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Blog Entry

LSU now on NCAA clock

Posted on: July 19, 2011 7:23 pm
Edited on: July 19, 2011 8:15 pm
 
There's no arguing about the timing of LSU's first major violation in football in 25 years. It's fantastic. Coming a day before the start of the SEC media days, the gossip is sure to be flying in the halls of the Wynfrey Hotel when the interviews kick off on Wednesday. Flying like the anticipated quips from South Carolina's Steve Spurrier.

But let's focus. For now this is about LSU. The present is somewhat uplifting. The NCAA threw roses at the school's proactive approach during the investigation. The future, NCAA-wise, looks murky.

Certainly Tuesday's penalties are nothing more than embarrassing: probation, a couple of scholarships. Nothing really damaging -- for the moment. It's the way LSU got there. A former assistant coach was charged with unethical conduct in the recruitment of a juco receiver who never saw the field.

That adds up to a major violation which opens up a whole new world to NCAA wrongdoers. If you're counting, that's two former SEC coaches charged with the most serious of NCAA crimes -- unethical conduct. Tennessee's Bruce Pearl is the other. SEC commissioner Mike Slive cannot be amused. Neither can the NCAA. Suddenly, the clock is ticking on LSU. 

If you're not familiar with the term, "repeat violator" it was installed by the NCAA in the 1980s. It was meant to be a deterrent to habitual cheaters like SMU. Two major violations within a five-year period and you're eligible for the death penalty. Since 1987, though, no other school has been hit that hard in football. So much for being a deterrent.

LSU is in a unique position. For years it took pride in being one of only two SEC schools not to have a major football violation in the last quarter century. The other was Vanderbilt, which has never had a major violation. LSU's last big screw up was in 1986.

But these are different and possibly treacherous times for the Tigers. They are perceived to be SEC and national title contenders. But at the same time the penalties were announced on Tuesday, the football program was simultaneously under investigation because of Will Lyles. The infamous mentor/talent scout has reportedly been paid a combined $26,000 since 2008 by the school for recruiting information.

Nothing wrong with that if, in fact, Lyles provided recruiting info on the up and up and didn't guide players to Baton Rouge. Les Miles told me in April that he didn't know who Lyles was until December. That's plausible but strange considering Lyles reportedly had a long-term relationship with the program and had been paid five figures in the last three years.

That's fishy enough. Let's not forget Lyles is at the center of the Oregon investigation as well. Cal has been linked to him too. That possibly makes Lyles the Hart Lee Dykes of his generation. The former Oklahoma State receiver put four schools on probation after his recruitment. There is still the possibility that Lyles damns three BCS programs to the fiery hell of NCAA probation.

Those two particular violations (Tuesday and Lyles) wouldn't qualify LSU as a repeat violator because the Lyles case started before Tuesday's was completed. But two major violations so close together -- if indeed it comes to that -- aren't going to be looked favorably upon by the NCAA. 

Maybe we shouldn't be surprised. Vanderbilt is now the only SEC school without a major violation in its history . Maybe that's life in the SEC. Maybe its winning percentage reflects that fact.

So let the gossip begin in the halls of the Wynfrey. Sure, it looks like business as usual in the SEC. Alabama is on probation. Defending champion Auburn is being investigated on two fronts. Slive won't be happy having to deal with more transgressions.

How bad is it? Since we started our series on college football wrongdoing on July 6, LSU is the third school (from three different conferences) to be hit with a major football violation. That's three in 13 days. Three is the average number of such violations nationally PER YEAR since 1987.

There's still five months left in the year to make those numbers even more alarming. Meanwhile, the NCAA has all the time in the world. Maybe it's not an SEC thing, it's just a college football thing.
Category: NCAAF
Tags: LSU, NCAA, SEC
 
Comments

Since: Dec 3, 2006
Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:56 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

As usual, you don't let facts get in your way.  LSU is not subject to repeat offender status if indeed there was any wrongdoing involved with the "$6,000" package (32 DVDs and 91 page booklet) they received from Lyles.  Let's see if you can figure out why .... but ...... it would mean you will have to research the facts rather than present some creative writing in an effort to get folks to read your article.  Seriously!!!!


Zydeco, the sad part is that he wouldn't even have to do much research.  All he would have to do would be to read a couple of well written articles that detail the truth and pass the work off as his own and he would sound much more informed and intelligent.  But even that is too much for him.




Since: Dec 3, 2006
Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:52 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

Of note is that LSU paid $26000 to Lyles while Oregon paid $25000 to Lyles.  Hmmm, nothing to see in Baton Rouge but time for an investigation in Eugene.

That is because this is a false statement intended to cloud the reality that Lyles only got paid $6000 for materials that he delivered to LSU (reports and DVDs) and then LSU, in turn, turned this material over to the NCAA in its entirety.   So you are likely correct that there is nothing to see here except what people like Dodd want to make up/distort out of it.



