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What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

Posted on: August 8, 2011 6:45 pm
Edited on: August 9, 2011 10:17 am
 
Let's calculate the odds of any real change coming out of this week's NCAA presidential retreat.

All we have is history which has not been kind. In the late 1980s, the nation's college presidents were charged with taking control of athletic landscape amid a time of scandal. In other words, live up to their job description.

So much for that. In the quarter century since 1987 (SMU death penalty) college football has averaged three football major violation cases per year. In one 13-day period in July (during our reform series, consequently), three schools went on probation in football in less than two weeks.

The presidential initiative hasn't failed -- the venerable Myles Brand was the first NCAA CEO to come from the academic side. It has been more uneven. For good reason.

Athletics aren't a front burner item to most college CEOs. They are in charge of what are frequently billion-dollar budgets. Athletics is a small part of that budget. They would be no big deal if the embarrassment factor weren't plugged in.

"Athletics is about two percent of my budget," Penn State president Graham Spanier said, "but probably 10 percent of my time. Clearly, I spend a disproportionate time on athletics. It's the one area that brings credit to you if you do it right. At the same time it's the area of the university that has the chance to bring discredit to the university."

Remember, this is from the CEO of one of two schools with football national championships that have never had a major violation in football. (BYU is the other.)

Look at what has happened recently at Ohio State and North Carolina. The presidents, in a way, have ignored the importance of athletics as their school's reputation took a hit. Ohio State's outgoing Gordon Gee is still being ripped for his March 8 comment about Jim Tressel.

"I'm just hoping the coach doesn't dismiss me."

While watching his football program slowly disintegrate from within, North Carolina chancellor Holden Thorp inadvertently committed an NCAA secondary violation.

These are the leaders of the NCAA. And their time is running out.

"I'm deeply worried about football," Spanier told me this summer. "I believe if we don't fix some of the problems in football, [that] in five years it will be as bad as basketball."

That's as damning as it gets. There are a lot of folks in college athletics who believe basketball is so far gone that it is irretrievable. Football still has a chance. That's why this retreat was called, to discuss the big picture but to concentrate on football.

A collection of presidents (Spanier is among them), ADs and commissioners will gather in Indy to discuss academic success, fiscal sustainability and integrity. Those are NCAA president Mark Emmert's words. We'll see if anything comes of them.

The difference this time is we have talking points. Most notably, SEC commissioner Mike Slive proposed a new model at the conference media days. The BCS commissioners basically agree with him.

If the NCAA (read: presidents) don't take significant action on those proposals, the commissioners can throw up their hands and say, "Hey, we tried our best." In a small way, Slive's words publicized the leverage those commissioners hold. Do nothing, and the minutia of the NCAA Manual could drive them to someday break away and form their own division.

That move alone could be driven by the current discussion over cost of attendance. But NCAA president Mark Emmert is against any kind of model that would make players employees.

"I am adamantly opposed to paying student-athletes to be athletes," he told me. "There is merit in having discussion about increasing of the support they get to manage their legitimate costs of being a student."

We're back, then, to the old conundrum of fitting a profit-driven pursuit into an academic/amateur model.

"I would rather do away with collegiate athletics than abandon the amateur model," Spanier said.

 It is more than interesting that it is the commissioners who are suddenly taking the lead on NCAA reform.

"It's a different day when commissioners are almost in competition to see who can come up with the best reform package," Emmert said.

Slive makes perfect sense when he suggests doing away with text and phone call limitations for coaches. This is how modern teenagers communicate. If they choose not to respond to a coach, they don't have to.

"When you really think about it, why can't coaches make phone calls?" Slive said. "Our focus needs to be on those rules and regulations that go to the heart and soul of the integrity we want in intercollegiate athletics."

In other words, smash the Tressels. Ignore the texters.

So it's up to you, presidents. If you don't want to get that integrity back it's time for action. In a vague and complicated way, those commissioners have issued a challenge. It has become clear that the NCAA controls basketball because of the billions being produced by the tournament. The commissioners, though, control football. They created and manage the BCS, which awards $200 million in bowl payouts.

And if you control football, you control college athletics. Slive did what Emmert couldn't, call from specific sweeping changes to the NCAA. Emmert has no real power on the subject. He is a figurehead -- a highly educated and accomplished one, but still a figurehead. He represents 1,200 schools with different constituencies, goals and budgets.

All you have to do is look at the Longhorn Network situation. Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe took the lead, issuing a temporary ban on televising high school games. Big 12 ADs voted unanimously last week on a one-year moratorium. With a summit addressing the issue scheduled for later this month, I asked Emmert if there was any NCAA bylaw to cover the televising of prep games.

"Maybe," he said. 

(Here is a full Q & A with Emmert.)

