Blog Entry

Fines levied

Posted on: October 19, 2010 5:30 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 5:36 pm
 

The hefty fines levied against three players for illegal hits Tuesday will open some eyes around the NFL.

It won't stop the hits.

The league fined Pittsburgh's James Harrison $75,000, and New England's Brandon Meriweather and Atlanta's Dunta Robinson each $50,000 for hits this past weekend.

That's a lot of money, more than many make in a year. But if the NFL really thinks that will change the way guys play, they are nuts.

Harrison's fine was the biggest because he's a repeat offender.

Football is a violent, nasty game. What was Robinson supposed to do when he was beating down on DeSean Jackson? Stop and think? Then the guy catches the ball and races by him. Robinson hit him with his shoulder, not his helmet, but was fined for launching.

There is a real fine line here. I saw a Jaguars safety beating down on a receiver Monday night and he pulled up, probably because of the uproar made over the weekend hits.

I think hits to the head are serious stuff, but they're no worse than a chop block that shreds a knee.

Is the NFL overreacting? That's what they do when the media goes bonkers on a subject, which they are about the hits.

 


Category: NFL
Comments

Since: Sep 29, 2006
Posted on: October 20, 2010 8:47 am
 

Fines

Curious...  What does the NFL do with the fines?  Can they allow the fines to go to a charity if they are going to charge ridiculous fines to players doing their jobs?  I honestly don't know how players are to play football if they have to think about their tackles after a ball carrier speeds by them.  The league mine as well do something good with these fines and donate them to a charity.



Since: Nov 1, 2009
Posted on: October 20, 2010 8:44 am
 

Fines levied

I don't think it should ever be the severity of the hit but rather the leading with the head.  Harrison is going to get himself or someone else crippled with his technique.  Hit has hard as you want but use your shoulder and not to the head of the opposing player.



Since: Jul 5, 2007
Posted on: October 20, 2010 8:26 am
 

Fines levied

Do none of you find it ironic that the NFL, a league that is "so interested in protecting its players safety," is about to start suspending players for hits that are deemed by some "higher entity" as being too hard? However, this very same league does not require players to wear the one piece of equipment that can truly help prevent concussions, that is a mouthpiece. Don't believe me, check out this article from 2006.

 

In case you were wondering, I checked the rulebook and the NFL still doesn't require mouthpieces. The NFL is doing thing a$$ backwards here. Protect the players? I agree, they need to be protected. But trying to take the violence out of a violent game is not the way to do that. Helmet reasearch has got to continue and for protection of the players, mouthpieces must be required. If a player isn't wearing a mouthpiece, flag him 15 yards and don't allow that player back in the game until they have a mouthpiece in. In high school mouthpieces are required, I even remember being flagged for forgetting to put mine in.




Since: Jan 1, 2007
Posted on: October 20, 2010 6:31 am
 

Fines levied

Is this Soccer?If the NFL has a kneejerk reaction to plays "after the fact", creates rules and makes them "retroactive" and fines players with no recourse, then yes, this is soccer. Next week we will see players flailing on the ground, being carted off on a stretcher and returning to play.... just like soccer to "sell" an infraction.

Don't fret, the NFL has a history of knee jerk reactions and has undoubtedly done it again. Once the ratings take a hit, they will rethink their position. Oh yea, they have 18 games.... Guess it will have to be 20 games.

What was that about safety?



Since: Oct 9, 2006
Posted on: October 20, 2010 3:40 am
 

Fines levied

Did you just compare someone's brain to their knee?





Since: Jun 6, 2010
Posted on: October 20, 2010 12:52 am
 

Fines levied

I agree that the NFL is going way overboard on fining and possibly suspending these players for these hits.  The NFL wants these men to be 250 lbs plus and run under 4.5 40 and not expect to have some violent collisions.  Its simple math and physics.  And I agree with Harrison, you try to hurt somebody, not injure them, but hurt them.  You want them thinking.  Thats what I want my linebackers thinking every time they hit someone.  Pretty soon, Goddel will turn this into flag football and their ratings will begin to go south.  What does he think, Football became America's pastime becauses its a beautiful sport, no, it become America's pastime because its a violent sport.  Dont you forget that



Since: Mar 19, 2007
Posted on: October 20, 2010 12:18 am
 

Fines levied

Couldn't agree more. If you want to watch a game on grass that has 500 yards passing a game and the QB's & WR's are almost untouchable by defenders watch arena football. Nothing like a solid defensive arena league game that ends up 48-42

Ronnie Lot, Steve Atwater, & John Lynch please help us!!!!




Since: Jan 28, 2009
Posted on: October 19, 2010 11:47 pm
 

Fines levied

NFL = National Fairy League




Since: Dec 20, 2006
Posted on: October 19, 2010 11:28 pm
 

Fines levied

the league is changing the game into basketball on grass , all the rules they are making is to turn the game into a passing game that puts up huge yards in the air . there is no rule to protect a running back or any linemen , no protection for anyone on defense . if thats the football you wanna see, then arena football is the game for you and its much cheaper, please dont turn the NFL into this



Since: Oct 11, 2007
Posted on: October 19, 2010 11:18 pm
 

Fines levied

being paralized is a huge deal so yes, they should crack down on head shots more. Cracking down on cheap shots to the knees would be interesting. Friggin Bobby Wade took out Rodney right before the playoffs in 06....still having nightmares about dallas clark running wild vs eric alexander.


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