Blog Entry

Vick back -- sort of

Posted on: July 27, 2009 4:44 pm
Edited on: July 27, 2009 4:45 pm
 
Mike Vick can play NFL football again.

Sort of.

NFL commissioner Roger Goodell conditionally reinstated Vick Monday. Vick is free to sign with any team immediately, but he will not be fully reinstated. Goodell will make a decision by Week Six at the latest, but that decision could come earlier.

That means Vick is twisting in the wind. There is still uncertainty about when he will be able to play. Wtih that hanging over his head, who signs him?

Would you take a PR nightmare for the possibility of having him for 10 or 11 games? I wouldn't. Most teams won't either.

So who signs him? Teams haven't exactly lined up, but they might have been waiting for the commissioner to make his decision. Now that it's out, we'll see.

I've heard the New England Patriots mentioned, but that makes no sense. What would they do, take snaps away from Tom Brady? Make him a receiver?

It makes no sense.

I think Vick's best option is to play in the UFL with Orlando. He can make $1 million for six games and show he can still play after two years of inactivity.

I hear he wants no part of that league. But if he has no options, we'll see.

Vick really isn't an attractive option to the NFL right now. He made it that way when he stupidly fought the dogs. Goodell enhanced it Monday with his ruling.

Vick is back. Just not all the way.

Who wants him? Anybody?
Category: NFL
Tags: Mike Vick
 
Comments

Since: May 17, 2007
Posted on: July 27, 2009 9:55 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

Hey AFC North Fan, thats a very well thought out and presented argument.  I respect that.  Just not sure I buy into it.  Not because I don't like Michael Vick, or because I think what he did is way worse than what Stallworth did... but because I think there's too many pro athletes that don't demonstrate enough intelligence to deserve the life "they coulda/shoulda/woulda had".  Too many of our star athletes are 'physically gifted' but obviously are lacking something upstairs.  Think about it.  If you were in a job scheduled to make $400k a year, would you do ANYTHING that would jeopardize that opportunity?

MOST of the pro sports players/stars can answer that question as we'd expect, and stay out of legal trouble.  The few that can't; well maybe they shouldn't be star athletes, household names, millionairres, or our childrens' idols. 
I don't feel sorry for any pro athlete convicted of a felony.  In fact, his second chance should include re-entering society and taking a "regular job" in order to support himself and/or his family.  He doesn't actually need a mega (pro-athlete) salary to do that... 

btw, Ratman37, congratulations! You've learned how to use CAP LOCKS and larger font sizes.  Well done. We're all so much more convinced by whatever you say now...



Since: Jun 15, 2009
Posted on: July 27, 2009 9:54 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

You're comparing Vick to a software engineer.  Sorry, but I'm sure there are plenty of software engineers to fill your buddys spot.  The difference with Vick, is that you can't just go out and get another Mick Vick!  As a fan of football, I like to watch the best players in the world put there skills up against one another.  Vick was one of the best at what he did, and I want to see it again.  Everyone else has already said it, the guy did his time, two years in prison. I mean c'mon, lets play some FOOTBALL!



Since: Mar 18, 2009
Posted on: July 27, 2009 9:41 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

 

I think people are missing the point here. Why should your local bank vice president that gets convicted of a misdemeanor DUI AND DIDNT KILL ANYBODY be unable to get his job back, or a comparable job somewhere else where, but a professional athlete that gets convicted of a felony IS entitled to get his job back? Why should a college kid get a misdemeanor disorderly conduct conviction (drunken bar room fight) and be unable to get a job when he graduates BUT an actor or athlete should be ENTITLED to his or her livelihood?




Since: Jul 27, 2009
Posted on: July 27, 2009 9:20 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

I AM SO SICK OF ALL U VICK HATERS-- and i for one would love to see him here in NE---HE DID HIS TIME, GET THE FREAK OVER IT...
and trust when i say someone will sign him.



Since: May 22, 2008
Posted on: July 27, 2009 9:09 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

I know i will take a hit on my score but whocares they need to give Goodell a yr suspension come on  the guy paid his debt let himplay Goodell has let his power go to his head



Since: Mar 19, 2008
Posted on: July 27, 2009 8:52 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of


  NO ONE CARES WHAT YOU HAVE TO SAY AND DONT COME BACK WITH SOME HALFASS COME BACK YOU STOLD FROM A MOVIE!!!! WA THE MEAN GUY MADE FUN OF ME... SHUT UP




Since: Dec 10, 2006
Posted on: July 27, 2009 8:49 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

The guy spent more time in jail than Stallworth spent in for killing a fellow human being.  Why I don't want to be a broken record I can't get over how certain people in society value animals more than humans. This is not valuing an animal over a person.  Stallworth was stupid and reckless and his mistake caused a death.  Vick was cruel and knowingly engaged in despicable acts.  It is naive to think that the abililty to (releatedly) be that cruel to an animal occurs in a vacuum - if someone is capable off this type of behavior they are certainly also a danger to other people in society as well.

