Blog Entry

The Ole Miss side of the story

Posted on: December 18, 2008 3:54 pm
Edited on: December 18, 2008 4:22 pm
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The details of what led to Ole Miss coach Andy Kennedy's arrest early Thursday remain unclear and disputed. But a source who was with Kennedy told CBSSports.com "nobody hit the cab driver" and that he's certain Kennedy will be cleared of all charges.

Here's the Ole Miss side of the story:

According to the source, the coaching staff had a team meeting, finished film and then went out for dinner and drinks Wednesday night in Cincinnati, where Kennedy used to coach. The party was a mixture of Ole Miss coaches, officials and some of Kennedy's friends from Cincinnati, and when it was time to go, the five coaches -- Kennedy and assistants Michael White, Owen Miller, Torrey Ward and Bill Armstrong -- jumped in a cab to take them back to the Marriott across the river in Kentucky.

Kennedy was in the front seat.

The four assistants were in the back.

According to the source, after driving "maybe a tenth of a mile" the cab driver realized there were five people in the car, and he told the coaches that he could not take five passengers. So he stopped, at which point Kennedy and his assistants jumped in another cab, one with a driver willing to take five passengers. At that point, the source said, the first cab driver pulled up beside the second cab driver and started yelling at the second driver "in a foreign language," and then the second cab driver turned to the coaches and asked if they owed the first cab driver money.

The coaches said they did not owe anybody anything because the first driver refused to transport them. Then, according to the source, assistant Torrey Ward, who is black, told the driver to stop talking to the other driver and to get them back to their hotel.

"And then the cab driver turned around and said "Shut the f-ck up, n-gger," the source said. "That's when things got heated."

According to the source, the coaches and cab driver did exchange words, "but nobody hit the driver." The source added that Kennedy and his assistants tried to get out of the cab, but that the driver locked the doors and got on his cell phone, "and we think that's when he called the cops." Eventually, the source said, the driver unlocked the doors and let the coaches out. They then got in a third cab and traveled about a half-mile before the cops pulled the cab over and approached the car.

"The cops said, 'Coach Kennedy, we need you to get out of the car," the source said. "They told him he was under arrest for assault."

According to the source, Armstrong came to the defense of Kennedy, started telling the police "this is bullsh-t" and that Kennedy didn't do anything wrong. That's when Armstrong was arrested, and then White, Miller and Ward waited at the police station for Kennedy and Armstrong to be released.

Also worth noting: There have been reports that Armstrong was kicked out of the Lodge Bar, which preceded the coaches getting in the first cab, but according to the source, that is "100 percent not true." Alex Moller, the general manager of the Lodge Bar, supports that claim. He told the Clarion Ledger newspaper in Mississippi: "The reports that they were kicked out are untrue. They were here, but they left on good terms. As for what happened after they left the bar, I don't know. But there was no incident here."

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Category: NCAAB
Comments

Since: Dec 4, 2006
Posted on: December 20, 2008 10:17 am
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

wrong... if a complaint is made... it is grounds for an arrest




Since: Dec 4, 2006
Posted on: December 20, 2008 10:15 am
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

wrong... if a complaint is made... it is grounds for an arrest




Since: Oct 12, 2008
Posted on: December 19, 2008 7:56 pm
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

It will likely take a while to sort this story out.  I lived in NYC for years and witnessed some pretty crazy stuff with cab drivers which gives the Ole Miss side of the story a certain ring of truth.  Nevertheless one cannot discount the possibility that certain things were intentionally left out of the Ole Miss account because the stakes here, particularly if a civil suit is filed which names the university as a defendant, are high. 



Since: Dec 19, 2008
Posted on: December 19, 2008 7:04 pm
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

An Alabama blogger is on top of the story, and it doesn't look good for Kennedy:

 




Since: Sep 2, 2008
Posted on: December 19, 2008 3:38 pm
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

Gary,

Once again, you're the first with real information on a story.




Since: Dec 19, 2008
Posted on: December 19, 2008 11:38 am
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

Blogger has an interesting take on the Kennedy story. He says this could wind up as a drawn-out civil case, and that doesn't sound good for the coaches.

 




Since: Mar 6, 2007
Posted on: December 19, 2008 10:31 am
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

I was right to an extent, Arkansas law which obviously is different than Ohio thank God, a police officer can only make an arrest on a misdemeanor charge if they witness the crime.  Only exclusion is Domestic Battery where there is evidence or admission of assault. 

And after speaking to my attorney buddy who is my neighbor he said that there is a good chance there is going to be some witnesses surface that saw a confromtation or the prosecutor won't charge him.  Meaning at his hearing on the 18th charges will be dropped unless there is a smoking gun that ESPN and the media haven't heard about yet.




Since: Dec 19, 2008
Posted on: December 19, 2008 8:34 am
 

A crime was committed

Coach Kennedy looks to be vindicated.  Coach Armstrong needs to respect the police and prosecuted for obstruction of justice.  Liquid courage at 1:45 AM seems to contributed to this arrest.  



Since: Jan 28, 2008
Posted on: December 18, 2008 11:55 pm
 

The Ole Miss side of the story

Looks like I should have been downtown tonight!


playmaker21
Since: Sep 28, 2006
Posted on: December 18, 2008 11:08 pm
This comment has been removed.

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