Blog Entry

What's in store for Mets without Delgado

Posted on: May 18, 2009 9:39 pm
Edited on: May 18, 2009 10:12 pm
 

LOS ANGELES -- The New York Mets say they're not going to panic while Carlos Delgado is gone for what could be two months or more. They say they're going to use a combination of Fernando Tatis and Jeremy Reed at first base with maybe a little Daniel Murphy thrown in.

And that's all well and good.

Until the Mets, leading the NL East by half-a-game over Philadelphia heading into Monday night's games, hit one of those infamous valleys they've had a habit of slipping into over the past few summers. Then all bets are off.

"The team is playing well," says Tony Bernazard, the Mets' vice-president for player development. "As long as we continue to play well, I don't see any need to make changes."

Question is, are these Mets (21-16) capable of continuing to win at a .568 clip without Delgado?

That's a question that will come with a multi-layered answer over the next several days and weeks:

 Gary Sheffield, 40, will see more playing time in the immediate future, and for the Mets' sake, that cannot come with diminishing returns. He was hitting .254 with a .390 on-base percentage, two homers and seven RBI in 31 games heading into Monday night's. For a guy who looked nearly finished in Detroit, he's shown some life at the plate. But what's the shelf-life of that if he plays every day?

"These are the things we have to find out, and we don't know until we go through a stretch of games in a row without off days," Mets manager Jerry Manuel says.

Short-term, expect Sheffield to serve as designated hitter some this weekend in Boston when interleague play begins.

 Manuel's managing acumen will be tested. Because he's going to have to find the right combination of pushing Sheffield with more playing time than anybody originally planned, but by pulling back if Sheffield tires, his swing slows or his body begins to ache.

"I'm going to have to manage him," Manuel acknowledges.

The Mets like Sheffield in the middle of their lineup because, even though they acknowledge he's not the hitter he once was, he's a presence. That helps make up for the presence they've lost in Delgado (.298, four homers, 23 RBI).

 Now is a good time for third baseman David Wright, 26, to step up and lead. Wright's place in the Mets' clubhouse hierarchy has been debated before in his development. It's reached the point where it should be his team, but when longer-tenured and older veterans like Delgado are around, that's easier said than done.

Now, with a clear void, does Wright step into it?

"That's a good question," Manuel says. "I think you want a guy in the infield taking charge. It's difficult to do that from center field. To be a third baseman and out there every day performing, it's definitely a good opportunity. And I think I've seen some of that (already)."

 Wright, Carlos Beltran and shortstop Jose Reyes have to be careful not to try and make up for the loss of Delgado by themselves, but they need to produce.

"Of the two Carloses, Reyes and Wright, we've always wanted two of the four of them hot," Manuel says. "Now we want two of the three hot. As long as it's still two. ..."

 As for the first base combo, the right-handed Tatis and the lefty Reed should get most of the playing time at the bag. Tatis, 34, has been impressive so far: .308 and a .365 OBP in 23 games (65 at-bats). Reed, 27, is hitting .357 with a .400 OBP in 32 games (28 at-bats).

Murphy's time at first likely will depend on how much time Sheffield spends in the outfield and how Tatis and Reed are doing at first. While none of the three is a natural first baseman, that doesn't bother Manuel.

"We made a real good run last year with people not at their natural positions," he says. "We had two third basemen in the outfield (Tatis and Murphy) and they responded well."

 If things to falter and the Mets look to the outside for a trade, two names already floated are Baltimore's Aubrey Huff and Washington's Nick Johnson.

For now, the Mets will find out what they're made of.

They hope the answer is more positive than when they faced that same question in each of the past two seasons.

Comments

Since: Aug 17, 2006
Posted on: May 19, 2009 4:33 pm
 

What's in store for Mets without Delgado

Nick Johnson is the answer. Murphy can not play first OR the outfield for that matter. And his bat lacks the power required to be without a position and still be on a team. Tatis CANNOT play everyday. Neither can Sheff. As far as Wright, he can be the leader if he wants to helm. The Spanish comment is funny, but still ridiculous.




Since: Oct 20, 2008
Posted on: May 19, 2009 3:30 pm
 

What's in store for Mets without Delgado

The Mets are dead last in the NL in homeruns, and Carlos Delgado was their leader in that category.  If they don't get one or more sluggers in there now, the offense will degrade even further.  This team just can't get the job done from David Wright, Beltran, and a bunch of scrubs like Ryan Church, Gary Sheffield, Angel Pagan, etc.



Since: Oct 3, 2006
Posted on: May 19, 2009 2:11 pm
 

What's in store for Mets without Delgado

Two things:
  • David Wright can't be the true leader of that team unless he's fluent in Spanish
  • The Mets will be okay without Delgado. They can play Sheff in left field and put Murphy at first base, or just start Tatis. I also like the idea of trading for Nick Johnson.


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