4:27 pm
 
Terrelle Pryor's attorney on Thursday called the latest allegations against the former Ohio State quarterback by ESPN "bogus", threatened legal action, and called the NCAA system a form of "slavery."

Columbus, Ohio, attorney Larry James made the comments Thursday morning while appearing on SiriusXM's "Jason & The GM" show on satellite radio. Thomas described himself as a local figure who had worked with Ohio State in the past and knew AD Gene Smith, president Gordon Gee and former coach Jim Tressel.

"It was probably good for Terrelle to meet persons like myself, African-American lawyers, very successful -- quote, unquote," James said.

James said he did not know that meeting would lead to his representation of the troubled former star. He went on to say that "most" of Pryor's wrongdoing is limited to the selling of memorabilia "when he was a freshman, 18 or 19 years old at the time".

Ohio State's problems seemed to escalate Tuesday when ESPN.com reported that Pryor had made $20,000-$40,000 selling memorabilia with the help of a local freelance photographer, Dennis Talbott. Talbott has denied the allegations. 

"I know Dennis Talbott," James said. "I don't mean to belittle Dennis Talbott but Dennis Talbott is not a deep-pockets player. This is out of his league. He does not have this kind of cash. He is not one of those dealers that one would say D has the ability to neg-buying and selling of memorabilia. Dennis was a part-time photographer who knew a lot of players. He was known around town. He is harmless. He definitely did not have that kind of wherewithal to do that kind of stuff and that story is just bogus."

The subsequent "Outside the Lines" report on ESPN, James said, "is close to being reckless and malice and over the line. This is something that Terrelle at the appropriate time may look at once he gets in the position to have the wherewithal to bring that lawsuit."

An unidentified former friend accused Pryor of taking the money in the ESPN reports.


James then went into detail describing Pryor's car situation that has come under scrutiny. With the NCAA curious about that situation, Pryor seemed to brashly drive to a team meeting Monday in a Nissan 350Z with temporary tags.

James explained that Pryor came to Columbus with a Hyundai Sonata purchased by his mother, Thomasina, when he was a senior in Jeanette, Pa. James said that after about a year, "that car practically dies," and Pryor's mother paid $11,000 for a Dodge Charger, again in Jeanette.

Over the next three years, the Charger was serviced "three or four" times requiring the use of a loaner car. At some point the Charger was traded in for the 350Z. The cars had the same approximate monthly payments, $298, according to James.

Six Ohio State players were cited by the NCAA in December for trading memorabilia for tattoos and other benefits late last year. Pryor was among those suspended for the first five games of 2011. However, Sports Illustrated last week quoted a source who witnessed nine other current players swap memorabilia or autographs for tattoos or money.

He then added of the nine new names published in SI, "They will be cleared. They will be cleared."

As for leaving the team when Pryor did, James said there is "division -- as you all know -- in the lockerroom among a lot folks."

"Terrelle looked at a situation where it was a hornet's test to try to continue to play football at Ohio State whether he was cleared or not."

He did not elaborate on that subject nor on the assertion that Pryor has had some "proposals" emailed from the Canadian Football League. James said he probably wouldn't negotiate any professional contract that Pryor would consider. There was no anger from Pryor, he said, after leaving the university.

"Irrespective of how harsh and idiotic we think some of the NCAA rules are, they are still on the books," James said. "They had slavery for all those years. Those rules are still on the books, and the courts uphold them."

James then ranted about the NCAA and its enforcement process.

"You've got a captured system here in college football. It's mandated, dictated, the student-athletes have no rights. They have no relief. It's an archaic, draconian process by which you are basically financed for about 9 1/2 months of your school year and then you're to find the money for whatever else is left. You live in basically poverty throughout that period and you're making a million dollars for institutions."

James said he was not aware of any NCAA violations by Pryor, "over the last couple of years that we have uncovered."

James was questioned by hosts Jason Horowitz, a CBSSports.com contributor, and Steve Phillips, the Mets' former GM.

Category: NCAAF
Comments

Since: Jan 16, 2010
Posted on: June 10, 2011 8:06 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

I am fed up with the slaverly reference everytime someone is caught doing wrong. Mr. Pryor was offered a chance to get a 200,000 education for free. In addition the school would provide him with room, board, books, and clothing. If Mr Pryor was struggling with his academics the school will provide him with help free of charge.

