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Blog Entry

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Posted on: January 13, 2011 9:29 pm
Edited on: January 13, 2011 9:38 pm
 

If you read this blog regularly, you know how I feel about quarterbacks and their importance.


In recent weeks, I've been asked often about Auburn's Cam Newton and whether I think he can be a quality NFL quarterback.


My answer: I'm intrigued.


Until I actually watch him on tape -- end zone and wide camera angles -- I will say that he has a lot of things to like, but it's too tough to evaluate him based on watching his games. Newton is declaring for the NFL Draft, so now the process will start for real.


I will say this: I think he's a better passer than both Vince Young and Tim Tebow were coming out of college. Some will say that's not hard to do, but both were first-round picks. Should Newton be a first-round pick? Time will tell.


He is big. He is strong. He has a really good arm. But can he read coverage? We have no idea based on what he did at Auburn. In that spread offense, he was rarely asked to sit in the pocket and make throws. I will say this, he made a great throw to the fullback on a wheel route in the National Championship Game Monday night against Oregon.


I don't like run-around quarterbacks. But I'm not sure that's what this kid will end up being.  When Bucs quarterback Josh Freeman came out of Kansas State, he was considered by some to be running quarterback. That's what he was asked to do in college, even though he didn't really like it. Who knew he was film junkie who could really read coverages. K-State didn't play to that strength.


I hear Newton loves the game and will put in the work -- something Young didn't do early in his career. If he does that, Newton has a chance. For now, the early evaluation process leaves me thinking that I need to see more.


I am intrigued.



Category: NFL
Tags: Cam Newton
 
Comments

Since: Jan 19, 2011
Posted on: January 19, 2011 12:05 pm
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Too early to tell is not a verdict, a verdict is when it is not too early to tell anymore, this title makes no sense.



Since: Dec 11, 2010
Posted on: January 17, 2011 9:20 pm
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Question to CBS Sports:  Why do you allow comments following these articles?  
All you're going to get are a bunch of want-to-be experts bashing the columnist.  
Why do this to your people?  
It must have them second-guessing every piece they write.  Inevitably you get a bunch of comments like "you don't know what you're talking about."  or the usual two or three guys getting into a flame war.
Do yourself a favor: If you're going to allow comments, at least monitor them so only those who have legit points are posted.
Flame on!



Since: Jan 14, 2011
Posted on: January 14, 2011 11:05 am
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Freeman, though he may have run a lot at K-State, was by no means a running qb.  He came out of high school a pro-style pocket passer, and Ron Prince tailored the offense around Freemans abilities.  Prince was so confident in Freeman's decision making from the pocket he basically abandoned the run game.  Almost all of Josh's runs at K-State his first two years were scrambles because his o-line couldn't protect him on a regular basis.  In his junior year more qb designed runs were called but not many because he was the only legitimate threat in the backfield because Prince completely neglected the RB position in his recruiting, the offense was still basically built on Freeman being able to disect a coverage sitting in the pocket, or audible to a screen pass (which was the K-State run game).  He left early because he shattered the KSU Passing records and when Prince was fired and Snyder was in essence "re-hired" because Snyder has always preferred a more mobile, run-first qb (a la Michael Bishop and Ell Roberson).  The reason Freeman was such an effective runner was, yes he was deceptively quick for hisbulky size (6'6 250ish), but he often ran right through tackles, many times multiple ones.  Granted I thought he'd be successful in the NFL, but I thought it'd take longer than 2 years though, but I'm happy for him, hope he can build on it next year.




Since: Jun 25, 2009
Posted on: January 14, 2011 10:03 am
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Prisco needs to get his info right......Freeman was not a running QB at Kansas St.  Prisco must be getting his QB's mixed up or he's just a complete moron.
C'mon... we all know Prisco is NOT a moron... but you certainly are.  In his last year in college Freeman ran over 100 times for over 400 yards... any qb that runs over 100 times is "going to be considered by some" to be a "running" qb....  and it's a very realistic assumption to make.   Why on earth would that be considered so stupid? Why does that assumption make anybody a moron?  OVER ONE HUNDRED ATTEMPS RUSHING THE BALL.... that's a lot for a guy that never even came close to approaching those numbers the years prior.



Since: Aug 24, 2006
Posted on: January 14, 2011 9:05 am
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Prisco says it's too early to tell.Why even write the story? Take a stand one way or the other.Isn't that his job?
If he wont, I will.Newton is indeed a qb quality passer in the NFL.However he's gotta wind up with the right team.If he gets drafted by a team like Buffalo, Cleveland,etc, I'm afraid he might be rushed & be expected to play in a year or 2.Put him on a team that's already a winner & he'll have a chance to learn at his own pace.For example, Tom Brady has 3 or 4 years left barring injury.Who could be a better teacher for Newton than Brady & BB.I know I may be dreaming a bit here, but the Pats have a ton of picks and it's not out of the realm of possibilities that they could trade up to get him.



Since: Feb 23, 2007
Posted on: January 14, 2011 8:17 am
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Prisco needs to get his info right......Freeman was not a running QB at Kansas St.  Prisco must be getting his QB's mixed up or he's just a complete moron. 



Since: Nov 25, 2006
Posted on: January 14, 2011 12:42 am
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Don't act like you're going to sit down and watch film on this kid



Since: Oct 11, 2006
Posted on: January 13, 2011 11:50 pm
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

i guess Prisco wouldnt mind seeing Cam Newton as the number one overall pick like SOME Panther fans i talked to want.



Since: Jul 13, 2010
Posted on: January 13, 2011 11:32 pm
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Hmmm. Another site just as nationally-renowned as this one stated that their "source close to the program" told them that Newton was NOT much of a worker, but rather glided by on his atleticism and toothy smile. They said that the only difference between Cam and JaMarcus Russell (ugh) was that Cam has his father to keep him focused and on task, whereas Russell had no one but his posse of yes-men around him. For Cam's part, that's not a ringing endorsement. Now, how true all that is, I don't know. And a lot of his success or failure at the NFL level will be about his circumstances; who drafts him, who coaches him, what kind of talent does he have around him, whether he has to play right away or sit on the bench for a year and watch, etc. But I do agree with Prisco on one thing, and I'll take it a step further than he did: Newton is a better passer RIGHT NOW, coming out of college, than either Vince Young or Tim Tebow are RIGHT NOW, and those guys were first-rounders.

What does everyone think about Mallett as a pro? I think if he goes to a team with a good-to-great offensive line, he'll be awesome. If not, he'll be roadkill. Could be another Dan Marino, or he could be another Drew Bledsoe.




Since: Dec 27, 2007
Posted on: January 13, 2011 11:23 pm
 

Verdict on Newton: Too early to tell

Prisco, you're a writer (bad one at that). Not a Scout or talent evaluator. No one is going to take your assessment of Cam Newtons mechanics seriously. Save yourself the embarrassment. 


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