Comments

Since: Aug 18, 2010
Posted on: August 9, 2011 11:01 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

Bump rule--STUPID as written.  If the NCAA really does not want coaches talking to students during certain periods, then simply ban the coachess from the schools during that period.  Saban abuses the bump rule every year, and nothing comes of it.  Why have it?  How many pages are devoted to it?  Are there restrictions for the business dept at a school on how often they can contact perspective students? 



Since: May 23, 2011
Posted on: August 9, 2011 10:44 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

420 if you take out the glossary. Smile

To answer your question:  yes.  They don't just make up rules to have them, the rules are in place because there have been problems in the past.  A lot of it is clarification because they can't think of everything all the time (which is why the 'Cecil rule' will be in the new book that is coming out any day now).  The book also covers much, much, much more than recruiting rules and contact times and it is all pretty much necessary to level the playing field as much as possible.  Can the book be cut down?  Probably.  A little.  But it would never be to the satisfaction of most.  And cutting down too much would allow the field to be tilted in favor of the wealthiest schools.

Starting over would require every athletics administrator and coach to learn the new rules overnight, many of which cannot be explained on the back of a serial box or in a 30 minute rules education meeting.

The rules can certainly be overwhelming to the lay person, but the NCAA doesn't have the lay person in mind when crafting them.



Since: Aug 18, 2010
Posted on: August 9, 2011 10:33 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

The current NCAA rulebook is 434 pages.  Do we really need 434 pages to tell coaches about recruiting rules and contact times and the like.  My strongest belief is that quite a few of those 434 pages are nonsense.  Even with all those pages, nothing in the rules about what Cecil Newtown did.  I definitely believe they need to start over and get it right.



Since: May 23, 2011
Posted on: August 9, 2011 10:11 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

The NCAA rulebook is like the tax code, it need to be totally redone, and quickly.  How about these guys figure out what the priorities are and try to focus on that.  Secondary violations are the dumbest thing out there.  Why track and report them if nothing comes out of them.  Drop them.  The rules should be easy to understand, therefore they would be much easier to find and punish.  I would make the punishment harsh for the rule breakers so as to make these coaches and boosters think twice about breaking them.  Big money boosters should also be in the conversation at this convention.  They do not cost the school or NCAA any money, so I think you have to talk about how serious you really want to take them.  If they pay the kid, does the NCAA really need to care.  I know bigger schools would have the much bigger advantage as they have more big money boosters.  So, either punish them harshly, or just let it go.  I am not advocating an opinion here, just throwing something out there that is and will continue to be a problem. 


We'll have to agree to disagree on the rule book being too complex.  The big rules are clear cut, while there is an army of administrators on campus to help coaches with the lesser known rules.  And secondary violations are important, IMO.  There have been many times in the past where schools get hit with major penalties for continuously violating the lesser known rules (typically when they know the rule and simply ignore it).

I do agree on crushing schools/boosters who pay players.  Allowing them to do so would destroy the game we love.



Since: Aug 18, 2010
Posted on: August 9, 2011 10:03 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

The NCAA rulebook is like the tax code, it need to be totally redone, and quickly.  How about these guys figure out what the priorities are and try to focus on that.  Secondary violations are the dumbest thing out there.  Why track and report them if nothing comes out of them.  Drop them.  The rules should be easy to understand, therefore they would be much easier to find and punish.  I would make the punishment harsh for the rule breakers so as to make these coaches and boosters think twice about breaking them.  Big money boosters should also be in the conversation at this convention.  They do not cost the school or NCAA any money, so I think you have to talk about how serious you really want to take them.  If they pay the kid, does the NCAA really need to care.  I know bigger schools would have the much bigger advantage as they have more big money boosters.  So, either punish them harshly, or just let it go.  I am not advocating an opinion here, just throwing something out there that is and will continue to be a problem. 



Since: Aug 15, 2006
Posted on: August 9, 2011 10:02 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

Dodd,

Saying it over and over does not make it true or correct. Get off your soapbox and wash your mouth out with what is in the box.



Since: Sep 18, 2006
Posted on: August 9, 2011 10:01 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

How much money did the ncaa spend on this retreat?  Did they go first class?   Players are punished for selling some things that belong to them to have a few bucks to spend but the fat cats are at the trough eating high on the hog.




Since: Sep 18, 2006
Posted on: August 9, 2011 10:00 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

How much money did the ncaa spend on this retreat?  Did they go first class?   Players are punished for selling some things that belong to them to have a few bucks to spend but the fat cats are at the trough eating high on the hog.




Since: Jun 30, 2009
Posted on: August 9, 2011 8:35 am
 

What to expect from this week's NCAA retreat

did you slam The Ohio State University

no need to read a Dodd article of course he did.  and I am guessing he praised the SEC in some way.


diffendale
Since: Jan 2, 2010
Posted on: August 9, 2011 5:45 am
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