Last I checked nobody had a gun to his head about going to college, it was his choice. Considering that less than 2% of all players will get paid to play the game after college and dare I say it some of those players might even be white or of another race a free education might not be a bad trade. The idea that you are not paying loans off until your 35 might also make sense for many. Clearly the big programs make big money and as an athlete going in you are aware of that. There are however many programs look at all of the non AQs that loose money in their athletic department.

If you want to change the system start before you get caught breaking the rules. Mr. Pryor was the most sought after recruit in the country he should have brought this up while he was being recruited not after he was caught fencing product for cash and benefits.



Since: Mar 30, 2009
Posted on: June 10, 2011 8:02 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

Wow.....if a slave makes $20-$40K/year, and drives new vehicles ever so often witha suspended license, then strap me on a loin cloth and call me Kunta.  And, before all the bitching starts about me making light of slavery, so did the ass in the story.



Since: Mar 15, 2011
Posted on: June 10, 2011 7:55 am
 

Ncaa: modern slavery

Terrell and his African-American legal team need to sue the ncaa for big money for being treated like a slave at ohio state.  They will not stand for this and should demand big damages from ohio state and the ncaa as reparations.



Since: Oct 1, 2006
Posted on: June 10, 2011 7:52 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

I say let the lawyer respond in any way he wants.  If he wants to claim race, slavery, etc. what does it matter the media that reports this crap has not substantiated anything and continue to slander Terrelle Pryor.  Pryor legally has every right in the world to puruse legal actions against Sports Illustrated especially for the $20,000-40,000 comment. Seriously with the memorabilia that Pryor sold for $2500 he needs a whole lot more memorabilia to cover the $20,000.  If Terrelle Pryor was given everything than why did he has to sell personal possessions?   



Since: Jun 3, 2011
Posted on: June 10, 2011 7:04 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

Thankfully, Ohio State will still be more competitive than Georgia Tech or Tennessee.



Since: Aug 19, 2006
Posted on: June 10, 2011 4:57 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

If there's morons from the south that believe that Auburns Cam Newton did absolutely nothing wrong, or ignore the crap he did in community college, it's hard to see any kind of "justice" or "punishment" coming to Terrelle Pryor sadly.

I honeslty don't even care about Pryor because of scam newton getting off scott free after it was apparent to everyone including the NCAA..





Since: Feb 9, 2009
Posted on: June 10, 2011 3:12 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

Sebastien, you should check who owns the right to Big Ten games.  It is espn.  They usually air 1 or 2 games from the Big 10 at noon depending on matchups.  You are the idiot.  This lawyer should lose the right to practice law for not knowing what slavery is.  Pryor will not make it in the NFL.  Too many character issues.  He make Jamarcus Russell and Kenny Brit look like saints.  He his an idiot.   




Since: Sep 15, 2006
Posted on: June 10, 2011 3:04 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

kiss yourass goodby  theOSU, and thank Mr. Pryor, and his lawyer "Jackie Chiles " This IS a freeking sitcom.....Buh Bye Thugboy



Since: Jan 3, 2007
Posted on: June 10, 2011 1:33 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

Extremely primitive viewpoint.  Tell that to the students who get full rides because of grades.  What do you think pays for those academic free rides?  You got it.  Big time college athletics.  Smarties are getting a free college education off the back of college athletes who are putting their well being on the line for 11-13 weeks every year.
Wrong. Wrong. and Wrong.
We "Smarties" Got our free ride academic scholarships because alumni created what is called an "endowment"  &n
bsp; We got free tuition because some billionare alumni donated a crap-ton to the university to provide scholarships for those of us who "in the judgement of the selction commitee" met the academic standards required to be educated.   It was NOT paid for by the athletic program.   Sometimes the athletic department will kick some money back into the so called "general scholarship fund" but there are very few schools that can afford to do that.  Mine was one of them.

And even the free tuition still did not include books, room and board, or transportation;  Which the athletic scholies get.   Even the ones rowing on the crew tram



Since: Dec 19, 2006
Posted on: June 10, 2011 1:15 am
 

Terrelle Pryor's lawyer threatens legal action

notorious98


ever hear of endowment funds.  athletics have very, very little to do with the "smarties" getting free rides.  their minds do.  they are the ones smart enough to use the free education to actually learn.  


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com