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Blog Entry

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Posted on: December 6, 2011 5:32 pm
Edited on: December 7, 2011 10:03 am
 

Start with the fact the Big East has BCS membership only because of a hall pass.

The BCS commissioners awarded the conference a waiver to stay in the club in 2007 just, well, because. Back then, the Big East still had enough existing juice from its teams and power from its administrators to keep its nose under the BCS tent.

No more.

You don’t have to be told that the Big East hasn’t had a team ranked in the final BCS top 20 since 2009. Or had one team in the top 10 of the BCS since 2008. (The Big Ten has had seven.) Such things matter when a conference is being awarded an $18 million-$20 million bowl game each year just, because.

That’s why you may have noticed the Big East is expanding, to chase that magic BCS berth like it was a contact high. CBSSports.com’s Brett McMurphy reported Tuesday that Boise State, San Diego State, Houston, SMU and Central Florida will join the league in 2013.

The problem is no one really knows what it all means. Four of the five new schools are basically warm bodies to keep the Big East afloat. The league is hoping the fifth, Boise, can keep the conference in the BCS big time. Air Force and Navy may join later.

But there’s no certainty the BCS is even going to be around in a few years. Commissioners will spend most of the next year deciding what college football’s postseason will look like beginning in 2014 (when the current BCS contract expires). The question – now that there is a bit of clarity regarding Big East membership – is if the league is better off with this current expansion.

Short answer: No. Not even close. The schools that have left – West Virginia, Syracuse and Pittsburgh – have accounted for five BCS bowls in the 14-year history of the system. That’s more than twice as many as the new schools bring to the table, all of them by Boise State (two).

But what choice did the Big East have? After the latest ACC raid, it just needed a heartbeat.

Here is  breakdown between the old and new. Decide for yourself if the Big East is worthy of a BCS bid.

(Note: We are considering the “highest level of football” since 1973 when Division I was established by the NCAA. Boise State moved up to Division I-A in 1996. All ranking references are to the Associated Press and BCS.)

 

Boise State

Conference: Mountain West, first year

Age of program at highest level of college football: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Broncos ended the season ranked (1998-present): Seven

The last year the Broncos ended the season ranked: 2011

BCS bowls: two (2007 Fiesta, 2010 Fiesta)

 

San Diego State

Conference: Mountain West, 13th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Aztecs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Aztecs ended the season ranked: 1977

BCS bowls: None.

 

Houston

Conference: Conference USA, 16th year

Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Cougars ended the season ranked: One (2011)

The last year the Cougars ended the season ranked: 1990

BCS bowls: None



SMU

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year
 
Age of program at highest level: 39th year in Division I/Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era that the Mustangs ended the season ranked: None.

The last year the Mustangs ended ranked: 1984

BCS bowls: None.

  

Central Florida

Conference: Conference USA, sixth year  

Age of program at highest level: 16th year in Division I-A/FBS

Years in the BCS era the Knights ended the season ranked: One (2010)

The last year the Knights ended ranked: 2010.

BCS bowls: None.

 

The skinny on new teams

Average stay in current conference: 8.4 years

Average age of new programs at highest level of football: 29.8 years

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: Nine (average of 1.8 times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: 16.4 years

Last season ranked at the end of the season: Boise, 2011

Total BCS bowls: Two.

 

The skinny on departing teams (West Virginia, Pittsburgh, Syracuse)

Average stay in current conference: 20 years (Each year was a charter member in football.)

Average age of programs playing at the highest level of football: 39

Total seasons in the BCS era that ended with a ranking: 12 (average of four times per school)

Average length of time, in years, since last end-of-season ranking: four

Last season ranked at end of the season: 2011 (West Virginia)

Total BCS bowls: 5


Comments

Since: Jan 5, 2012
Posted on: January 5, 2012 1:27 am
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Actually, think it's really important to consider that Non-AQ teams rarely have the opportunity to play such tough schedules for the very reason that they aren't AQ.  It's a destructive cycle type of situation where the favorites are consistently favored and everyone else is neglected.  Houston had an outstanding team this year, but they didn't have the competition by which to prove it.  Their only loss versus Southern Miss was a fluke that might have resulted from the members of this current team's first exposure to nationally broadcast television.  If they had had a schedule like Baylor had this year, for example, they would have had the opportunity to move higher in the rankings and secure a better bowl game, which, in my opinion, they deserved.

Also, the AQ teams are able to recruit more easily, and get extra money from all the exposure they get and the bowl games they inevitably play; so non-AQ teams are just out of luck.  It takes an extraordinary amount of hard work, investment, and sometimes sheer luck just for a non-AQ team to get the opportunity to play in a bowl game or get an invite to an AQ conference.  I don't think it's right to take that for granted.

Finally, I think the BCS needs to be reformed big-time (see complaints listed above).  Otherwise, we would all benefit from a well-planned playoff approach.



Since: Dec 8, 2006
Posted on: December 15, 2011 8:00 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

This very well may be the worst article Dodd has every written. Syracuse leaving means nothing for football. The only reason the Big East had five BCS games with Pitt and West Virginia, is becuase they had an auto bid smart guy? ReallY? They had 2 or 3 losses most of those years. They haven't once gone undefeated and Boise has had 1 loss how many years in the past 10 years? Well, the answer is all of them except for one year in 2007 when they had 3 losses. They SHOULD have 5 BCS bowls under their belt alone, but because of their former conference, they have 2 and they won them both! The BCS is stupid anyway and should just go away, but this article is subjective as he#$. Get real Dodd. Seriously.



