Blog Entry

Slow meetings, price of pitching and more

Posted on: December 10, 2009 6:06 pm
 

INDIANAPOLIS -- As baseball executives made like Indy 500 cars and sped toward the airport around midday Thursday -- braving freezing temperatures, a biting wind and ice-covered trees along the way -- the one clear thing that emerged from a mostly slow-paced winter meetings was predictable:

The best hedge against an economy that is squeezing many is if you making your living pitching a baseball.

When Brad Penny, 31 and released by the Red Sox last summer before he hooked on with San Francisco, signed a one-year deal for a $7.5 million base salary plus another $1.5 million in incentives with St. Louis, it raised more than a few eyebrows.

When Randy Wolf, 33 and having missed time with both shoulder and elbow injuries during the past four years, signed a whopping three-year, $29.75 million deal with Milwaukee, it practically raised the roof of the Indianapolis Marriott.

And when Rich Harden, who seems to be stricken with some type of injury every 100 pitches, signed a one-year deal for $6.5 million with Texas ... well, let's just say that ought to scotch any collusion accusations from owners.

"In all honesty, we came into this thing without expecting to be a player for starting pitching," Astros general manager Ed Wade said. "We were prepared to pay significant money for Randy Wolf a year ago, but because of the economy we had to back out.

"Guys at the top of the market are going to get their money."

Indeed. In the case of Wolf, three years is what it took to get him. The Mets were one of the teams offering two years.

"With Penny, [new Houston manager and former Boston bench coach] Brad Mills said that just before he was released by Boston, he started to get his arm strength back," Wade said. "He showed he was healthy in San Francisco.

"On a one-year deal, it makes sense. If there's a bounce back, it can be a big bounce back."

-- Still, more teams than not left Indianapolis with long to-do lists, without having accomplished much of what they need to before spring training  draws too much closer. A large part of the reason is because the deadline for a club to tender contracts to its arbitration-eligible players -- Saturday -- comes after the winter meetings. Probably somewhere close to 100 or more free agents will flood the market after that. "From the GM's point of view, we all wish more trades were made," Cubs GM Jim Hendry said. "It was slower than we all anticipated. There are so many free agents, and there will be more after Saturday. If you can come to a deal with a player without giving up prospects, then that's the way to go."

-- You've heard of "location, location, location" in the real estate business, but it was a key to getting the three-way trade between Detroit, the Yankees and Arizona done this week, too. Diamondbacks' GM Josh Byrnes was able to drive over and see Ian Kennedy pitch in the Arizona Fall League this fall, and his first-hand scouting of Kennedy helped move along the discussions.

-- One other thought on the three-way deal: Several baseball people wondered in the aftermath of the deal whether Arizona knows something about the two young pitchers it sent to Detroit, Max Scherzer and Daniel Schlerer, like whether they're injured.  One scout who saw each toward the end of the year said he doesn't think that's an issue, but did say he thinks each is a long-term health risk given the way they pitch with maximum effort and given each's body type. OK, fine. But remember, people have been saying that for the past few years about a guy in San Francisco, fella named Tim Lincecum.

-- Atlanta left with an excess of starting pitching and still hoping it can acquire a middle of the lineup bat. The Braves will continue to field inquiries about starters Javier Vazquez and Derek Lowe, and they probably will have to absorb some of either's contract to get a deal done. Vazquez, the more likely of the two to be traded, is owed $11.5 million in 2010, Lowe is due $45 million over the next three years.

-- Seattle GM Jack Zduriencik on the Mariners' talks with free agent slugger Jason Bay. "We've left our options open to acquire more talent. There are several ways we could go about that."

-- Zduriencik on Seattle's winter so far: "We're very satisfied, certainly, with signing Chone Figgins. We restructured Jack Wilson's contract, locked him up for the next two years. We brought Ken Griffey Jr. back. As we sit here today, we have three pieces that are very important to next year's club. We still have flexibility with Figgins [who can play third base, second or left field}. We needed a guy like Chone. We targeted him from the get-go."

-- Most likely trade partner with Toronto for Roy Halladay remains the Los Angeles Angels. Philadelphia was said to be talking with Toronto, but Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro said Thursday "there's nothing likely" regarding a trade with the Blue Jays. If the Angels would include shortstop Erick Aybar -- doubtful -- that would be key to getting a deal done.

-- If the Angels can't reach an agreement for an extension with Halladay -- who has one year and $16 million remaining on his contract -- then they would accordingly reduce the level of the package of players they ship to Toronto.

-- The Phillies were in trade talks with Atlanta for Rafael Soriano "pretty deep", according to Amaro, before Tampa Bay acquired the reliever.

-- The Mets made offers to two free agents, outfielder Jason Bay and catcher Bengie Molina, just before departing the meetings Thursday, sources close to the team said.

-- One NL executive's prediction as he wheeled his suitcase through the Marriott lobby Thursday: Jason Bay winds up signing with Seattle and Matt Holliday with Boston.

-- The Cubs, in the market for a center fielder, very well could wind up signing one of two free agents, either Mike Cameron or Marlon Byrd. Cameron played for manager Lou Piniella in Seattle. "As a player and a person, I have the utmost respect for him, there's no question," Piniella said. "I had him in Seattle and got along with him very well. He's a guy that, he can play. He likes to play."

 

Comments
Big Brad
Since: Jul 3, 2009
Posted on: December 12, 2009 12:30 am
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Since: Aug 20, 2006
Posted on: December 10, 2009 9:48 pm
 

Slow meetings, price of pitching and more

Cubs rotationis a terrible joke. How could anyone in their right mind want Jeff Samardzia, Tom Gorzelanny or Seam marshall as thier #5 and call themselves a contender? I've bled blue for 36 years and can't understand why hendry would not pursue a top tier talent like Lackey or Halladay. New owners with deep pockets should add up to more wins but I'm not seing it. Trade Soriano and Bradley. Hell trade Koske Fukudome and his overpriced underperformed contract and let the prospects grow. It can't get much worse.



Since: Nov 18, 2006
Posted on: December 10, 2009 7:56 pm
 

Slow meetings, price of pitching and more

Your right. The prospect of the Braves eating any of Vaz's salary is laughable. Lets say they "eat" 3 mil - then someone is getting one of the top 5NL pitchers from last year for the same price as Penny and Harden. Hilarious. Throw the other guys with similar numbers, Lince, Carp, Wainwight and Lee in the mix and ask if their value is 6-8 million. Lowe is probably worth 10-12 mil so they might have to take some of that on the chin. Such a bad move in hindsight with Hanson coming up and Huddy on the mend. Im glad we didnt get Burnett though.



Since: Dec 3, 2008
Posted on: December 10, 2009 7:11 pm
 

Braves eating salary?

Do you really think that the Bravos will have to eat salary, given how high starting pitching is being signed for? I'm not saying that 15MM for Lowe is cheap, but he's definitely better and more durable than Wolf, Penny, and Harden.
And while I could see them eating some of Lowe's contract, I dont think any team getting Javy Vazquez in a trade could demand the Braves eat salary after the way he pitched last year.


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