Since: Jul 19, 2011
Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:48 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

As usual, you don't let facts get in your way.  LSU is not subject to repeat offender status if indeed there was any wrongdoing involved with the "$6,000" package (32 DVDs and 91 page booklet) they received from Lyles.  Let's see if you can figure out why .... but ...... it would mean you will have to research the facts rather than present some creative writing in an effort to get folks to read your article.  Seriously!!!!








Since: Dec 3, 2006
Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:48 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

Way to go Dudd.  At the least you could argue in your defense that you are distorting the truth with your "facts" about the amounts paid but in reality, you are blatently making up this story, at least in part.  LSU paid Lyles $26,000?  Or is it in reality that it paid services that Lyles was employed by or affiliated with part of this money?  Big difference in accuracy.  Also, you act like this wasn't well reported quite some time ago.  This is not a new story in any way and the punishment is already at least half over.  Finally, if the year of probation is the most that we are looking at and the Lyles case cannot put us in a "repeat offender" status, what is the motivation for bringing it up except to sensationalize your story and make it look like it is more than it is.  E$PN has a long history of making the news when the truth of the story doesn't suit them and it burned them more than once with one example being against LSU and Les in 2007.  You and CBS are coming close to falling down the same hole. 



Since: Jul 19, 2011
Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:22 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock



Of note is that LSU paid $26000 to Lyles while Oregon paid $25000 to Lyles.  Hmmm, nothing to see in Baton Rouge but time for an investigation in Eugene.

There is a big difference in your statement with the amount that LSU has paid Will Lyles.

LSU did not pay Lyles that much $26,000 in a single year or ever, they paid the company Will Lyles works for this past year $6,000. They paid a total of $26,000 since 2008 not in a single year. Where as Oregon paid $25,000 directly to Will Lyles in a single year. That is the problem the NCAA has with Oregon and a big difference than the way you put it. LSU has not hidden anything once they saw the report after it was released they sent everything they had on Will Lyles to the NCAA without the NCAA asking for it unlike Oregon they where made to do it then did not send it all then the NCAA had to come back and make them give everything not just this past year everything to do with Will Lyles. The NCAA has an issue with the fact that Chip Kelly was not forth coming in admitting his transactions with Lyles and why.




Since: Jun 30, 2009
Posted on: July 19, 2011 11:05 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

All I have to say if this was tOSU and was their first major in a long time Dodd would trash them like they killed the Pope.  Nice slant Dodd.



Since: Dec 2, 2006
Posted on: July 19, 2011 10:55 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

I must point out that in a sense, I found that LSU deserves kudo's. When you look at what the NCAA said it was clear that LSU's Compliance department did a wonderful job and it was for that reason, the NCAA treated them the way they did. They were actually rather complimentary of LSU and their response. In fact, the Compliance dept stepped in and did not allow this recruit to travel much less play in a game in 09 because they had questions to clear up, and had they not done so, LSU may have found themselves in more hot water.



Since: Nov 12, 2006
Posted on: July 19, 2011 10:24 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

"SEC commissioner Mike Slive cannot be amused."
That's good. Mike Slime is an a$$hole and an embarrassment to the conference.



Since: Jul 19, 2011
Posted on: July 19, 2011 10:17 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

In your article you say "Since 1987, though, no other school has been hit that hard in football. So much for being a deterrent."

I'm not an LSU apologist/fan by any means (I hate the SEC from a fan's perspective), but doesn't the fact that there have been no so-called death penalties since 1987 actually make one more likely to conclude that the rule has successfully deterred other egregious activity? The underlying implication of your statement is only true if there are cases on similar levels as SMU that have gone unpunished by the death penalty--multiple times.  Otherwise, it has been a deterrent, not just in name and purpose but in practice as well.

Moreover, you state that unthical conduct is the most serious NCAA violation.  I do not agree.  Essentially, paying recruits to attend your school is what the entire system is designed to stop.  That may be overly simplistic, but it's pretty true nonetheless.  It's really all about eliminating non-inherent advantages that influence high school athletes to choose a certain school.  It's about maintaining amateurism. Unethical conduct, whatever that may be, is a violation.  But the most serious?  Hardly.

Making those two statements makes me question the premise on which you based your article.  While attacking the NCAA is certainly in vogue, how about it be done with sound arguments?  Stop with the syllogism and hyperbole and I, for one, will not be lead to believe that predetermined conclusions underscore your publications.



Since: Mar 2, 2009
Posted on: July 19, 2011 9:11 pm
 

LSU now on NCAA clock

So LSU gets a slap on the wrist for MAJOR VIOLATIONS while Boise State gets hammered for having players sleep on the floor at other players houses...anyone else think the NCAA favors the SEC?


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