Since: Sep 27, 2011
Posted on: December 9, 2011 1:48 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

In two years of recruiting to a BCS conference the new teams will make a huge gain in the BCS and other rankings. Good point Simple People.



Since: Mar 2, 2009
Posted on: December 9, 2011 1:40 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

So you call yourself a "Superstar", but are unaware that WVU won both the 2006 Sugar Bowl over SEC champ Georgia and the 2008 Fiesta Bowl over Big 12 champ Oklahoma?

Like most Big East bashers...full of it.



Since: Dec 17, 2006
Posted on: December 9, 2011 1:25 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Sailon,
That actually isnt even remotely true. Southern Miss is ranked this year after going 10-2 with losses against Marshall and UAB. Thats right Marshall and UAB. Houston hit #6 in the country having never played a tough opponent. People hand out way to many "facts" based off of things that havent been true for years.
Go look at the schedulles of the ranked non BCS teams this season, and then try to tell me with a straight face that any of them played a tougher schedule. That is a joke.



Since: Aug 16, 2006
Posted on: December 8, 2011 5:54 pm
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

What Dodd does not say is that a team in a non BCS conference has to be much better than a BCS team to be ranked in the top 25, thus fewer non BCS teams in the top 25.

Sailon, that is only partly true.  The perception is non-AQ conferences have easier conference schedules than BCS conferences do.  As a result, in order for a non-AQ school to get equal consideration for the Championship Game (or even a BCS bowl), the non-AQ school needs to have a rugged non-conference schedule to even things out in terms of overall schedule strength. 

To illustrate this concept, I'll use Houston as an example.  Even if Houston had beaten So Miss to run the table, there was practically no chance the Cougars would have passed Bama for the right to play LSU...not with a soft C -USA schedule and certainly not with an OOC schedule including UCLA, North Texas, La Tech and Georgia St.  I'll exaggerate this to make a point.  How would a 13-0 Houston have been perceived if its OOC slate had included wins over USC, Clemson, Georgia and Oklahoma State?  My guess is Houston would then be THE choice for the other BCS NCG bid everywhere except SEC country.

My point is a non-AQ conference school does not have to be drastically better than BCS conference schools in order to gain a BCS bid, but it does have to have a more difficult OOC schedule in order to be perceived as equals.



Since: Jan 2, 2010
Posted on: December 8, 2011 11:32 am
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

This move by the Big WEast (W=west & E= east) leaves the East Coast wide open for a real eastern conference. The "ACE" (Atheletic Conference of the East) should include the major cites of the east. Football = Florida Atlantic (Miami) , Buffalo, UMASS (Boston), Temple (Philly), Navy (DC area), Army, Delaware, Marshall, ECU, UAB (Birmingham), USMiss, Future football teams Geogia St. (Atlanta), Charlotte, Fordham (NYC), Basketball members VCU (Richmond), College of Charleston, N FL (Jacksonville) & George Washington.



Since: Aug 26, 2011
Posted on: December 8, 2011 11:18 am
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

dbull obviously has never watched a Big East game EVER. Big East teams play their best against WV year in and year out, everyone wants to beat us. Don't think so? Go ask the fans of each school who is the one school they want to see go down every year. And to lump Boise State in right now I have ALWAYS found to be funny. Are they a good team? Yes. Do they have a really weak schedule year in and year out? Yes they do. Kellen Moore has also held that team together for the past 4 years and he is gone next year. They beat an overrated Georgia team to start the season this year(their only ranked opponent) and lost to TCU. I'm getting sick of WVU getting knocked by ANYONE in the BE. For the past SEVEN years we have gone atleast 9-3 each year, we have ended ranked every year but once since 2005(Pitt once, RU once, Louisville and Cincy a couple times, no one else).



Since: Dec 8, 2011
Posted on: December 8, 2011 11:11 am
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

Need to check your facts,    WV   has played (and won)   The Fiesta AND Sugar.   Against SEC (Georgia) and Big 12 champ (Oklahoma)



Since: Oct 23, 2011
Posted on: December 8, 2011 10:27 am
 

Comparing old Big East to new Big East

I am not sure if the BE is better today than before, but at least the argument should be fair and Dodd you again are not.  BCS bowl selection is not about excellence on the field but seats in front of the television or at the game.  To hold otherwise in the face of the VT Michigan selection instead of Kansas State and BSU is ludicrous.  To hold that Pitt and Syracuse take football pluses with them- really?  The BE champ since the BCS "hall pass" has been UConn, Cincinnati, Louisville and this year West Virginia.  The departure of West Virginia is a lose in football- but the Big 12 (given up for dead in August of this year) along with the ACC are in survival mode. Some league was suppose to disappearance this year and when the Big 12 did not it was the BE on the burner.   The game we are watching played out is political (power), social (old guard vs. new kid in town), economic (keeping the number of conferences taking a piece of the BCS pie) and communication (who is owned by CBS, ESPN, Fox and the emerging NBC) get the better praise.  Nothing more and nothing less. 



The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com