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Blog Entry

Love Letters: Fixing the Mets Edition

Posted on: November 23, 2010 6:16 pm
 

Meet the Mets, greet the Mets ... and we did both with their new manager Terry Collins. ...

FROM: Greg K.
Re.: Mets complete clubhouse makeover with Collins hire

Scott,

As a Mets fan, thank you - THANK YOU - for injecting a dose of sanity into the fan and media reaction to the Terry Collins hiring. Reading some of the drivel put out there in the last 18 hours I don't want to mention any names, but ... it makes you wonder whether any objectivity or logic, or intelligence, or consideration, or patience is even possible when writing about the Mets anymore. It's refreshing to actually see some intelligent analysis rather than the knee-jerk mentality which has overtaken much of the media -- and the die-hards -- when it comes to the Mets. Keep it up!

It's the Mets. They've come to specialize in knee-jerk, haven't they?

FROM: Jack H.

Another retread. It will take a miracle. Collins needs to get the team to do a 180. Personally, I would have given Wally Backman a one-year contract. I think he would have taken it. I just wouldn't make the contract public because I wouldn't want the team to know it was only for a year. That team needs a kick-ass manager and I don't see that from Collins.

What's your definition of a "kick-ass" manager? In many ways, Collins is or could be that guy. I think you're on the right track in some areas, but I disagree on the one-year deal. Nothing is secret anymore. It would leak. And you cannot have a rookie manager on a one-year deal. That's a neon sign to the clubhouse that he does not have authority.

FROM: Finbar

Scott:

From your own article, I give you the following: "When we last saw Collins in a big-league manager's chair, the late-'90s Angels were blowing up around him in spectacular fashion. The Mo Vaughn free agent signing was a colossal mistake, the clubhouse was rife with dissension, everybody hated everybody and Collins' spirited ways were a daily dose of salt to what was an open and festering clubhouse wound. Something had to give, and it was Collins. He lost the clubhouse, then his job."

Your words, and if true, this cannot be a good candidate for a job in NY. Especially with 10 years of a lack of managing. This team needs a cultural, not logistical, change. Can Collins deliver such a thing? Anyone who ever lost a clubhouse is problematic particularly in NY/NJ. If he lost a team out west, how will he regain a team in New York? Fair question, I think!Share thoughts!

It is a very fair question. And it is a key question. I also wrote that Collins is a smart man and should have been able to figure some things out in his decade away from managing -- where he went wrong with the Angels, what he could have done differently. To me, his success depends directly on this. He's a smart man. If he's learned a few things, he will do just fine in New York. If he proves incapable of learning what he needed to, then Sandy Alderson will be looking for a new manager sooner rather than later.

FROM: Frank D.

Though I would have preferred Wally Backman, I like the hire. Here's why: Collins knows the Mets farm system. You will see more young players this year and he knows them. Collins will be better equipped to understand how to use them. Jerry Manuel didn't have a clue.

Also, Collins will not tolerate any garbage. That means malcontents like Carlos Beltran. If he's here, he won't be tolerated. He'll be unafraid to sit those who jake it. This certainly signals Luis Castillo and Oliver Perez have no place here. It's a matter of time before they're eradicated. Collins is IMO keeping the seat warm for Backman. Wally will manage St. Lucie, then perhaps be moved up to Binghamton or Buffalo.

Terry is a transition guy and is here to clean up Omar Minaya's and Manuel's mess, and leave it [better] for the next guy. He's a good company guy and he's a decent manager (444-434). Since the end of the year, the Mets have rid themselves of incompetents like Minaya and Manuel. They've added a real brain trust in Alderson, J.P. Ricciardi and Paul DePodesta. Collins in in that vein. He's cerebral and professional.

Now the four of them have to turn their efforts towards dumping the garbage. I think they'll surprise some people how much they can do. I'm hoping they'll make trades and have free-agent signings, not to make a splash on the back pages of the dying newspapers, but ones that actually make the team better. My guess is unlike Minaya, they'll have a plan. A real plan. I'm actually very happy with what has occured. I'm looking forward to 2011 and hopefully a team that cares and shows respect for the game and fans.

Well played, Mr. Frank. You're last sentence summarizes things nicely.

FROM: Wesley Kempton
Re.: Anderson's passing sparks many wonderful baseball memories

Mr. Miller,

I am a senior Communications major at the University of Wyoming. Wyoming is a place so far from baseball and the rest of the world that it is somewhat a haven for what baseball used to be. Everyone everywhere can get baseball on TV, but when you are so far from the game, you are left to romanticize as in days of old through radio, great play-by-play, and great writing.

I have a heartfelt appreciation for baseball; for the way it is and the way I imagine it used to be. I appreciate the noble simplicities of baseball and all things associated with it. More than anything, and I think all baseball fans can agree to this: I appreciate people sharing memories of baseball. It is a bond that can nostalgically unite many fans of summer's greatest companion.

It is for that that I thank you for your piece on Sparky Anderson. My Dad lived in Southern Ohio in the '50s, '60s and '70s, and my bedtime stories were about a Big Red Machine. The greatest team ever, he told me. My opinion of that declaration is still in deliberation, but I still love hearing those fairy tales. My father sent me the link to this column. A lifelong Reds fan, and a lifelong Sparky fan, he and I shared a smile through your column, several hundred miles apart.Thank you very much for continuing this bond of baseball.

Your father sounds like a wonderful man, Wesley. Thanks for sharing this story, and best of luck in Wyoming and beyond.

 

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