As far as the delayed reinstatement, keep in mind that Vick lied directly to Goodell about his involvement in dog fighting.  Completing his sentence does not eliminate the league from holding a player responsible for his actions while a player.  I don't find Goodell's additional sanction surprising at all - it acts as a deterrent to other players being less than honest with the commisioner's office.






Since: Mar 19, 2008
Posted on: July 27, 2009 8:42 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

YEH LET THIS GUY WRITE ARTICLES THIS GUY KNOWS LIFE LIVE AND LEARN. right on f**k yeh



Since: Sep 11, 2006
Posted on: July 27, 2009 8:41 pm
 

Vick back -- sort of

I am sick and tired of watching this debate go on ad nausem.  There are a couple of points that seem to be missing here:  (1)  not everyone shares the same views of what constitutes proper treatment of an animal.  I grew up in a small town and lived on a farm for 1year.  We adored our dog. She was part of the family.  I was appalled at the treatment of the animals on the farm.  If an animal died, it died. The only purpose for those cats was to keep rats out of the cattle feed.  I was told that about every 2 years, max, some illness would infect the destroy the entire population.  Dogs would die.  Cattle would die. It was a way of life and nobody considered taking the dogs and cats to the vet.  It's not how things are done on a farm.  I know people that have personally put pets "out of their misery".  I passed my values onto my children.  I don't expect all adults to have the same values and I can't adopt every animal that I don't believe is properly cared for.  Why do so many people think that we all have the same values or that we were all raised with the same consciousness?  Or that we should see things exactly as they do?  We have become a nation of elitists.

(2)  How many of you are vegetarians?  The cattle and pigs that you consume were bred as a food source.  These dogs were bred for fighting.  I don't agree with dog fighting, cock fighting, horse racing, or greyhound racing.  There's big money in all of these activities.  The bottomline is that once these animals have served their purpose they are discarded.  Do you have any idea how many greyhound shelters there are for discarded dogs?  What happens to horses that aren't among the elite few that run the triple crown and later sold for studding purposes?  How do you decide what is humane?  Who appointed you judge and executioner?  Did you decide Michael Vick was beneath contempt while you were slamming a burger?  Why are some animals treated differentially?

(3)  Any Old Testament fans?  Doesn't the Bible give dominion over animals to man?  Why then is a man's life less valuable than dogs' lives?  I'm referring to the Stallworth case of course.  Why is there a greater outcry regarding Michael Vick? 

(4)  For those of you deluding yourselves into thinking that your friends, whom have been convicted of felonies or misdemeanors, are being judged by a double standard, get real.  If your friend had a job that only a few people are talented or smart enough to do, they would find jobs in the fields in which they once worked.  The fact is most of us have jobs in which we can easily be replaced.  If you were an employer that could chose an IT tech with a criminal record or without, who would you choose?  How many elite athletes are there?  It's an arbitrary, but finite number.  Michael Vick does not have the potential to recoup the money he's lost as a result of his poor decisions, but you and I have never possessed the potential that he does even now.  If you have the luxury of choosing between Peyton Manning and Michael Vick, you take Manning.  If you have the choice of Michael Vick and the kid that was the starting QB on your high school team, you take Vick.  Supply and demand, not a double standard.  I believe if Vick were an IT tech, he'd have trouble finding a job too.

(5)  As a Ravens fan, let me remind you that the court of public opinion doesn't shut down when the civil, district and criminal courts do.  It would be far easier for Vick to walk away from the NFL than to subject himself to the taunts that he faces.  Ray Lewis accepted a plea bargain to a perjury charge and still can't go into an opponent stadium and not be faced with signs that taunt him, calling him a murderer.  This is from January 2000!  Vick isn't looking for an easy way out or he could simply sell his life story, the movie rights and host his own cable show.  I wonder if he knows how difficult it will be to walk the road he has chosen?  I am impressed that he did not chose the path of least resistance. 

(6)  I agree that he's not a role model today.  He's not who I want my children to emulate.  If he becomes who he claims to be, he has an excellent opportunity to teach our children the power of redemption and second chances.  My daughter was a pregnant unwed teen.  It's only through redemption and second chances that she's become a dean's list college student with a husband and another child due in 2 weeks.  If we do not allow second chances people like Michael Vick and my daughter are categoric failures.  My daughter was raised to believe if you make a mistake you fix it and don't make the same mistake twice.  Why are we a society that sets our heroes high on a pedestal only to delight in their failure?  If Vick can redeem who are we to stand in his way?

Vick hasn't chosen the easy way out.  He's choosing to stand in and fight the good fight.  The courts have released him.  The NFL has opened the door.  In my opinion, as long as he's not forgotten what he's done, we should be willing to forgive.



Since: Aug 1, 2008
Posted on: July 27, 2009 8:39 pm
 

Enough is enough

Michael Vick has recieved way too much media attention. The quality of reporting and reporters in this county has hit an all-time low.



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